NanoEngineering (NANO)

BUSINESS AFFAIRS:
240 Structural Materials Engineering Building, Warren College

STUDENT AFFAIRS:
Undergraduate Affairs: 241A & B Structural Materials Engineering Building, Warren College
Graduate Affairs: 240A Structural Materials Engineering Building, Warren College

http://nanoengineering.ucsd.edu

All courses, faculty listings, and curricular and degree requirements described herein are subject to change or deletion without notice. Updates may be found on the Academic Senate website: http://senate.ucsd.edu/catalog-copy/approved-updates/.

Departmental Focus

The Department of NanoEngineering focuses on nanoscale science, engineering, and technology that have the potential to make valuable advances in different areas that include, to name a few, new materials, biology and medicine, energy conversion, sensors, and environmental remediation. Nanoengineering is a highly diversified and multidisciplinary field. The graduate research programs cover a broad range of topics, but focus particularly on biomedical nanotechnology, nanotechnologies for energy conversion and storage, computational nanotechnology, and molecular and nanomaterials. Undergraduate degree programs focus on integrating the various science and engineering disciplines necessary for successful careers in the evolving nanotechnology industry.

Degree and Program Options

The Department of NanoEngineering offers undergraduate programs leading to the BS in Nanoengineering and Chemical Engineering. The Chemical Engineering Program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET/EAC). The Nanoengineering Program is newly introduced, but the program is designed using ABET accreditation criteria; the department will apply for accreditation once there are graduates to measure the program outcomes. These two degree programs have very different requirements and are described in separate sections.

Nanoengineering Program (NANO)

Program Mission and Objectives

The mission of the Nanoengineering Program is to provide a multidisciplinary education in nanoscale science and technology. The primary goals are to

The Undergraduate Program

The BS program in Nanoengineering is tailored to provide breadth and flexibility by taking advantage of the strength of basic sciences and other engineering disciplines at UC San Diego. The intention is to graduate nanoengineers who are multidisciplinary and can work in a broad spectrum of industries.

All Nanoengineering courses are taught only once per year, and courses are scheduled to be consistent with the curriculum as shown in the tables below. Under normal circumstances, students must follow the prescribed curriculum. Unavoidable deviation from the curriculum, for example, to participate in the Education Abroad Program, must be approved by the Undergraduate Affairs Committee prior to taking alternative courses elsewhere. Approvals are also needed for engineering courses not listed under the current selections for different engineering focus areas. Courses such as NANO 195, 197, and 198 are not allowed as a Nanoengineering elective in meeting the upper-division major requirements. NANO 199 can be used as a technical elective only under restrictive conditions. Policy regarding these conditions may be obtained from the department’s Student Affairs Office. All students are encouraged to visit the Student Affairs Office or visit the Department of NanoEngineering website for any clarification and updated information. To graduate, students must maintain an overall GPA of at least 2.0, and the department requires at least a C– grade in each course required for the major.

General-Education/College Requirements

For graduation each student must satisfy general-education (GE) course requirements determined by the student’s college, as well as the major requirements determined by the department. The six colleges at UC San Diego require widely different general-education courses, and the number of such courses differs from one college to another. Each student should choose his or her college carefully, considering the special nature of the college and the breadth of general education.

The Nanoengineering curriculum allows for forty-eight* units of humanities and social science GE courses, which are sufficient to fulfill most, but not all, college requirements. Regardless of the specific college, students must develop a program that includes a total of at least forty-eight units in the arts, humanities, and social sciences, not including subjects such as accounting, industrial management, finance, or personnel administration. Students must consult with their college to determine which GE courses to take.

*The forty-eight units are shown for Warren College students as an example to fulfill the general-education requirements. Students in other colleges need to adjust the plan to match their own college requirements.

Major Requirements

To receive a BS in Nanoengineering, students must complete 193 units. The specific breakdown is as follows:

Humanities and social sciences (forty-eight units*): This requirement is intended to fulfill the general-education requirements (GE) from respective colleges.

*The 193 units for graduation and 48 units for GE requirements are shown for Warren College students as an example to fulfill the general education requirements. Students in other colleges need to adjust the plan to match their own college requirements.

Basic sciences and mathematics (sixty units): This lower-division requirement includes twenty-four units of mathematics (Math 20A–F), sixteen units of physics (Phys 2A–D), sixteen units of chemistry (Chem 6A–C, 7L), and four units of biology (BILD 1).

