Literature

[ undergraduate program | graduate program | faculty ]

All courses, faculty listings, and curricular and degree requirements described herein are subject to change or deletion without notice. Updates may be found on the Academic Senate website: http://senate.ucsd.edu/catalog-copy/approved-updates/.

Courses

For course descriptions not found in the UC San Diego General Catalog, 2014–15, please contact the department for more information.

CHINESE LITERATURE

Upper Division

Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites may be specified below.

LTCH 101. Readings in Contemporary Chinese Literature (4)

Intended for students who have the competence to read contemporary Chinese texts, poetry, short stories, and criticism in vernacular Chinese. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

Graduate

Prerequisites: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

LTCO 201. Theories and Methods of Literary Analysis (4)

Contemporary theories of the significance of literary form. The seminar will concentrate on major interpretive approaches drawn from several areas of literary, cultural, and political analysis, including Marxist theory, feminism, psychoanalytic theory, postcolonial studies, LGBT studies, diaspora studies, and others. The particular focus and approach may vary. Nongraduate students may enroll with consent of instructor.

LTCO 202C. History of European Criticism and Aesthetics (4)

A core course for comparative literature, strongly recommended for all graduate students in the comparative literature program. A historical survey of criticism and aesthetics divided as follows: 202C, Romanticism to late nineteenth century.

LTCO 210. Classical Studies (4)

Analysis of significant works of the Greek and Roman traditions, with attention to their interest for later European literature. S/U grades only. May be taken for credit three times as topics vary.

LTCO 214. The Bible and Critical Theory (4)

Reading biblical texts (Hebrew Bible and New Testament) from the perspective of different theoretical methods in literary criticism and cultural studies. Theoretical coverage will vary but may include, for example, postmodernist, postcolonialist, psychoanalytic, gender, and ideological readings of biblical texts.

LTCO 252. Modernism (4)

A sample investigation into the concept of period. Will deal with the question of the existence of modernism, the description of the phenomenon, and the causes to which it is to be attributed. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTCO 274. Genre Studies (4)

A consideration of a representative selection of works relating to a theme, form, or literary genre. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTCO 281. Literature and Film (4)

A study of literature and film in relation to one another, to critical and aesthetic theories, and to historical context. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

LTCO 282. Literature and Philosophy (4)

Questions and problems from the history of philosophy or from the various fields of philosophy (e.g., epistemology, ethics, logic) in their interaction with intellectual issues and questions addressed by literary criticism and theory. Repeatable for credit when topics vary.

LTCO 283. Literature and Political Philosophy (4)

An inquiry into philosophical texts viewed as influential in comparative literature and political science (Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Machiavelli, More, Hobbes, Locke, Hume, Kant, Herder, Hegel, Nietzsche, Kojeve, Foucault, Rawls, et al.). May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTCO 285. Literature and Aesthetics (4)

Research in literary theory and aesthetic philosophies. Single and multiple authors and topics; Plato and Aristotle, Renaissance treatises, Winckleman, Kant and Hegel in the Enlightenment, Warburg, Heidegger and Panofsky, contemporary art theory, et al. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTCO 286. Topics in Islam and Modernity (4)

A survey of developments in the Islamic world during the period of European colonial domination and its aftermath, with special attention to the works of leading Muslim thinkers (e.g., Sayid Ahmed Khan, Muhammad Abduh, Hasan al Banna, Ruhallah Khomeini, among others). May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTCO 287. Culture and Political Theory (4)

A comparative approach of political theory based on historical periods (with the tools of new historicism), various cultures (inspired by anthropological research), and referring to the most important philosophical thinkers from Western and non-Western traditions. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTCO 295. MA Thesis (1–8)

Research for the master’s thesis. Opened for repeated registration up to eight units. (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grades only.) Prerequisites: enrolled in MA program.

LTCO 296. Research Practicum (1–12)

Research project to be developed by a small group of students under the continued direction of individual faculty members. Primarily a continuation of a previous graduate seminar. The 296 courses do not count toward the seminar requirement. Repeatable for credit.

LTCO 297. Directed Studies: Reading Course (1–12)

This course may be designed according to an individual student’s needs when seminar offerings do not cover subjects, genres, or authors of interest. No paper required. The 297 courses do not count toward the seminar requirement. Repeatable for credit.

LTCO 298. Special Projects: Writing Course (1–12)

Similar to a 297, but a paper is required. Papers are usually on subjects not covered by seminar offerings. Up to two 298s may be applied toward the twelve-seminar requirement of the doctoral program. Repeatable for credit.

LTCO 299. Dissertation (1–12)

Research for the dissertation. Offered for repeated registration. Open only to PhD students who have advanced to candidacy.

LITERATURE/CULTURAL STUDIES

Lower Division

LTCS 50. Introduction to Cultural Studies (4)

An introduction to cultural studies with a focus on the following areas: literary and historical studies, popular culture, women’s studies, ethnic studies, science studies, and gay/lesbian studies. Particular emphasis on the question of “cultural practices” and their social and political conditions and effects.

LTCS 52. Topics in Cultural Studies (4)

This course is designed to complement LTCS 50, Introduction to Cultural Studies. In this course, cultural studies methods are further introduced and applied to various concrete topics in order to illustrate the practical analysis of culture and cultural forms.

LTCS 87. Freshman Seminar (1)

The Freshman Seminar Program is designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small seminar setting. Freshman Seminars are offered in all campus departments and undergraduate colleges, and topics vary from quarter to quarter. Enrollment is limited to fifteen to twenty students, with preference given to entering freshmen. Prerequisites: none.

LTCS 98. Directed Group Studies (4)

Directed group study on a topic or in a field not included in the regular department curriculum by special arrangement with a faculty member. (P/NP only.) Prerequisites: lower-division standing, completion of at least thirty units of undergraduate study at UC San Diego, minimum 3.0 GPA at UC San Diego, consent of instructor, and completed and approved Special Studies form.

Upper Division

Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites may be specified below.

LTCS 100. Theories and Methods in Cultural Studies (4)

Reading in some of the major theoretical texts that have framed work in cultural studies, with particular emphasis on those drawn from critical theory, studies in colonialism, cultural anthropology, feminism, semiotics, gay/lesbian studies, historicism, and psychoanalytic theory.

LTCS 102. Practicing Cultural Studies (4)

Survey and application of methods central to cultural studies as a critical social practice, examining the relationship between cultural studies and social transformation. Students will study varieties of material culture, and experiment with techniques of reading, interpretation, and intervention.

LTCS 110. Popular Culture (4)

A reading of recent theory on popular culture and a study of particular texts dealing with popular cultural practices, both contemporary and noncontemporary, as sites of conflict and struggle. Repeatable for credit when topics vary.

LTCS 111. Special Topics in Popular Culture in Historical Context (4)

Exploration of forms of popular culture in different historical and geographical contexts. Topics may include: folklore, dime novels and other types of popular literature, racial performances, popular religions, theatrical melodrama, photojournalism, and early film. Repeatable for credit when readings and focus vary.

LTCS 118. Comedy (4)

Comedy in fiction and film from ancient times to contemporary, including the Bible, Aristophanes, Shakespeare, and modern writers and film makers.

LTCS 120. Historical Perspectives on Culture (4)

The course will explore the relation among cultural production, institutions, history, and ideology during selected historical periods. In considering different kinds of texts, relations of power and knowledge at different historical moments will be discussed. Repeatable for credit when topics vary.

LTCS 125. Cultural Perspectives on Immigration and Citizenship (4)

Introduction to the studies of cultural dimensions of immigration and citizenship. Examines the diverse cultural texts—literature, law, film, music, the televisual images, etc.—that both shape and are shaped by immigration and the idea of citizenship in different national and historical contexts.

LTCS 130. Gender, Race/Ethnicity, Class, and Culture (4)

The course will focus on the representation of gender, ethnicity, and class in cultural production in view of various contemporary theories of race, sex, and class. Repeatable for credit when topics vary.

LTCS 131. Topics in Queer Cultures/Queer Subcultures (4)

This course examines the intersection of sex, sexuality, and popular culture by looking at the history of popular representations of queer sexuality and their relation to political movements for gay and lesbian rights. Repeatable for credit when readings and focus vary.

LTCS 132. Special Topics in Social Identities and the Media (4)

A study of media representation and various aspects of identity, such as gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, social class, culture, and geopolitical location. Students will consider the various media of film, television, alternative video, advertising, music, and the Internet. Repeatable for credit when readings and focus vary.

LTCS 133. Globalization and Culture (4)

Studies of cultural dimensions of immigration and citizenship. This course examines the diverse cultural texts—literature, law, film, music, the televisual images, etc., that both shape and are shaped by immigration and the idea of citizenship in different national and historical contexts.

LTCS 135. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies (4)

Introduction to interdisciplinary examination of human sexuality and, especially, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender identities and desires. Juxtaposes perspectives from humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. Introduces queer theory to understand sexuality in relation to phenomena such as government, family, culture, medicine, race, gender, and class.