Engineering preparation (sixteen units): This requirement covers basics in computer programming, circuit analysis and circuits lab (NANO 15 and ECE 25, 35, and 65).

Nanoengineering core (thirty-seven units): This requirement is constituted of a one-unit seminar (NANO 1) and nine core courses (NANO 101 to 104, 110 to 112, and 120A-B).

Nanoengineering electives (eight units): This requirement must be chosen from among the upper-division NANO courses offered by the department.

Engineering focus (twenty-four units): Students are recommended to select all six engineering electives from within one single major to constitute an engineering focus. However, students are required to take only four of the six courses in one major. Preapproved accepted courses of each of the five focuses are listed below:

All students follow the same basic science preparation and core set of classes in nanoengineering during the first two years.

 

Fall

Winter

Spring

Freshman Year

Math 20A

Math 20B

Math 20C

Chem 6A

Chem 6B

Chem 6C

NANO 15

BILD 1

Phys 2A

GE GE GE

 

NANO 1

 

Sophomore Year

Math 20D

Math 20F

Math 20E

Phys 2B

Phys 2C

Phys 2D

Chem 7L

NANO 101

ECE 25

GE GE GE

After the sophomore year, students must choose an engineering focus. Sample programs of the five choices are shown below. Students must keep in mind that the NANO courses are only offered once a year.

Prerequisites must be taken prior to selecting focus courses.

Recommended Course Sequence—Bioengineering Focus

Fall

Winter

Spring

Junior Year

NANO 102

NANO 104

NANO 103

CENG 101A

BENG 109

BENG 100

ECE 35

ECE 65

NE Elective

GE

GE

GE

Senior Year

NANO 110

NANO 111

NANO 112

BENG 101

BENG 109

BENG 103B

NE Elective

NANO 120A

NANO 120B

GE

GE

GE

Recommended Course Sequence—Chemical Engineering Focus

Fall

Winter

Spring

Junior Year

NANO 102

NANO 104

NANO 103

CENG 100

CENG 102

CENG 113

ECE 35

ECE 65

NE Elective

GE

GE

GE

Senior Year

NANO 110

NANO 111

NANO 112

CENG 101A

CENG 101B

CENG 101C

NE Elective

NANO 120A

NANO 120B

GE

GE

GE

Recommended Course Sequence—Electrical Engineering Focus

Fall

Winter

Spring

Junior Year

NANO 102

NANO 104

NANO 103

ECE 35

ECE 65

ECE 134

ECE 103

ECE 136L

NE Elective

GE

GE

GE

Senior Year

NANO 110

NANO 111

NANO 112

ECE 135A

ECE 135B

ECE 139

NE Elective

NANO 120A

NANO 120B

GE

GE

GE

Recommended Course Sequence—Mechanical Engineering Focus

Fall

Winter

Spring

Junior Year

NANO 102

NANO 104

NANO 103

NANO 108

MAE 130A

MAE 131A

ECE 35

ECE 65

MAE 130B

GE

GE

GE

Senior Year

NANO 110

NANO 111

NANO 112

CENG 101A

NANO 120A

NANO 120B

MAE 105

NE Elective

NE Elective

GE

GE

GE

Recommended Course Sequence—Materials Science Focus

Fall

Winter

Spring

Junior Year

NANO 102

NANO 104

NANO 103

ECE 35

ECE 65

NANO 148

NANO 108

NANO 150

NE Elective

GE

GE

GE

Senior Year

NANO 110

NANO 111

NANO 112

NANO 158

NANO 120A

NANO 120B

NE Elective

NANO 161

NANO 168

GE

GE

GE

Admission to NanoEngineering

Effective fall 2014, NanoEngineering has been granted impacted status for freshman applications. Impacted status will take effect for continuing and transfer students beginning fall 2015.

Freshman Students

As the NanoEngineering major is impacted for incoming freshmen beginning fall 2014, students who have excelled in high school and have declared NanoEngineering on their UC San Diego application are eligible for direct admission into the major.

The UC San Diego Office of Admissions and Relations with Schools will calculate an admissions target number and admit the appropriate number of incoming freshmen into the impacted major using the UC San Diego Holistic Review score as a ranking method. Students who meet the UC San Diego admission criteria will be admitted into their chosen impacted major, starting with the student having the highest holistic review score, until the admission target number is reached. These students will be notified directly by the Office of Admissions and Relations with Schools whether they have been admitted into their chosen impacted major. Freshman students who applied but were not admitted directly from high school into the impacted NanoEngineering major will be admitted into the major indicated as their second choice on the UC application (providing it is an “open” major).