LTCS 141. Special Topics in Race and Empire (4)

The role of race and culture within the history of empires; may select a single empire for consideration, such as France, Britain, U.S., or Japan, or choose to examine the role of race and culture in comparative histories of colonialism. Repeatable for credit when readings and focus vary.

LTCS 145. National Cultures in Colonial and Postcolonial Contexts (4)

Studies of emergence of national cultures under colonial rule and their transformations in the process of decolonization. Investigation of ideological constructions of such cultural institutions as modern national language, national history and histiography, national literary canon, and folk literature and culture.

LTCS 150. Topics in Cultural Studies (4)

The course will examine one or more forms of cultural production or cultural practice from a variety of theoretical and historical perspectives. Topics may include: contemporary debates on culture, genres of popular music/fiction/film, AIDS and culture, the history of sexuality, subcultural styles, etc. Repeatable for credit when topics vary.

LTCS 160. Cultural Studies Approaches to Popular Music (4)

An investigation of different types of popular music genres, cultures, and practices such as hip hop, punk rock, R&B, jazz, country, and dance music cultures. From the perspective of ethnography and cultural and performance studies, the course explores race, gender, sexuality, and the negotiations of local, as well as national communities and subcultures via popular music.

LTCS 165. Special Topics: The Politics of Food

This course will examine the representation and politics of food in literary and other cultural texts. Topics may include: food and poverty, the fast food industry, controversies about seed, sustainable food production, myths about hunger, eating and epistemology, aesthetics, etc. Repeatable for credit up to three times when topics vary.

LTCS 170. Visual Culture (4)

The course will focus on visual practices and discourses in their intersection and overlap, from traditional media, print, and photography to film, video, TV, computers, medical scanners, and the Internet.

LTCS 171. Topics in Television and Popular Media (4)

Examining the relationship between television and national culture, students will study the emergence of TV as a domestic technology, the history of race and gender in television programming, and the global politics of television distribution. Repeatable for credit when readings and focus vary.

LTCS 172. Special Topics in Screening Race/Ethnicity, Gender and Sexuality (4)

Exploring both Hollywood and international filmmaking, an exploration of screen representations with attention to race/ethnicity, gender, and sexuality in different historical and linguistic contexts. Historical periods may extend from silent, through wartime and cold war, to contemporary era of globalization. Repeatable for credit when readings and focus vary.

LTCS 173. Topics in Violence and Visual Culture (4)

This course focuses on the critical study of representations of violence, such as war, genocide, sexual violence, and crime, across a range of media, including literature, film, photography, and other forms of visual culture. Repeatable for credit when readings and focus vary.

LTCS 192. Senior Seminar in Literatures in Cultural Studies (1)

The Senior Seminar Program is designed to allow senior undergraduates to meet with faculty members in a small group setting to explore an intellectual topic in literature (at the upper-division level). Senior Seminars may be offered in all campus departments. Topics will vary from quarter to quarter. Senior Seminars may be taken for credit up to four times, with a change in topic, and permission of the department. Enrollment is limited to twenty students, with preference given to seniors. Prerequisites: department stamp and/or consent of instructor.

LTCS 198. Directed Group Study (4)

Directed group research, under the guidance of a member of the faculty, in an area not covered in courses currently offered by the department. (P/NP only.) Prerequisites: permission of the department.

LTCS 199. Special Studies (2 or 4)

Individual reading in an area not covered in courses currently offered by the department. (P/NP only.) Prerequisites: permission of the department.

Graduate

Prerequisites: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

LTCS 210. History and Culture (4)

This seminar will focus on the cultural practices of a particular historical period as a means of analyzing the relation between culture/ideology and economic and political modes of production and domination. Topic, historical period, and theoretical approach may vary. Repeatable for credit.

LTCS 220. Film/TV/Video Studies (4)

The seminar will concentrate on genres or subgenres within film/TV/video studies or on a stand of film/ TV/video theory. Possible topics may include: horror film, melodrama, sitcoms/soaps/talk shows, music videos, black or queer cinema, etc. Repeatable for credit.

LTCS 222. Topics in Theory and History of Film (4)

This course will consider various theoretical approaches to film texts (historical-materialist, feminist, psychoanalytic, semiotic) as well as the history of film, the political economy of film production and distribution, exhibition practices, and spectatorship in national and transnational contexts. Repeatable for credit when topics vary.

LTCS 225. Interdisciplinary and Historical Analysis of Cultural Texts (4)

The seminar will focus on a particular historical period and examine a variety of cultural texts vis-a-vis related historical, economic, political, and sociological discourses. The conjunction and disjunction of approaches will be explored in relation to specific texts. Repeatable for credit.

LTCS 250. Topics in Cultural Studies (4)

This seminar will be organized around any of various topic areas relating to cultural studies. These might include studies in colonialism, historicism, gender, sexuality, social institutions, popular culture, subaltern practices, etc. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTCS 255. Cultural Studies, Colonialism, and Decolonialism (4)

This course considers different approaches to the study of colonialism in a variety of national contexts. Educational, legal, religious, military, and cultural apparatuses of colonialism; theories of decolonization; the “postcolonial”; and feminist critiques of “modernity”/modernization will also be studied. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

LTCS 256. Cultural Studies of Technoscience (4)

The course will explore work in cultural studies, feminist studies, and queer theory of scientific practices altering social relations, cultural identities, and conceptions of “nature.” Issues may include the AIDS pandemic, genetic research, electronic communities, reproductive technologies, and other topics. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

LTCS 257. City, Literature, and Modernity (4)

This new course explores relationship between city, literature, and modernity. It examines this relationship through key writers such as Charles Dickens, Mikhail Bakhtin, Walter Benjamin, Fredrick Jameson, Naguib Mahfouz, John Rechy, and Georg Simmel. S/U grades only.

LTCS 260. National Cultures (4)

Selected topics on the construction of national cultural identities. Investigation of the dynamics of canon formation and nation building in specific historical contexts. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

LTCS 297. Directed Studies: Reading Course (1–12)

This course may be designed according to an individual student’s needs when seminar offerings do not cover subjects, genres, or authors of interest. No paper required. The 297 courses do not count toward the seminar requirement. Repeatable for credit.

LTCS 298. Special Projects: Writing Course (1–12)

Similar to a 297, but a paper is required. Papers are usually on subjects not covered by seminar offerings. Up to two 298s may be applied toward the twelve-seminar requirement of the doctoral program. Repeatable for credit.

LTCS 299. Dissertation (1–12)

Research toward the dissertation. Open only to PhD students who have advanced to candidacy. Repeatable for credit.

LITERATURES IN ENGLISH

Lower Division

LTEN 21. Introduction to the Literature of the British Isles: Pre-1660 (4)

An introduction to the literatures written in English in Britain before 1660, with a focus on the interaction of text and history.

LTEN 22. Introduction to the Literature of the British Isles: 1660–1832 (4)

An introduction to the literatures written in English in Britain and Ireland between 1660 and 1832, with a focus on the interaction of text and history.

LTEN 23. Introduction to the Literature of the British Isles: 1832–Present (4)

An introduction to the literatures written in English in Britain, Ireland, and the British Empire (and the former British Empire) from 1832 to the present, with a focus on the interaction of text and history.

LTEN 25. Introduction to the Literature of the United States, Beginnings to 1865 (4)

An introduction to the literatures written in English in the United States from the beginnings to 1865, with a focus on the interaction of text and history.

LTEN 26. Introduction to the Literature of the United States, 1865 to the Present (4)

An introduction to the literatures written in English in the United States from 1865 to the present, with a focus on the interaction of text and history.

LTEN 27. Introduction to African American Literature (4)

A lecture discussion course that examines a major topic or theme in African American literature as it is developed over time and across the literary genres of fiction, poetry, and belles lettres. A particular emphasis of the course is how African American writers have adhered to or departed from conventional definitions of genre.

LTEN 28. Introduction to Asian American Literature (4)

This course provides an introduction to the study of the history, communities, and cultures of different Asian American people in the United States. Students will examine different articulations, genres, conflicts, narrative forms, and characterizations of the varied Asian experience.

LTEN 29. Introduction to Chicano Literature (4)

This course provides an introduction to the literary production of the population of Mexican origin in the United States. Students will examine a variety of texts dealing with the historical (social, economic, and political) experiences of this heterogeneous population.

LTEN 30. Poetry for Physicists (4)

Physicists have spoken of the beauty of equations. The poet John Keats wrote, “Beauty is truth, truth beauty . . .” What did they mean? Students will consider such questions while reading relevant essays and poems. Requirements include one creative exercise or presentation. Students may not receive credit for both LTEN 30 and PHYS 30. Prerequisites: completion of college writing requirement.

LTEN 87. Freshman Seminar (1)

The Freshman Seminar Program is designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small seminar setting. Freshman Seminars are offered in all campus departments and undergraduate colleges, and topics vary from quarter to quarter. Enrollment is limited to fifteen to twenty students, with preference given to entering freshmen. Prerequisites: none.

Upper Division

Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites may be specified below.