Continuing Freshmen (admitted fall 2014)

Freshmen not directly admitted into the NanoEngineering major will need to apply using the continuing application after their first three quarters (end of spring quarter) or after the end of their sixth quarter (end of spring quarter). A certain number of continuing students who apply will be selected to enter the impacted NanoEngineering major. 

Continuing students will be required to complete the following courses prior to applying:

NANOENGINEERING FRESHMEN

(must apply after three quarters)

Math 20A, 20B, 20C, Phys 2A, Chemistry 6A, 6B, 6C

NANOENGINEERING SOPHOMORES

(must apply after six quarters)

Math 20A, 20B, 20C, 20D, 20F, Phys 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D, Chemistry 6A, 6B, 6C, 7

Upon completion of these courses and an online application, students will receive information via e-mail from the Department of NanoEngineering Student Affairs Office. Applications will be ranked according to the GPA obtained in the required courses.

Applications to an impacted major will be approved, starting with the student having the highest GPA in the required courses, until the predetermined target number is reached. The Department of NanoEngineering Student Affairs Office will notify students in a timely manner who are successful in transitioning into an impacted major to officially declare the appropriate major online via the “Major/Minor” link under “Toolbox” at http://tritonlink.ucsd.edu.

Continuing students who apply and are unable to transition into an impacted major will also be notified of their status in a timely manner by the NanoEngineering Student Affairs Office.

Transfer Students (admitted fall 2015)

Transfer students can apply to switch into NanoEngineering at the end of their third quarter (spring quarter 2016). Transfer students who are past their third quarter at UC San Diego are not eligible to apply. An online application will be available, and the department will review the applications based on the following criteria (courses taken at UC San Diego) and GPA.

NANOENGINEERING TRANSFERS

(must apply after three quarters)

Math 20A, 20B, 20C, 20D, 20F, Phys 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D, Chemistry 6A, 6B, 6C, 7L

Academic Advising

Upon admission to the major, students should consult the catalog or NanoEngineering website (http://nanoengineering.ucsd.edu) for their program of study or their undergraduate adviser if they have questions. The program plan may be revised in subsequent years, but revisions involving curricular requirements require approval by the undergraduate adviser or the Undergraduate Affairs Committee. Because some course and/or curricular changes may be made every year, it is imperative that students consult with the department’s undergraduate adviser on an annual basis.

As aforementioned, Nanoengineering and Chemical Engineering courses are offered only once a year and therefore should be taken in the recommended sequence. If courses are taken out of sequence, it may not always be possible to enroll in courses as desired or needed. If this occurs, students should seek immediate departmental advice. When a student deviates from the sequence of courses specified for each curriculum in this catalog, it may be impossible to complete the major within the nominal four-year period.

In addition to the advising available through the Student Affairs Office, programmatic or technical advice may be obtained from faculty members.

Program Alterations/Exceptions to Requirements

Variations from or exceptions to any program or course requirements are possible only if the Undergraduate Affairs Committee approves a petition before the courses in question are taken. Petition forms may be obtained from the Student Affairs Office and must be processed through this office.

Independent Study

Students may take NANO 199, Independent Study for Undergraduates, under the guidance of a NanoEngineering faculty member. This course is taken as an elective on a P/NP basis. Eligible students must have completed at least ninety units and must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better. The two NANO 199s must be done in consecutive quarters and the student must find a faculty member who will oversee the research project. After obtaining the faculty member’s concurrence on the topic and scope of the study, the student must submit a Special Studies Course form (each quarter) and a NANO 199 Contract form to the Undergraduate Affairs Committee. These forms must be completed, approved, and processed prior to the add deadline. After the second quarter is completed, the student must submit an Undergraduate Student Petition to have the work accepted as two NanoEngineering elective courses. A final report must be attached to the petition for the faculty member and Undergraduate Affairs Committee to review. Detailed policy in this regard and the requisite forms may be obtained from the Student Affairs Office.