LTEN 104. Literatures of Medieval England (4)

Lecture-discussion course focusing on literature written in England before 1500. Topics may include themes (e.g., gender, social critique) or focus on specific genre (drama, romance, religious literature). May be repeated up to three times for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 107. Chaucer (4)

A study of Chaucer’s poetic development, beginning with The Book of the Duchess and The Parliament of Fowls, including Troilus and Criseyde, and concluding with substantial selections from The Canterbury Tales.

LTEN 110. Topics: The Renaissance (4)

Major literary works of the Renaissance, an exciting period of social and cultural transformation in England as elsewhere in Europe. Topics may include a central theme (e.g., humanism, reformation, revolution), a genre (e.g., pastoral), or comparison with other arts and sciences. May be repeated up to three times for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 112. Shakespeare I: The Elizabethan Period (4)

A lecture/discussion course exploring the development of Shakespeare’s dramatic powers in comedy, history, and tragedy, from the early plays to the middle of his career. Dramatic forms, themes, characters, and styles will be studied in the contexts of Shakespeare’s theatre and his society.

LTEN 113. Shakespeare II: The Jacobean Period (4)

A lecture/discussion course exploring the rich and varied achievements of Shakespeare’s later plays, including the major tragedies and late romances. Dramatic forms, themes, characters, and styles will be studied in the contexts of Shakespeare’s theatre and his society.

LTEN 114. Shakespeare III: Stage, Film, and Television (4)

A lecture/discussion/laboratory course involving the close study of six to eight plays representative of Shakespeare’s artistic career with particular emphasis upon the interrelation of Elizabethan plays and the stage and the critical implications of transposing plays to film and television. (Generally offered in summer session only.)

LTEN 117. Topics: The Seventeenth Century (4)

Selected topics in English literature during a period of social change, religious controversy, emergence of the New Science, and the English Civil War. The course may be devoted to one or more major authors, a particular genre, or a political, social, or literary issue. Readings chosen from writers including Jonson, Donne, Bacon, Milton, Marvell, and Dryden, among others. May be repeated up to three times for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 120. Topics: The Eighteenth Century (4)

Selected topics in English literature and culture during the “long eighteenth century,” the period between 1660 and 1830. Topics might include satiric writing, the theatre world, radical/reformist discourse, and the emergence of the professional woman writer. Writers include Behn, Wycherley, Congreve, Pope, Swift, Johnson, Wollstonecraft. May be repeated up to three times for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 124. Topics: The Nineteenth Century (4)

Selected topics in nineteenth-century British literature and culture, drawing on the Romantic and/or Victorian periods: e.g., relationships between literature and imperialism, social and political debate, gender issues, religion, or science. The course could focus solely on topics within either the Romantic or Victorian periods or comprehend writing in both periods. May be repeated up to three times for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 125. Romantic Poetry (4)

Studies in Romantic poetry, covering the first generation (Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge and their contemporaries) and/or the second generation (Shelley, Keats, Byron and their contemporaries) of Romantic poets. May be repeated up to three times for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 127. Victorian Poetry (4)

Studies in the poetry of the Victorian age including writers such as Tennyson, the Brownings, Arnold, Rosetti, Hopkins, and their contemporaries. May be repeated up to three times for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 130. Modern British Literature (4)

Selected topics concerned with modern British literature; study of various authors, issues, and trends in literatures of the British Isles from the mid-1850s through the present day. May be repeated up to three times for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 132. Modern Irish Literature (4)

The Irish Revival and its aftermath: Yeats, Synge, O'Casey, Joyce, Beckett, and their contemporaries. May be repeated up to three times for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 138. The British Novel: 1680–1790 (4)

Studies in the early period of the development of the English novel. Writers may include Behn, Defoe, Richardson, and Burney. May be repeated up to three times for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 140. The British Novel: 1790–1830 (4)

Studies in the early nineteenth century novel, such as the novels of Austen, Wollstonecraft and/or Shelly, the Gothic novel, radical fiction of the 1790s. May be repeated up to three times for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 142. The British Novel: 1830–1890 (4)

Covers the early and midperiod Victorian novel, including such novelists as Dickens, the Brontes, Thackery, Eliot and their contemporaries. May be repeated up to three times for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 144. The British Novel: 1890 to Present (4)

Selected topics in the British novel from the late Victorian novel to present-day Black British fiction. Topics include colonial and post-colonial writing, modernism, and post-WWII fiction. May be repeated up to three times for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 148. Genres in English and American Literature (4)

An examination of one or more genres in English and/or American literature, for example, satire, science fiction, autobiography, comic drama. May be repeated up to three times for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 149. Topics: English-Language Literature (4)

A consideration of one of the themes that recur in many periods and cultural contexts of English-language literatures for instance, love, politics, identity, gender, race, class, or religion. May be repeated up to three times for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 150. Gender, Text, and Culture (4)

This course studies representations of the sexes and of their interrelationship in various forms of English-language writing produced during different phases of English history. Emphasis will be placed upon connections of gender and of literature to other modes of social belief, experience, and practice. May be repeated up to three times for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 151. Topics: Animals and the Natural World (4)

An examination of nonhuman animals and the natural world in relation to English-language literatures and other cultural expressions at different historical periods. Topics might include the relationship among species, race, class, and gender; nature writing in different genres; critical animal studies; and eco-criticism. May be repeated up tot three times for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 152. The Origins of American Literature (4)

Studies in American written and oral literatures from the early colonial to the early national period (1620–1830), with emphasis on the thrust and continuity of American culture, social and intellectual, through the beginnings of major American writing in the first quarter of the nineteenth century. May be repeated up to three times for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 153. The Revolutionary War and the Early National Period in US Literature (4)

A critical examination of new texts of various kinds—written and oral, political, philosophical, and literary—functioned in the construction of the political body of the new American republic and the self-conception of its citizens. May be repeated up to three times for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 154. The American Renaissance (4)

A study of some of the chief works, and the linguistic, philosophical, and historical attitudes informing them, produced by such authors as Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, Dickinson, and Whitman during the period 1836–1865, when the role of American writing in the national culture becomes an overriding concern. May be repeated up to three times for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 155. Interactions between American Literature and the Visual Arts (4)

An exploration of the connections between the work of individual writers, or movements, and the work of artists in various visual media. The writers studied are always American; the artists or art movements may represent non-American influences on these American writers. Topics could include portraiture and self-portraiture in visual arts and literature, or nature writing and landscape painting. May be repeated up to three times for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 156. American Literature from the Civil War to World War I (4)

A critical examination of works by such authors as Mark Twain, Henry James, Kate Chopin, and Edith Wharton, who were writing in an age when the frontier was conquered and American society began to experience massive industrialization and urbanization. May be repeated up to three times for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 158. Modern American Literature (4)

A critical examination of American literature in several genres and other facets of US culture produced between the turn of the century and World War II. May be repeated up to three times for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 159. Contemporary American Literature (4)

A critical examination of American literature in several genres and other facets of US culture produced since World War II. May be repeated up to three times for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 160. Ideas and Photographic Images in American Culture (4)

This course relates the history of photography in America to the history of ideas in American culture. It assumes that photographers think in images and through their images participate in cultural discourse. May be repeated up to three times for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 172. American Poetry II—Whitman through the Modernists (4)

Reading and interpretation of American poets from Whitman through the principal modernists—Pound, H.D., Eliot, Moore, Stevens, and others. Lectures will set the appropriate context in sociocultural and literary history.

LTEN 174. American Fiction II—Since Middle James (4)

Reading and interpretation of American fiction from Henry James through the principal modernists—Fitzgerald, Stein, Welty, Faulkner, and others. Lectures will set the appropriate context.

LTEN 175A. New American Fiction—Post-World War II to the Present (4)

Reading and interpretation of American fiction from the mid-1940s to the present. Lectures will set the appropriate context in sociocultural and literary history. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 175B. New American Poetry—Post-World War II to the Present (4)

Reading and interpretation of American poets whose work has made its major impact since the last war, for instance Charles Olson, Robert Creeley, Denise Levertov, Adrienne Rich, Allen Ginsberg, Frank O’Hara, and John Ashbery. Lectures will set the appropriate context in sociocultural and literary history. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTEN 176. Major American Writers (4)

A study in depth of the works of major American writers. May be repeated up to three times for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 177. California Literature (4)

Reading and interpretation of such novelists as London, Norris, Steinbeck, West, and Didion and such poets as Jeffers, Rexroth, Everson, Duncan, and Snyder. May be repeated up to three times for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 178. Comparative Ethnic Literature (4)

A lecture-discussion course that juxtaposes the experience of two or more US ethnic groups and examines their relationship with the dominant culture. Students will analyze a variety of texts representing the history of ethnicity in this country. Topics will vary.

LTEN 180. Chicano Literature in English (4)

Introduction to the literature in English by the Chicano population, the men and women of Mexican descent who live and write in the United States. Primary focus on the contemporary period.

LTEN 181. Asian American Literature (4)

Selected topics in the literature by men and women of Asian descent who live and write in the United States. Repeatable for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 182. African American Humor (4)

African American humor has historically been divided, consisting of that created by and for a black audience, and that performed for a white audience. We will investigate the origins of this division, and the ways in which African American humor has shaped American culture, from ca. eighteenth century to today.