Transfer Students

The undergraduate engineering curriculum is designed to integrate four years of college educational experience. It will take transfer students three years to complete the major requirements, beyond their junior-college work, for the NanoEngineering Program. Most students need to take Math 20E (Vector Calculus) at a UC. Transfer students must take NANO 1 and NANO 101 concurrently in their first winter quarter. Students cannot start the junior year of NANO courses until they have taken NANO 101. Students should consult their adviser for a transition program compatible with their junior college preparation.

Requirements for admission as a Nanoengineering major or into Nanoengineering courses are the same for transfer students as they are for continuing students (see section on “Acceptance to Departmental Majors in the Jacobs School of Engineering” in this catalog). Accordingly, when planning their program, transfer students should be mindful of lower-division prerequisite course requirements, as well as for meeting collegiate requirements.

Students who have taken equivalent courses elsewhere may request to have transfer credit apply toward the department’s major requirements. To receive transfer credit, complete an Undergraduate Student Petition and submit it to Student Affairs. For mathematics, chemistry, and physics, the respective department determines transfer equivalencies. An Undergraduate Student Petition form must be submitted to each department from which you are requesting transfer credit.

Transfer students start in their first year in the NanoEngineering major by taking NANO 15 in fall quarter if they don’t have a transferable programming course, and NANO 1 and NANO 101 in winter quarter. NANO 1 and 15 have no prerequisites. NANO 101 has prerequisites of Physics 2B and Chem 6B. NANO 101 is a prerequisite for the next NANO courses in the major.

The following courses are strongly recommended for all engineering transfer students for success in their major.

Contiguous BS/MS Program

A contiguous, terminal program leading to a bachelor of science and a masters in NanoEngineering is offered to a student with junior standing who has an upper-division GPA of 3.5 or better and a 3.0 overall UC San Diego GPA.

During the last quarter of their junior year (more specifically, the fourth quarter prior to the receipt of the BS), students interested in obtaining the MS within one year following receipt of the BS may apply to the Department of NanoEngineering for admission to the program. Students must submit three letters of reference from their professors with their application.

Students will meet the requirements of both the BS and MS programs, such as courses and credits. There are no overlaps in courses. Upon completion of the BS/MS program, students are not automatically eligible for admission to the PhD program.

Chemical Engineering

BUSINESS AFFAIRS:
240 Structural Materials Engineering Building, Warren College

STUDENT AFFAIRS:
Undergraduate Affairs: 241A and B Structural Materials Engineering Building, Warren College

Graduate Affairs: 240A Structural Materials Engineering Building, Warren College

http://nanoengineering.ucsd.edu

Departmental Focus

The Department of NanoEngineering is the administrative home of the interdepartmental Chemical Engineering Program (CENG).

Undergraduate Program

The BS program in Chemical Engineering (CENG) is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET/EAC).

Chemical Engineering Program (CENG)

Program Objectives

The Chemical Engineering Program has affiliated faculty from the Department of NanoEngineering, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and the Department of Bioengineering. The curricula at both the undergraduate and graduate levels are designed to support and foster chemical engineering as a profession that interfaces engineering and all aspects of basic sciences (physics, chemistry, and biology).

The primary educational objectives of the Chemical Engineering Program are to

The curriculum is designed to prepare Chemical Engineering graduates for further education and personal development through their entire professional career. We strive to accomplish these goals by providing a rigorous and demanding curriculum that incorporates lectures, discussions, laboratory and project development experiences in basic sciences, mathematics, engineering sciences, and design as well as the humanities and social sciences.

The Undergraduate Program

The BS program in Chemical Engineering is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET/EAC). The curriculum is tailored to provide breadth and flexibility by taking advantage of the strength of basic sciences and other engineering disciplines at UC San Diego. The intention is to graduate chemical engineers who are multidisciplinary practitioners and can work in a broad spectrum of industries rather than solely traditional chemical and petrochemical industries.

Areas of specialization are available whereby a graduate can be in a position for a career in environmental technology, microelectronic device fabrication, materials and polymer processing, pharmaceutical and biotechnology, biomedical engineering, energy and thermal systems, control and system engineering, and so forth.

For students who aspire to pursue a graduate degree and a career in research and development, the units in an area of specialization can be allocated to more fundamental science and engineering courses. These students are also encouraged to perform independent projects in one of the faculty research laboratories or groups.