LTEN 183. African American Prose (4)

Analysis and discussion of the novel, the personal narrative, and other prose genres, with particular emphasis on the developing characteristics of African American narrative and the cultural and social circumstances that influence their development.

LTEN 184. African American Poetry (4)

Close reading and analysis of selected works of African American poetry as they reflect styles and themes that recur in the literature.

LTEN 185. Themes in African American Literature (4)

An intensive examination of a characteristic theme, special issue, or period in African American literature. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 186. Literature of the Harlem Renaissance (4)

The Harlem Renaissance (1917–39) focuses on the emergence of the “New Negro” and the impact of this concept on black literature, art, and music. Writers studied include Claude McKay, Zora N. Hurston, and Langston Hughes. Special emphasis on new themes and forms.

LTEN 187. Black Music/Black Texts: Communication and Cultural Expression (4)

Explores roles of music as a traditional form of communication among Africans, Afro-Americans, and West-Indians. Special attention given to poetry of black music, including blues and other forms of vocal music expressive of contestatory political attitudes.

LTEN 188. Contemporary Caribbean Literature (4)

This course will focus on contemporary literature of the English-speaking Caribbean. The parallels and contrasts of this Third World literature with those of the Spanish- and French-speaking Caribbean will also be explored.

LTEN 189. Twentieth-Century Postcolonial Literatures (4)

The impact of British colonialism, national independence movements, postcolonial cultural trends, and women’s movements on the global production of literary texts in English. Course is organized by topic or geographical/historical location. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 190. Seminars (4)

These seminars are devoted to a variety of special topics, including the works of single authors, genre studies, problems in literary history, relations between literature and the history of ideas, literary criticism, literature and society, and the like. The student may enroll in more than one section in a single quarter.

LTEN 192. Senior Seminar in Literatures in English (1)

The Senior Seminar Program is designed to allow senior undergraduates to meet with faculty members in a small group setting to explore an intellectual topic in literature (at the upper-division level). Senior Seminars may be offered in all campus departments. Topics will vary from quarter to quarter. Senior Seminars may be taken for credit up to four times, with a change in topic, and permission of the department. Enrollment is limited to twenty students, with preference given to seniors. Prerequisites: department stamp and/or consent of instructor.

LTEN 196. Honors Thesis (4)

Senior thesis research and writing for students who have been accepted for the Literature Honors Program and who have completed LTWL 191. Oral exam. Prerequisites: department approval.

LTEN 199. Special Studies (2 or 4)

Tutorial; individual guided reading in an area not normally covered in courses. May be repeated for credit three times.(P/NP grades only.) Prerequisites: department approval.

Graduate

Prerequisites: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

LTEN 222. Elizabethan Studies (4)

Selected topics in the study of literary, dramatic, and other Elizabethan cultural texts. Emphasis will be upon articulations among a range of discourses, practices, and institutions. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 231. Restoration and Eighteenth-Century English Literature (4)

Consideration of one or more figures, texts, or trends in Restoration and eighteenth-century English literature, including Dryden, Pope, Swift, the early novel, satire. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTEN 243. Early American Literature and Culture (4)

Consideration of one or more major figures, texts, or trends in Colonial and/or Revolutionary period American Literature, in particular, the relationship between literature and culture.

LTEN 245. Nineteenth-Century American Studies (4)

Consideration of some of the principal writers and movements in nineteenth-century American literature. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTEN 246. Victorian Literature (4)

Consideration of one or more major figures, texts, or trends in the Victorian period. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTEN 252. Studies in Modern American Literature and Culture (4)

Consideration of one or more major figures, texts, or trends in American literature, in particular the relationship between literature and culture. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTEN 254. Topics in US Minority Literatures and Cultures (4)

Consideration of one or more topics in “minority” traditions of cultural production in the United States, with an emphasis on the relationship among history, politics, and culture. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTEN 255. Studies in Anglo-American Modernism (4)

A seminar on general topics relating to the study of modernism, utilizing cross-cultural, transnational approaches. Although individual literary texts may provide the focus, this seminar will investigate theoretical and methodological issues relating to modernist cultural studies in general.

LTEN 256. Postcolonial Discourses (4)

A survey of selected responses to imperialism and colonialism as presented in cultural texts produced by colonized or once-colonized peoples. Related issues to be examined: gender dynamics, class, representing others, mimicry, language, cultural theory, and the politics of literary genres. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 258. Studies in Anglophone African and/or African Diaspora Literature and Culture (4)

Consideration of one or more major figures, texts, performance or trends in literature and culture of Africa and/or the African Diaspora. Various theories and methodologies may be applied to the representations being studied. Repeatable for credit as topics vary.

LTEN 259. Transnational Literary Studies (4)

New developments in the study of literature in diverse frameworks, including but not limited to: globalization, queer theory, diaspora studies, environmentalism, world literary systems, international literary awards, transnational feminism, literary markets, human rights discourse, and translation studies.

LTEN 271. Genres in English (4)

Consideration of one or more genres present in English and/or American literature; for instance, the ballad, landscape poetry, comedy, satire, the familiar essay. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 272. Cultural Traditions in English (4)

The study of writing produced over an extended period of time by members of an identifiable cultural formation as defined (e.g., by political/social ideology, class, religion, ethnicity, or sexual preference). May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

LTEN 281. Practicum in Literary Research and Criticism (4)

This course will focus on strategies for framing, organizing, and drafting projects in literary research. Students will study and apply various forms of literary methodology and will learn about recent developments in bibliography, textual editing, and research. May be repeated twice for credit as topics vary.

LTEN 295. MA Thesis (1–8)

Research for the master’s thesis. Opened for repeated registration. Prerequisites: must be enrolled in MA program.

LTEN 297. Directed Studies: Reading Course (1–12)

This course may be designed according to an individual student’s needs when seminar offerings do not cover subjects, genres, or authors of interest. No paper required. The 297 courses do not count toward the seminar requirement. Repeatable for credit.

LTEN 298. Special Projects: Writing Course (1–12)

Similar to a 297, but a paper is required. Papers are usually on subject not covered by seminar offerings. Up to two 298s may be applied toward the twelve-seminar requirement of the doctoral program. Repeatable for credit.

LTEN 299. Dissertation (1–12)

Research for the dissertation. Offered for repeated registration. Open only to PhD students who have advanced to candidacy.

LITERATURES IN FRENCH

Lower Division

Language and Literature Courses

Ordinarily, students entering the French literature program elect one of the following sequences: LTFR 2A, 2B, and 2C; or 2A, 2B, and 50.

LTFR 2A. Intermediate French I (5)

First course in a three-quarter sequence designed to prepare students for upper-division French courses. The course is taught entirely in French and emphasizes the development of reading ability, listening comprehension, and conversational and writing skills. Basic techniques of literary analysis. Prerequisites: LIFR 1C/CX or its equivalent, score of 3 on French language AP exam or consent of instructor.

LTFR 2B. Intermediate French II (5)

Second course in a three-quarter sequence designed to prepare students for upper-division French courses. The course is taught entirely in French and emphasizes the development of reading ability, listening comprehension, and conversational and writing skills. Basic techniques of literary analysis. Prerequisites: LTFR 2A or its equivalent, score of 4 on French language or score of 3 on French literature AP exams or consent of instructor.

LTFR 2C. Intermediate French III: Composition and Cultural Contexts (4)

Designed to improve writing and conversational skills. Develop written expression in terms of organization or ideas, structure, vocabulary. Grammar review. Discussions of contemporary novel and film. May be taken in lieu of LTFR 50 as a prerequisite for upper-division courses. Prerequisites: LTFR 2B or its equivalent, score of 5 on French language or score of 4 on French literature AP exams or consent of instructor.

LTFR 21. Conversation Workshop I (1)

Designed to allow students to practice and develop their oral skills by expanding the vocabulary necessary to discuss abstract ideas and by building up the confidence necessary to participate in literature classes. Prerequisites: LIFR 1C/1CX or 1D/1DX or LTFR 2A or LTFR 2B or LTFR 2C or LTFR 50 or consent of instructor.

LTFR 31. Conversation Workshop II (1)

A one-credit, one class-a-week course to develop and maintain oral skills at an advanced level by discussing current cultural issues of the francophone world. Prerequisites: LTFR 2B or consent of instructor.

LTFR 50. Intermediate French III: Textual Analysis (4)

Third course in a three-quarter sequence designed to prepare students for upper-division French courses. The course is taught entirely in French and emphasizes the development of reading ability, listening comprehension, and conversational and writing skills. It also introduces the student to basic techniques of literary analysis. Prerequisites: LTFR 2B or its equivalent, score of 5 on French language AP exam, or consent of instructor.

Upper Division

Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor. All upper-division courses are taught in French. Additional prerequisites may be specified below.

Students are strongly encouraged to take LTFR 115 and 116 before enrolling in other upper-division French literature courses.

LTFR 115. Themes in Intellectual and Literary History (4)

Course in a two-quarter sequence designed as an introduction to French literature and literary history. Each quarter will center on a specific theme or problem. It is recommended that majors whose primary literature is French take this sequence as early as possible. Prerequisites: LTFR 50 or LTFR 2C.