Whether the career goal is industry or graduate or professional school, the curriculum has a strong emphasis on developing problem-solving skills and the ability to think and learn independently. The capstone courses are the senior design and process lab courses. Students learn to participate in project teams, refine their communication skills, and work on various design and experimental projects that, over two quarters, introduce them to elements of project planning, execution, analysis, and improvement.

Entering freshmen will follow the new set of course work guidelines detailed in this section. Continuing students will continue with their current set of course work guidelines outlined in previous general catalogs. The Student Affairs Office can provide the proper curriculum tables. All students are encouraged to visit the Student Affairs Office or visit the Department of NanoEngineering website for any clarification and updated information.

Deviations from these programs of study must be approved by the Undergraduate Affairs Committee prior to taking alternative courses. In addition, technical elective (TE) course selections must have departmental approval prior to students' taking the courses. The TE courses are restricted to meet ABET standards. Courses such as CENG 195, 197, and 198 are not allowed as a technical elective in meeting the upper-division major requirements. CENG 199 can be used as a technical elective only under restrictive conditions. Policy regarding these conditions may be obtained from the department’s Student Affairs Office. To graduate, students must maintain an overall GPA of at least 2.0, and the department requires at least a C– grade in each course required for the major.

Students with different academic preparation may vary the scheduling of lower-division courses such as math, physics, and chemistry, but should consult the department. Deviations in scheduling Chemical Engineering upper-division courses are discouraged and require prior approval. Most lower-division courses are offered more than once each year to permit students some flexibility in their program scheduling. However, all Chemical Engineering upper-division courses are taught only once per year, and courses are scheduled to be consistent with the curricula as shown in the tables.

General-Education/College Requirements

For graduation, each student must satisfy general-education course requirements determined by the student’s college as well as the major requirements determined by the department. The six colleges at UC San Diego require widely different general-education courses, and the number of such courses differs from one college to another. Each student should choose his or her college carefully, considering the special nature of the college and the breadth of general education.

The CENG program allows for general-education (GE) courses so that students can fulfill their college requirements. As an ABET accredited program, students must develop a program that includes a total of at least twenty-four units in the arts, humanities, and social sciences, not including subjects such as accounting, industrial management, finance, or personnel administration. Students must consult with their college to determine which GE courses to take.

Professional Licensing

After graduation, all students are encouraged to take the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) examination as the first step in becoming licensed as a professional engineer (PE). Students graduating from our accredited program can take the PE examination after FE certification and two years of work experience; students graduating from a non-accredited program can take the PE examination after FE certification and four years of work experience.

For further information please contact your local Board of Registration for Professional Engineers and Land Surveyors.

Major Requirements

To receive a BS in Chemical Engineering, students must complete 199* units for graduation, which includes 48* units of general-education (GE) requirements of their colleges and the ABET requirements in the arts, humanities, and social sciences. The balance consists of basic sciences (fifty-four units), chemistry core (twenty units), Chemical Engineering core (thirty-two units), process laboratory and design (sixteen units), general engineering (1welve units), and an area of specialization (sixteen units). Beyond the fifty-three units of basic sciences, the science and engineering courses total to ninety-six units. A one-unit introductory seminar (CENG 1) is required of all incoming freshmen.

*The 199 units for graduation and 48 units of GE requirements are shown for Warren College students as an example to fulfill the general education requirements. Students in other colleges need to adjust the plan to match their own college requirements.

The specific breakdown is as follows:

Basic sciences (fifty-four units):

This lower-division requirement includes twenty-four units of mathematics (Math 20A–F), fourteen units of physics (Phys 2A–C, 2CL), and sixteen units of chemistry (Chem 6A–C, 7L).

Chemistry core (twenty units):

Five advanced chemistry electives must be selected from among Chem 131, 132, 133, 140A-B, 114A-B (or BIBC 100, BIBC 102), 120 A-B, and 143A. (Note: Students may not receive credit for both BIBC 100 and Chem 114A, or BIBC 102 and Chem 114B). Two recommended options are Chem 140A-B, 114A-B (or BIBC 100, BIBC 102), and 143A for those interested in biochemical/organic; and Chem 131, 132, 133, 120A, and 140A for those interested in inorganic/materials.

Chemical engineering core (thirty-two units):

This requirement covers chemical process modeling, solution thermodynamics, transport phenomena, chemical reaction engineering, process control, and unit operations (CENG 100, 101A-C, 102, 113, 120, 122).

Process laboratory and design (sixteen units):

This requirement is crucial to fulfill the ABET design content (CENG 124A-B, 176A-B).

General engineering (twelve units):

This requirement covers basics in computer programming, probability and statistics, and instrumentation. The computer programming requirement should be satisfied with a course in Matlab (CENG 15). Probability and statistics can be satisfied with ECE 109 or a course with equivalent content. Instrumentation is satisfied with MAE 170.

Electives in an area of specialization (sixteen units):

Electives are intended to broaden and enhance professional goals. They may be chosen to achieve either breadth or depth in one’s education. All electives must be upper-division courses in engineering. Suggestions are listed below.

Biotechnology/Biochemical Engineering

BENG 161A-B (Requires petition with the Department of Bioengineering. Requires prerequisites, including Chem 114A-B or BIBC 100, BIBC 102.)

Microelectronic Devices and Materials

ECE 103, 134, 135A, 136L

Engineering Mechanics

MAE 130A-B, 131A, 160

Engineering Science

MAE 104, 105, 107, 140, 149

Environmental Engineering

MAE 119, 122, 124/ ESYS 103,* 125B, 126A-B, MAE 127

*TE credit cannot be given for both MAE 124 and ESYS 103.

Materials Science and Engineering

NANO 100L, NANO 174, ECE 134, MATS 201A-B-C, 205A, 227

Nanotechnology

NANO 101,* 102, 103, 104, 108, 110, 111, 112, 140, 145, 146, 148, 150, 156,* 158, 161, 162, 164, 168

MAE 168

CENG 207/ NANO 243, CENG 208, CENG 211/ NANO 201,* CENG 212, 213, 214, 215, NANO 253/ MAE 267, MATS 253

*NANO 156 and MAE 166 are cross-listed courses; CENG majors must enroll in NANO 156, not MAE 166.

*TE credit cannot be given for both CENG 211/ NANO 201 and NANO 101; CENG 207 and NANO 243; NANO 253, MAE 267, and MATS 253.

*NANO 253, MATS 253, and MAE 267 are cross-listed courses; CENG majors are required to take NANO 253.

Process Dynamics and Control

MAE 140, 142, MAE 143A, 143C, 149, 180A, ECE 171B, BENG 122A

Thermal Engineering and Systems

MAE 113, 101B, 118, 119, 120

Independent Research

CENG 199 as equivalent to a senior thesis can be approved as equivalent to two elective courses (eight units). Consult department Student Affairs Office for details.

Principles of Team Engineering

ENG 100A/L or ENG 100B/L, Teams in Engineering Service 

One, four-unit technical elective, is approved for completion of ENG 100A and ENG 100L, or ENG 100B and ENG 100L. A student must petition before taking the courses to get a second, four-unit technical elective of ENG 100A and ENG 100L, or ENG 100B and ENG 100L, or two more quarters of ENG 100L. A written summary must be submitted with the petition and must include details of the completed project and how taking a second quarter of ENG 100 will be beneficial for the project. For more information, see the Global TIES website: http://globalties.ucsd.edu/.

Chemical Engineering
(ABET Accredited Program)

Fall

Winter

Spring

Freshman Year

Math 20A

Math 20B

Math 20C

Chem 6A

Phys 2A

Phys 2B

CENG 15

Chem 6B

Chem 6C/7L

GE1

 

GE

CENG 1

GE

 

Sophomore Year

Math 20D

Math 20F

Math 20E

CENG 100

CENG 102

CENG 113

Phys 2C/2CL

Adv Chem2

Adv Chem

GE

GE

GE

Junior Year

CENG 101A

CENG 101B

CENG 101C

MAE 170

ECE 1093

AS4

Adv Chem

Adv Chem

Adv Chem

GE

GE

GE

Senior Year

CENG 1205

CENG 124A

CENG 124B

CENG 122

CENG 176A

CENG 176B

AS

AS

AS

GE

GE6

GE

1General-education (GE) requirements: The forty-eight units are shown for Warren College students as an example to fulfill the general education requirements. Students in other colleges need to adjust the plan to match their own college requirements.

2Five advanced chemistry electives must be selected from among Chem. 131, 132, 133, 140A-B, 114A-B (or BIBC 100, BIBC 102), and 120 A-B, and 143A. (Note: Students may not receive credit for both BIBC 100 and Chem 114A, or BIBC 102 and Chem 114B).