LTFR 116. Themes in Intellectual and Literary History (4)

Course in a two-quarter sequence designed as an introduction to French literature and literary history. Each quarter will center on a specific theme or problem. It is recommended that majors whose primary literature is French take this sequence as early as possible. Prerequisites: LTFR 50 or LTFR 2C.

LTFR 121. The Middle Ages and the Renaissance (4)

Major literary works of the Middle Ages and Renaissance as seen against the historical and intellectual background of the period. Medieval texts in modern French translation. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTFR 115 or 116.

LTFR 123. Eighteenth Century (4)

Major literary works and problems of the eighteenth century. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTFR 115 or 116.

LTFR 124. Nineteenth Century (4)

Major literary works of the nineteenth century. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTFR 115 or 116.

LTFR 125. Twentieth Century (4)

Major literary works and problems of the twentieth century. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTFR 115 or 116.

LTFR 141. Topics in Literatures in French (4)

Examines one or more periods, themes, authors, and approaches in French literature. Topics will vary with instructor. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: LTFR 115 or 116.

LTFR 142. Topics in Literary Genres in French (4)

An examination of one or more major or minor genres of French literature: for example, drama, novel, poetry, satire, prose poem, essay. Prerequisites: LTFR 115 or 116.

LTFR 143. Topics in Major Authors in French (4)

A study in depth of the works of a major French writer. Recommended for students whose primary literature is French. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTFR 115 or 116.

LTFR 145. Contemporary Thought in French (4)

Presentation of major currents and debates in contemporary philosophy, linguistics, psychoanalysis, anthropology, and social and feminist theory that have led to major changes in French culture and literary studies. Prerequisites: LTFR 115 or 116.

LTFR 164. Topics in Modern French Culture (4)

A course on changing topics such as France during the 1960s, contemporary social and cultural structures (the school system, economy, political parties), myths of America in France, etc. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTFR 115 or 116.

LTFR 192. Senior Seminar in Literatures in French (1)

The Senior Seminar Program is designed to allow senior undergraduates to meet with faculty members in a small group setting to explore an intellectual topic in literature (at the upper-division level). Senior Seminars may be offered in all campus departments. Topics will vary from quarter to quarter. Senior Seminars may be taken for credit up to four times, with a change in topic, and permission of the department. Enrollment is limited to twenty students, with preference given to seniors. Prerequisites: department stamp and/or consent of instructor.

LTFR 199. Special Studies (2 or 4)

Tutorial; individual guided reading in areas of French literature not normally covered in courses. (P/NP grades only.) Prerequisites: departmental approval.

Graduate

Prerequisites: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

LTFR 240. Topics in French Literature (4)

An examination of one or more major topics in French literature. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

LTFR 295. MA Thesis (1–8)

Research for the master’s thesis. Opened for repeated registration up to eight units. Prerequisites: must be enrolled in MA program.

LTFR 297. Directed Studies: Reading Course (1–12)

This course may be designed according to an individual student’s needs when seminar offerings do not cover subjects, genres, or authors of interest. No paper required. The 297 courses do not count toward the seminar requirement. Repeatable for credit.

LTFR 298. Special Projects: Writing Course (1–12)

Similar to a 297, but a paper is required. Papers are usually on subjects not covered by seminar offerings. Up to two 298s may be applied toward the twelve-seminar requirement of the doctoral program. Repeatable for credit.

LTFR 299. Dissertation (1–12)

Research for the dissertation. Offered for repeated registration. Open only to PhD students who have advanced to candidacy.

LITERATURES IN GERMAN

Lower Division

Language and Literature Courses

LTGM 2A. Intermediate German I (5)

LTGM 2A follows the basic language sequence of the Department of Linguistics and emphasizes the development of reading ability, listening comprehension, and conversational and writing skills. The course includes grammar review and class discussion of reading and audio-visual materials. Specifically, the course prepares students for LIGM 2B and 2C. Prerequisites: LTGM 1C/1CX or its equivalent or score of 3 on AP German language exam or consent of instructor.

LTGM 2B. Intermediate German II (5)

LTGM 2B is a continuation of LTGM 2A for those students who intend to practice their skills in reading, listening comprehension, and writing on a more advanced level. The literary texts are supplemented by readings from other disciplines as well as audio-visual materials. Prerequisites: LTGM 2A or score of 4 on AP German language exam or consent of instructor.

LTGM 2C. Intermediate German III (4)

A course designed for students who wish to improve their ability to speak and write German. Students will read and discuss a variety of texts and films, and complete the grammar review begun in 2A. 2C emphasizes speaking, writing, and critical thinking, and prepares students for upper-division course work in German. Prerequisites: LTGM 2B or equivalent or score of 5 on AP German language exam or consent of instructor.

Upper Division

Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites may be specified below.

LTGM 100. German Studies I: Aesthetic Cultures (4)

This course offers an overview of German aesthetic culture in its various forms (literature, film, art, music, and architecture) and methods of analysis. Materials will explore the diversity of aesthetic production from the eighteenth century to the present.

LTGM 101. German Studies II: National Identities (4)

This course offers an overview of issues in contemporary and historical German cultures. How has national identity been constructed in the past? What does it mean to be a German in the new Europe? Materials include fiction, historical documents, films, and the Internet.

LTGM 130. German Literary Prose (4)

The development of major forms and modes of German literary prose. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTGM 131. German Dramatic Literature (4)

The development of the drama in German. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTGM 132. German Poetry (4)

The development of major forms and modes of German verse. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTGM 190. Seminars in German Culture (4)

These seminars are devoted to a variety of special topics, including the works of single authors, genre studies, problems in literary history, relations between literature and the history of ideas, literary criticism, literature and society, and the like. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTGM 192. Senior Seminar in Literatures in German (1)

The Senior Seminar Program is designed to allow senior undergraduates to meet with faculty members in a small group setting to explore an intellectual topic in literature (at the upper-division level). Senior Seminars may be offered in all campus departments. Topics will vary from quarter to quarter. Senior Seminars may be taken for credit up to four times, with a change in topic, and permission of the department. Enrollment is limited to twenty students, with preference given to seniors. Prerequisites: department stamp and/or consent of instructor.

LTGM 199. Special Studies (2 or 4)

Tutorial; individual guided reading in areas of German literature not normally covered in courses. May be repeated for credit three times. (P/NP grades only.) Prerequisites: department approval.

Graduate

Prerequisites: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

LTGM 297. Directed Studies: Reading Course (1–12)

This course may be designed according to an individual student’s needs when seminar offerings do not cover subjects, genres, or authors of interest. No paper required. The 297 courses do not count toward the seminar requirement. Repeatable for credit.

LTGM 298. Special Projects: Writing Course (1–12)

Similar to a 297, but a paper is required. Papers are usually on subjects not covered by seminar offerings. Up to two 298s may be applied toward the twelve-seminar requirement of the doctoral program. Repeatable for credit.

GREEK LITERATURE

(See also listings under “Classical Studies.”)

Lower Division

LTGK 1. Beginning Greek (4)

Study of ancient Greek, including grammar and reading.

LTGK 2. Intermediate Greek (I) (4)

Continuation of study of ancient Greek, including grammar and reading. Prerequisites: LTGK 1 or equivalent.

LTGK 3. Intermediate Greek (II) (4)

Continuation of study of ancient Greek, including grammar and reading of texts. Prerequisites: LTGK 1 and 2 or equivalent.

Upper Division

Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites may be specified below.

LTGK 101. Greek Composition (4)

Greek prose composition. Corequisites: student must be concurrently enrolled in upper-division Literature/Greek course numbered 110 or above.

LTGK 110. Archaic Period (4)

Readings, in Greek, of texts from the archaic period. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTGK 1, 2, 3 or equivalent.

LTGK 112. Homer (4)

Readings from the works of Homer. Prerequisites: LTGK 1, 2, 3 or equivalent.

LTGK 118. Hellenistic Period (4)

Reading, in Greek, of texts from Hellenistic period. Prerequisites: LTGK 1, 2, 3 or equivalent.

LTGK 120. Topics in New Testament Greek (4)

Readings, in Greek, in the Greek New Testament. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTGK 1, 2, 3 or equivalent.

LTGK 130. Tragedy (4)

Readings, in Greek, of one or more of the works of the classical tragedians Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTGK 1, 2, 3 or equivalent.

LTGK 131. Comedy (4)

Readings, in Greek, of one or more of the works of Aristophanes. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTGK 1, 2, 3 or equivalent.

LTGK 132. History (4)

Readings, in Greek, in the works of the ancient historians, including Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTGK 1, 2, 3 or equivalent.

LTGK 133. Prose (4)

Readings, in Greek, in the works of ancient prose writers. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTGK 1, 2, 3 or equivalent.

LTGK 135. Lyric Poetry (4)

Readings, in Greek, of the works of the ancient lyric poets. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTGK 1, 2, 3 or equivalent.