Two recommended options are Chem. 140A-B, 114A-B (or BIBC 100, BIBC 102), and 143A for those interested in biochemical/organic, and Chem. 131, 132, 133, 120A, and 140A for those interested in inorganic/materials. 

3The approved equivalent courses for ECE 109 are Math 183, Math 186, Math 181A (Math 180A is a prerequisite), MAE 108, ECON 120A and BIEB 100 (BILD 3 is a prerequisite). (Note: If a grade below a C– is received, students may repeat the same course to replace the grade or students may keep the grade but take an alternative statistics course on the list for C– or better to satisfy the requirement.)

4The electives in an area of specialization (AS) must be upper-division or graduate courses in engineering, based on the preapproved sequences. Otherwise, the selections must receive prior approval of the department to meet ABET standards.

5If a student chooses process control as the area of specialization, CENG 120 can be replaced by a relevant course within the approved set of courses for specialization in process control.

6If students do not require these additional GE courses to meet their college requirements, they may substitute an unrestricted elective in order to meet the minimum 199-unit graduation requirement. The twelfth GE course is intended only for students who have additional college requirements to fulfill. The forty-eight units are shown for Warren College students as an example to fulfill the general education requirements. Students in other colleges need to adjust the plan to match their own college requirements. To meet ABET requirements, students must have up to twenty-four units in the arts, humanities, and social sciences, not including subjects such as accounting, industrial management, finance, and personnel administration.

Admission to Chemical Engineering

Effective fall 2014, Chemical Engineering has been granted impacted status for freshman applications. Impacted status will take effect for continuing and transfer students beginning fall 2015.

Freshman Students

As the Chemical Engineering major is impacted for incoming freshmen beginning fall 2014, students who have excelled in high school and have declared Chemical Engineering on their UC San Diego application are eligible for direct admission into the major.

The UC San Diego Office of Admissions and Relations with Schools will calculate an admissions target number and admit the appropriate number of incoming freshmen into the impacted major using the UC San Diego Holistic Review score as a ranking method. Students who meet the UC San Diego admission criteria will be admitted into their chosen impacted major, starting with the student having the highest holistic review score, until the admission target number is reached. These students will be notified directly by the Office of Admissions and Relations with Schools whether they have been admitted into their chosen impacted major.

Freshman students who applied but were not admitted directly from high school into the impacted Chemical Engineering major will be admitted into the major indicated as their second choice”on the UC application (providing it is an “open” major).

Continuing Freshmen (admitted fall 2014)

Freshmen not directly admitted into the Chemical Engineering major will need to apply using the continuing application after their first three quarters (end of spring quarter) or after the end of their sixth quarter (end of spring quarter). A certain number of continuing students who apply will be selected to enter the impacted Chemical Engineering major. 

Continuing students will be required to complete the following courses prior to applying:

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING FRESHMEN

(must apply after three quarters)

Math 20A, 20B, 20C, Phys 2A, 2B, Chemistry 6A, 6B, 6C, 7L

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING SOPHOMORES

(must apply after six quarters)

Math 20A, 20B, 20C, 20D, 20F, Phys 2A, 2B, 2C, 2CL, Chemistry 6A, 6B, 6C, 7L

Upon completion of these courses and online application, students will receive information via e-mail from the Department of NanoEngineering Student Affairs Office. Applications will be ranked according to the GPA obtained in the required courses.

Applications to an impacted major will be approved, starting with the student having the highest GPA in the required courses, until the predetermined target number is reached. The Department of NanoEngineering Student Affairs Office will notify students in a timely manner who are successful in transitioning into an impacted major to officially declare the appropriate major online via the “Major/Minor” link under “Toolbox” at http://tritonlink.ucsd.edu.

Continuing students who apply and are unable to transition into an impacted major will also be notified of their status in a timely manner by the Department of NanoEngineering Student Affairs Office.

TRANSFER STUDENTS (admitted fall 2015)

Transfer students can apply to switch into the Chemical Engineering at the end of their third quarter. Transfer students who are past their third quarter at UC San Diego are not eligible to apply. An online application will be available, and the department will review the applications based on the following criteria (courses taken at UC San Diego) and GPA.