LTGK 192. Senior Seminar in Literatures in Greek (1)

The Senior Seminar Program is designed to allow senior undergraduates to meet with faculty members in a small group setting to explore an intellectual topic in literature (at the upper-division level). Senior Seminars may be offered in all campus departments. Topics will vary from quarter to quarter. Senior Seminars may be taken for credit up to four times, with a change in topic, and permission of the department. Enrollment is limited to twenty students, with preference given to seniors. Prerequisites: department stamp and/or consent of instructor.

LTGK 198. Directed Group Study (4)

Directed group study in areas of Greek literature not normally covered in courses. May be repeated for credit three times. (P/NP grades only.) Prerequisites: department approval.

Graduate

Prerequisites: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

HEBREW LITERATURE

Please see “Near Eastern Literatures” under “Literatures of the World.”

LITERATURES IN ITALIAN

Lower Division

(See “Department of Linguistics” for other course offerings in first-year Italian.)

LTIT 2A. Intermediate Italian I (5)

A second-year course in Italian language and literature. Conversation, composition, grammar review, and an introduction to literary and nonliterary texts. Prerequisites: LTIT 1C or LIIT 1C/1CX or its equivalent or a score of 3 on AP Italian Language and Culture Exam or placement result of 3 or 4 on the Language Placement Exam–Italian or consent of instructor.

LTIT 2B. Intermediate Italian II (5)

Continuation of second-year Italian language and literature. Reading, writing, conversation, grammar review, and an introduction to literary genres and contemporary Italian culture and society. Prerequisites: LTIT 2A or its equivalent, or consent of instructor, or a score of 4 on the AP Italian Language and Culture exam.

LTIT 50. Advanced Italian (4)

This course constitutes the sixth and final quarter of the Italian language sequence. It offers an intensive study of Italian grammar, drills in conversation and composition, and readings in modern Italian literature. Prerequisites: LTIT 2A and 2B, or consent of instructor.

Upper Division

Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites may be specified below.

LTIT 100. Introduction to Literatures in Italian (4)

Reading and discussion of selections from representative authors. Review of grammar as needed. May be repeated for credit three times when topics vary. Prerequisites: LTIT 50 or its equivalent, or consent of instructor, or a score of 5 on the AP Italian Language and Culture exam.

LTIT 110. Italian Literature (4)

Topics in Italian literature: regional, historic, thematic. Texts will be read in Italian. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisites: LTIT 100.

LTIT 113. Love, War, and Conquest in the Italian Renaissance (4)

A critical reading of Italian Renaissance texts with special attention to those themes, forms, and ideological conflicts still operative in today’s culture. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

LTIT 115. Medieval Studies (4)

Studies in medieval culture and thought with focus on one of the “three crowns” of Italian literature: Dante, Boccaccio, or Petrarca. May be repeated for credit when course content varies.

LTIT 122. Studies in Modern Italian Culture (4)

Politics, literature, and cultural issues of twentieth-century Italy. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisites: LTIT 50.

LTIT 143. Major Italian Authors (4)

A study in depth of the works of a major Italian author. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisites: LTIT 100 or permission of instructor.

LTIT 161. Advanced Stylistics and Conversation (4)

Analysis of Italian essays, journalism, literature. Intensive practice in writing and Italian conversation. Prerequisites: LTIT 100 or consent of instructor.

LTIT 192. Senior Seminar in Literatures in Italian (1)

The Senior Seminar Program is designed to allow senior undergraduates to meet with faculty members in a small group setting to explore an intellectual topic in literature (at the upper-division level). Senior Seminars may be offered in all campus departments. Topics will vary from quarter to quarter. Senior Seminars may be taken for credit up to four times, with a change in topic, and permission of the department. Enrollment is limited to twenty students, with preference given to seniors. Prerequisites: department stamp and/or consent of instructor.

LTIT 196. Honors Thesis (4)

Senior thesis research and writing for students who have been accepted for the literature honors program and who have completed LTWL 191. Oral examination. Prerequisites: department approval.

LTIT 198. Directed Group Study (4)

Directed group study in areas of Italian literature not normally covered in courses. May be repeated for credit three times. (P/NP grades only.) Prerequisites: department approval.

LTIT 199. Special Studies (2 or 4)

Tutorial; individual guided reading in areas of Italian literature not normally covered in courses. May be repeated for credit three times. (P/NP grades only.) Prerequisites: department approval.

KOREAN LITERATURE

Lower Division

LTKO 1A. Beginning Korean: First Year I (5)

Students develop beginning-level skills in the Korean language, beginning with an introduction to the writing and sound system. The remainder of the course will focus on basic sentence structures and expressions. Prerequisites: placement test required.

LTKO 1B. Beginning Korean: First Year II (5)

Students develop beginning-level skills in the Korean language, beginning with an introduction to the writing and sound system. The remainder of the course will focus on basic sentence structures and expressions. Prerequisites: LTKO 1A.

LTKO 1C. Beginning Korean: First Year III (5)

Students develop beginning-level skills in the Korean language, beginning with an introduction to the writing and sound system. The remainder of the course will focus on basic sentence structures and expressions. Prerequisites: LTKO 1B.

LTKO 2A-B-C. Intermediate Korean: Second Year I-II-III (5-5-5)

This course will help students develop intermediate-level skills in the Korean language. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to have good command of Korean in various daily conversational situations. Prerequisites: LTKO 1C or placement test for 2A; 2A is prerequisite for 2B; 2B for 2C.

LTKO 2D. Intermediate-Advanced Korean I (5)

This course is designed to develop intermediate-advanced level skills for students in the areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Korean, as well as expand their cultural understanding, with coverage of authentic Korean reading and listening materials. Prerequisites: LTKO 2C or equivalent level of Korean language proficiency.

LTKO 3. Advanced Korean: Third Year (5)

This course will help students develop advanced-level skills in the Korean language. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to have good command of Korean in various formal settings and to understand daily news broadcasts/newspapers. Prerequisites: LTKO 2C or placement test and consent of instructor.

LTKO 11.  Conversation Workshop I (1)

This conversation course is designed to assist nonheritage Korean students, with minimum grounding in Korean, to practice and develop conversational fluency and confidence in everyday interactions in Korean. The focus of this course is on vocabulary development and advancement of oral proficiency in Korean. Recommended preparation: This course is recommended for nonheritage Korean students who take the First-Year Korean LTKO 1B or LTKO 1C as an adjunct. May be taken for credit three times as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTKO 1A or consent of instructor.

LTKO 21.  Conversation Workshop II (1)

This course is designed to assist nonheritage Korean students to practice and develop conversational fluency and confidence in everyday interactions. The focus is on vocabulary development and advancement of oral proficiency. Recommended for nonheritage Korean students who take LTKO 1B or LTKO 1C as an adjunct. May be taken for credit three times as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTKO 1A, placement test, and consent of instructor.

LTKO 50. Intermediate Readings and Composition (4)

Designed to enhance reading and writing skills. We will read and discuss a variety of materials, including newspaper and magazine articles, short essays, and prose fiction. Writing exercises will stress improving students’ ability to express themselves as well as their critical responses to reading. Prerequisites: LTKO 2C and/or recommendation of instructor.

Upper Division

Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites may be specified below.

LTKO 100. Readings in Korean Literature and Culture (4)

Majors issues in modern Korean history from colonial period to present, such as Japanese colonization, division, US/Soviet occupation, the Korean War, and authoritarian rule, industrialization, labor/agrarian movement and cultural/social issues, emerging within the globalized economy in South Korea. Prerequisites: reading knowledge of Korean (two years college-level Korean or equivalent).

LTKO 192. Senior Seminar in Literatures in Korean (1)

The Senior Seminar Program is designed to allow senior undergraduates to meet with faculty members in a small group setting to explore an intellectual topic in literature (at the upper-division level). Senior Seminars may be offered in all campus departments. Topics will vary from quarter to quarter. Senior Seminars may be taken for credit up to four times, with a change in topic, and permission of the department. Enrollment is limited to twenty students, with preference given to seniors. Prerequisites: department stamp and/or consent of instructor.

LATIN LITERATURE

(See also listings under “Classical Studies.”)

Lower Division

LTLA 1. Beginning Latin (4)

Study of Latin, including grammar and reading.

LTLA 2. Intermediate Latin (I) (4)

Study of Latin, including grammar and reading. Prerequisites: LTLA 1 or equivalent.

LTLA 3. Intermediate Latin (II) (4)

Study of Latin, including grammar and reading. Prerequisites: LTLA 2 or equivalent.

LTLA 4. Intensive Elementary Latin (12)

Equivalent of LTLA 1, 2, and 3. Given in summer session only.

Upper Division

Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites may be specified below.

LTLA 100. Introduction to Latin Literature (4)

Reading and discussion of selections from representative authors of one or more periods. Review of grammar as needed. Prerequisites: LTLA 3 or equivalent.

LTLA 111. Pre-Augustan (4)

Readings, in Latin, in the works of Roman writers of the pre-Augustan period. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTLA 1, 2, 3 or equivalent.

LTLA 114. Vergil (4)

Readings from the works of Vergil. Prerequisites: LTLA 1, 2, 3 or equivalent.

LTLA 131. Prose (4)

Readings, in Latin, of the work of Roman prose writers. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTLA 1, 2, 3 or equivalent.

LTLA 133. Epic (4)

Readings in Latin in the works of the Roman epic poets. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTLA 1, 2, 3 or equivalent.

LTLA 134. History (4)

Readings, in Latin, in the works of Roman historians. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTLA 1, 2, 3 or equivalent.

LTLA 135. Drama (4)

Readings, in Latin, in the works of Roman dramatists. Repeatable for credit when topics vary. Prerequisites: LTLA 3 or equivalent; LTLA 100 recommended.

LTLA 192. Senior Seminar in Literatures in Latin (1)

The Senior Seminar Program is designed to allow senior undergraduates to meet with faculty members in a small group setting to explore an intellectual topic in literature (at the upper-division level). Senior Seminars may be offered in all campus departments. Topics will vary from quarter to quarter. Senior Seminars may be taken for credit up to four times, with a change in topic, and permission of the department. Enrollment is limited to twenty students, with preference given to seniors. Prerequisites: department stamp and/or consent of instructor.

LTLA 198. Directed Group Study (4)

Directed group study in areas of Latin literature not normally covered in courses. May be repeated three times. (P/NP grades only.) Prerequisites: department approval.

LTLA 199. Special Studies (2 or 4)

Tutorial; individual guided reading in areas of Latin literature not normally covered in courses. May be repeated for credit three times. (P/NP grades only.) Prerequisites: department approval.

Graduate

Prerequisites: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

PORTUGUESE LITERATURE

Lower Division

LTPR 2A. Intermediate Portuguese I: Foundations (5)

Intermediate course in Portuguese language, emphasizing the development of verbal communication, listening comprehension, and reading and writing skills. Conducted in Portuguese, it includes reviews of grammar and vocabulary, weekly compositions, and class discussions. Prerequisites: LIPO 1C/CX or 1D/DX or the equivalent or consent of instructor.

LTPR 2B. Intermediate Portuguese II: Readings and Composition (5)

Continuation of LTPR 2A. Conducted in Portuguese, this course reviews major grammatical points with an emphasis on critical reading and the interpretation of Portuguese-language texts through class discussions, vocabulary development, and written compositions. Prerequisites: LTPR 2A or equivalent or consent of instructor.

LTPR 2C. Intermediate Portuguese III: Cultural Topics and Composition (4)

Continuation of LTPR 2B. This course emphasizes writing and verbal communication skills. It includes discussions of cultural topics, grammatical reviews, and composition writing, further developing students’ abilities to comprehend and interpret articles, essays, and longer pieces of fictional/nonfictional texts. Prerequisites: LTPR 2B or equivalent or consent of instructor.

LTPR 50. Topics in Brazilian Literature in Portuguese for Spanish Speakers (4)

Introductory Portuguese language and literature course designed especially for speakers of Spanish. Will build on students’ knowledge of Spanish, enabling them to acquire competence in language structures of Portuguese and introducing them to Brazilian texts in Portuguese.

RUSSIAN LITERATURE

Lower Division

LTRU 1A-B-C. First-Year Russian (5-5-5)

First-year Russian, with attention to reading, writing, and speaking.

LTRU 2A-B-C. Second-Year Russian (5-5-5)

Second-year Russian grammar, with attention to reading, writing, and speaking. Prerequisites: LTRU 1A-B-C or equivalent.

Upper Division

Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites may be specified below.

Note: Many Russian literature courses are cross-listed as courses in European and Eurasian Literatures (LTEU). Lectures and discussions are conducted in English, and students may choose whether to do the reading and writing assignments in translation, in which case they should enroll for the course under its LTEU rubric, or in Russian, in which case they should enroll under the LTRU rubric. Other courses are offered in English translation with one-unit Foreign Language Discussion Sections (XL course number suffix) for students who wish to read and discuss some or all of assignments in Russian.

LTRU 104A-B-C. Advanced Practicum in Russian (4-4-4)

Development of advanced skills in reading, writing, and conversation. Course based on written and oral texts of various genres and styles. Individualized program to meet specific student needs. Prerequisite for 104A: LTRU 2C or equivalent.

LTRU 110A-B-C. Survey of Russian and Soviet Literature in Translation, 1800–Present (4-4-4)

A study of literary works from Pushkin to the present. LTRU 110A is not a prerequisite for LTRU 110B, and LTRU 110B is not a prerequisite for LTRU 110C.

110A. 1800–1860

110B. 1860–1917

110C. 1917–present

LTRU 123. Single Author in Russian Literature in Translation (4)

Study of the works of a single Russian author. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTRU 150. Russian Culture (4)

An introduction to Russia’s past and present through the cross-disciplinary study of literature, the visual and performing arts, social and political thought, civic rituals, popular entertainments, values and practices from 1825 to the present. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

LTRU 192. Senior Seminar in Literatures in Russian (1)

The Senior Seminar Program is designed to allow senior undergraduates to meet with faculty members in a small group setting to explore an intellectual topic in literature (at the upper-division level). Senior Seminars may be offered in all campus departments. Topics will vary from quarter to quarter. Senior Seminars may be taken for credit up to four times, with a change in topic, and permission of the department. Enrollment is limited to twenty students, with preference given to seniors. Prerequisites: department stamp and/or consent of instructor.

LTRU 198. Directed Group Study (4)

Directed group study in areas of Russian literature not normally covered in courses. May be repeated for credit three times. (P/NP grades only.) Prerequisites: upper-division standing and permission of department.

LTRU 199. Special Studies (2 or 4)

Tutorial; individual guided reading in areas of Russian literature not normally covered in courses. May be repeated for credit three times. (P/NP grades only.) Prerequisites: upper-division standing and permission of department.

LITERATURES IN SPANISH

Lower Division

Language and Literature Courses

Students entering the Spanish language/literature program must have completed one year of college-level Spanish (Linguistics/Spanish 1C/1CX) or its equivalent at another institution or have the consent of the instructor. Ordinarily, students take LTSP 2A, 2B, 2C, and one or more courses from the 50 sequence. Native speakers are encouraged to take LTSP 2D, 2E.

LTSP 2A. Intermediate Spanish I: Foundations (5)

Course is taught in Spanish, emphasizing the development of reading ability, listening comprehension, and writing skills. It includes grammar review, weekly compositions, and class discussions. Successful completion of LTSP 2A satisfies the requirement for language proficiency in Revelle College. Prerequisites: completion of LISP 1C/1CX or LISP 1D/DX, or the equivalent or score of 3 on AP Spanish Language Exam, or placement result of 3 or 4 the Language Placement Exam—Spanish, or consent of instructor.

LTSP 2B. Intermediate Spanish II: Readings and Composition (5)

Review of major points of grammar with emphasis on critical reading and interpretation of Spanish texts through class discussions, vocabulary development, and written compositions. It is a continuation of LTSP 2A. Prerequisites: LTSP 2A or score of 4 on AP Spanish language or 3 on AP Spanish literature exams or consent of instructor.

LTSP 2C. Intermediate Spanish III: Cultural Topics and Composition (4)

Continuation of LTSP 2B, with special emphasis in writing and translation. It includes discussion of cultural topics as well as grammar review and composition, further developing the ability to read articles, essays, and longer pieces of fiction/nonfictional texts. Prerequisites: LTSP 2B or equivalent or score of 5 on AP Spanish language or 4 on AP Spanish literature exams or consent of instructor.

LTSP 2D. Intermediate/Advanced Spanish: Spanish for Bilingual Speakers (4)

Spanish for native speakers. Designed for bilingual students seeking to become biliterate. Reading and writing skills stressed with special emphasis on improvement of written expression and problems of grammar and orthography. Prepares native speakers with little or no formal training in Spanish for more advanced courses. Prerequisites: native speaking ability and/or recommendation of instructor.

LTSP 2E. Advanced Readings and Composition for Bilingual Speakers (4)

Second course in a sequence designed for bilingual students seeking to become biliterate. Special emphasis given to improvement of written expression, grammar, and orthography. Prepares bilingual students with little or no formal training in Spanish for more advanced course work. Prerequisites: LTSP 2D and/or recommendation of instructor.

LTSP 21. Conversation Workshop I (1)

Allows students with a basic grounding in Spanish to discuss a variety of topics related to literary and cultural issues. Vocabulary development, use of idiomatic expression, and advancement of oral proficiency in Spanish. May be taken as an adjunct to lower-division LTSP courses. Recommended for students planning to study abroad. Prerequisites: LISP IC/ICX or LISP ID/IDX or LTSP 2A or 2B or 2C or 2D or 2E or 50A or 50B or 50C.

LTSP 31. Conversation Workshop II (1)

Enhances intermediate/advanced students’ command of spoken Spanish through debates on literary and cultural issues and the formulation and expression of thoughts in Spanish. May be taken as an adjunct to lower- and upper-division LTSP courses. Recommended for students planning to study abroad. Prerequisites: LISP IC/ICX or LISP ID/IDX or LTSP 2A or 2B or 2C or 2D or 2E or 50A or 50B or 50C.