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING TRANSFERS

(must apply after three quarters)

Math 20A, 20B, 20C, 20D, 20F; Phys 2A, 2B, 2C, 2CL; Chemistry 6A, 6B, 6C, 7L

Academic Advising

Upon admission to the major, students should consult the catalog or Department of NanoEngineering website (http://nanoengineering.ucsd.edu) for their program of study or their undergraduate adviser if they have questions. The program plan may be revised in subsequent years, but revisions involving curricular requirements require approval by the undergraduate adviser or the Undergraduate Affairs Committee. Because some course and/or curricular changes may be made every year, it is imperative that students consult with the department’s undergraduate adviser on an annual basis.

Chemical Engineering courses are offered only once a year and therefore should be taken in the recommended sequence. If courses are taken out of sequence, it may not always be possible to enroll in courses as desired or needed. If this occurs, students should seek immediate departmental advice. When a student deviates from the sequence of courses specified for each curriculum in this catalog, it may be impossible to complete a Chemical Engineering major within the normal four-year period.

In addition to the advising available through the Student Affairs Office, programmatic or technical advice may be obtained from Chemical Engineering faculty members.

Program Alterations/Exceptions to Requirements

Variations from or exceptions to any program or course requirements are possible only if a petition is approved by the Undergraduate Affairs Committee before the courses in question are taken. Petition forms may be obtained from the Student Affairs Office and must be processed through this office.

Independent Study

Chemical Engineering students may take CENG 199, Independent Study for Undergraduates, under the guidance of a Chemical Engineering faculty member. This course is taken as an elective on a P/NP basis. Eligible students must have completed at least ninety units and must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better. The two CENG 199s must be done in consecutive quarters and the student must find a faculty member who will oversee the research project. After obtaining the faculty member’s concurrence on the topic and scope of the study, the student must submit a Special Studies form (each quarter) and CENG 199 contract form to the Undergraduate Affairs Committee. These forms must be completed, approved, and processed prior to the add deadline. After the second quarter is completed, the student must submit an Undergraduate Student Petition to have the work accepted as two technical elective courses. A final report must be attached to the petition for the faculty member and Undergraduate Affairs Committee to review. Detailed policy in this regard and the requisite forms may be obtained from the Student Affairs Office.

Transfer Students

The Chemical Engineering curriculum is designed to integrate four years of college educational experience. It is not easy for transfer students to complete the major requirements in only two additional years beyond their junior college work. However, if transfer students seek a college for which they already satisfy the general-education requirements, have taken the lower-division science and mathematics, and have completed some advanced chemistry requirement, then the rigorous first-year schedule below will permit them to graduate in two years. Other students should consult their adviser for a transition program compatible with their junior college preparation.

Requirements for admission as a Chemical Engineering major or minor, or into Chemical Engineering courses, are the same for transfer students as they are for continuing students. Accordingly, when planning their program, transfer students should be mindful of lower-division prerequisite course requirements, as well as for meeting collegiate requirements.

Students who have taken equivalent courses elsewhere may request to have transfer credit apply toward the department’s major requirements. To receive transfer credit, complete an Undergraduate Student Petition form and submit it to Student Affairs. For mathematics, chemistry and physics, transfer equivalencies are determined by the respective departments. An Undergraduate Student Petition form must be submitted to each department from which the student is requesting transfer credit.

Effective fall 2009, these courses are strongly recommended for all engineering transfer students for success in their major.

All transfer students must take CENG 15 (Matlab) in the fall of their first year at UC San Diego. Transfer students may petition to take CENG 15 concurrently with CENG 100, and CENG 101A concurrently with Math 20E. Complete a Student Petition form and submit it to Student Affairs. 

If students do not come in with all the above courses, it will most likely take three years to graduate. For the three-year/four-year curriculum, please go to http://ne.ucsd.edu/undergrad-programs/degree/bs-chemical-engineering/curriculum. Community college equivalent courses can be found at http://www.assist.org.

Fall

Winter

Spring

Junior Year

Adv Chem*

Adv Chem

Adv Chem

CENG 101A

CENG 101B

CENG 101C

CENG 100

CENG 102

CENG 113

CENG 15**

ECE 109

MAE 170

CENG 1    

*If you have not completed Math 20E at the community college, then you may take an Advanced Chemistry course another quarter. You must complete a petition to take Math 20E concurrently with CENG 101A. Click here for more information about petitions.  

**Incoming transfer students must take CENG 15 in the fall and complete a petition to take it concurrently with CENG 100. Click here for more information about petitions.  

Program Accreditation

The BS program in Chemical Engineering is accredited by the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET/EAC).