LTSP 41. Conversation and Orthography Workshop (1)

The workshop format of this course allows students to attain a stronger command of skills in matters of Spanish orthography, spelling, punctuation, and accent rules. May be taken as an adjunct to lower- or upper-division LTSP courses. Recommended for students planning to study abroad. Prerequisites: LISP IC/ICX or LISP ID/IDX or LTSP 2A or 2B or 2C or 2D or 2E or 50A or 50B or 50C.

LTSP 50A. Readings in Peninsular Literature (4)

An introduction to Peninsular literature, this course offers a selection of authors and genres, introducing students to literary analysis through reading extensive texts in Spanish. Two or more quarters of LTSP 50 are suggested before proceeding to upper-division courses. May be repeated for credit three times. Prerequisites: LTSP 2C and 2E.

LTSP 50B. Readings in Latin American Literature (4)

An introduction to Latin American literature, this course offers a selection of authors and genres, introducing students to literary analysis through reading extensive texts in Spanish. Two or more quarters of LTSP 50 are suggested before proceeding to upper-division courses. May be repeated for credit three times. Prerequisites: LTSP 2C and 2E.

LTSP 50C. Readings in Latin American Topics (4)

An introduction to major topics in Latin American literature, this course focuses on the literature of a particular region, period, or movement. Introduces students to literary analysis through reading extensive texts in Spanish. May be repeated for credit three times. Prerequisites: LTSP 2C and 2E or consent of instructor.

LTSP 87. Freshman Seminar (1)

The Freshman Seminar Program is designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small seminar setting. Freshman Seminars are offered in all campus departments and undergraduate colleges, and topics vary from quarter to quarter. Enrollment is limited to fifteen to twenty students, with preference given to entering freshmen.

Upper Division

Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites may be specified below.

Note: As of fall 1992, students must have taken at least one (but preferably two) course(s) in the LTSP 50A-B-C sequence with a grade of C– or better before enrolling in upper-division courses. Without fulfillment of this prerequisite, students must obtain the consent of the instructor of the requested course.

LTSP 100. Major Works of the Middle Ages (4)

Major Spanish literary works of the Middle Ages and Renaissance as seen against the historical and intellectual background of this period. Prerequisites: LTSP 50A, 50B, or 50C, or consent of instructor.

LTSP 116. Representations of Spanish Colonialism (4)

Analysis of selected materials that represent the cultural and political relationship between Spain and its colonies. Close reading of literary texts and historical documents. Specific periods covered will fall between the origins of empire in the early sixteenth century to the demise of imperial Spain in 1898; topics may include cultural exchanges between Spain and Latin America, the Philippines, or the US Southwest. Repeatable for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTSP 50A.

LTSP 119C. Cervantes: Don Quixote (4)

Close reading of the 1605 and 1615 texts with special attention to the social and cultural background of the early seventeenth century in Spain. Prerequisites: LTSP 50A and either 50B or 50C.

LTSP 123. Topics in Modern Spanish Culture (4)

Investigation of selected topics concerning Spanish cultural production after 1800. Topics might focus on a genre (film, popular novel, theatre) or on the transformations of a theme or metaphor (nation, femininity, the uncanny). Repeatable for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTSP 50A.

LTSP 129. Spanish Writing after 1939 (4)

Analysis and discussion of literary production during and after the Franco dictatorship. May focus on specific genres, sub-period, or issues. Repeatable for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTSP 50A.

LTSP 130A. Development of Spanish Literature (4)

An introduction to the major movements and periods of Spanish literary history, centered on close reading of representative texts, but aimed at providing a sense of the scope of Spanish literature and its relation to the course of Spain’s cultural and social history. This course is required of all Spanish literature majors. It is strongly recommended that this course be taken before any other upper-division Spanish (peninsular) literature course. Prerequisites: LTSP 50A and either 50B or 50C.

LTSP 130B. Development of Latin American Literature (4)

An introduction to major movements and periods in Latin American literature, centered on a study of key works from pre-Columbian to the present time. Texts will be seen within their sociohistorical context and in relation to main artistic trends of the period. This course is required of all Spanish literature majors. It is strongly recommended that this course be taken before any other upper-division Latin American literature course. Prerequisites: LTSP 50A and either 50B or 50C.

LTSP 133. Contemporary Latin American Literature (4)

A study of the major literary works and problems in Latin America from 1900 to the present as seen against the historical context of the period. Repeatable for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTSP 50B or 50C.

LTSP 134. Literature of the Southern Cone (4)

Study of movements, traditions, key authors, or major trends in Argentine, Paraguayan, Uruguayan, and Chilean literatures, such as gaucho poetry, the realist novel, modern urban narratives, and the Borges School, etc. Repeatable for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTSP 50B or 50C.

LTSP 135A. Mexican Literature before 1910 (4)

Explores the relationships among cultural production, politics, and societal changes in Mexico before the 1910 Revolution, specifically the roles of intellectuals and popular culture in nation-building and modernization. Readings may include didactic literature and historiographic writings, forms of popular discourse, as well as novels and poetry. Repeatable for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTSP 50B or 50C.

LTSP 135B. Modern Mexican Literature (4)

Study of popular novels, movements, traditions, key authors, or major trends in modern Mexican literature. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTSP 50B or 50C.

LTSP 136. Andean Literatures (4)

Study of movements, traditions, key authors, or major trends in Peruvian, Ecuadorian, and Bolivian literatures, such as indigenismo, urban narrative, and the works of authors such as Vallejo, Icaza, Arguedas, Vargas Llosa. Repeatable for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTSP 50B or 50C.

LTSP 137. Caribbean Literature (4)

Study of movements, traditions, key authors, or major trends in Caribbean literature in Spanish, such as the romantic movement, the literature of independence, the essay tradition, Afro-Antillean literature, the historical novel. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTSP 138. Central American Literature (4)

Study of movements, traditions, key authors, or major trends in the literatures of Guatemala, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Honduras, Costa Rica, and Panama, such as the anti-imperialist novel, indigenismo, guerrilla poetry, and testimonio. Repeatable for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTSP 50B or 50C.

LTSP 140. Latin American Novel (4)

A study in depth of selected novelists of Latin America. May be organized around a specific theme or idea that is traced in its development through the narratives. Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisites: LTSP 50B or 50C.

LTSP 141. Latin American Poetry (4)

A critical study of some of the major poets of Latin America, focusing on the poet’s central themes, the evolution of poetic style, and the significance of the poetry to the historical context. May be repeated as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTSP 50B or 50C.

LTSP 142. Latin American Short Story (4)

Readings and interpretation of the Latin American short story. Focus is primarily nineteenth and/or twentieth century. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTSP 50B or 50C.

LTSP 150A. Early Latino/a-Chicano/a Cultural Production: 1848 to 1960 (4)

Cross-disciplinary study of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Latino/a-Chicano/a literature, folklore, music, testimonio, or other cultural practices. Specific periods covered will fall between the immediate aftermath of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo to the Cuban revolution. Repeatable for credit when topics vary. Prerequisites: LTSP 50B or 50C.

LTSP 150B. Contemporary Chicano/a-Latino/a Cultural Production: 1960 to Present (4)

Cross-disciplinary study of late twentieth-century Latino/a-Chicano/a literature, the visual and performing arts, film, or other cultural practices. Specific periods covered will fall between the Kennedy years to the era of neoliberalism and the creation of “Hispanic” or Latino identities. Repeatable for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTSP 50B or 50C.

LTSP 151. Topics in Chicano/a-Latino/a Cultures (4)

Cross-disciplinary study of late twentieth-century Chicano/a-Latino/a literature, the visual and performing arts, film, or other cultural practices. Representative areas of study are social movements, revolution, immigration, globalization, gender and sexuality, cultures of the US-Mexico border, and Chicano/a-Mexicano/a literary relations. Repeatable for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTSP 50B or 50C.

LTSP 154. Latino/a and Chicano/a Literature (4)

This course will study the representation of a variety of social issues (immigration, racism, class differences, violence, inter/intra-ethnic relations, etc.) in works written in Spanish by Latino/a and Chicano/a writers. Repeatable for credit as topics, texts, and historical periods vary. Prerequisites: LTSP 50B or 50C.

LTSP 159.  Methodological Approaches to the Study of History and Culture in Latin America and the Caribbean (4)

An introduction to methodological and historical trends in Latin American and Caribbean cultural and literary studies. This course includes cultural representations from Latin America and the Caribbean such as film, literature, art, music, and/or photography. May be repeated for credit three times as topics vary.

LTSP 160. Spanish Phonetics (4)

A comparative study of the English and Spanish phonetic systems. Includes a study of the organs of articulation, manner of articulation stress and intonation patterns, as well as dialectal variations of Spanish. Prerequisites: upper-division standing, LTSP 50A or 50B or 50C, or consent of instructor.

LTSP 162. Spanish Language in the United States (4)

A sociolinguistic study of the popular dialects in the United States of America and their relation to other Latin American dialects. The course will cover phonological and syntactic differences between the dialects as well as the influence of English on the Southwest dialects.

LTSP 170. Contemporary Theories of Cultural Production (4)

Selected readings in recent cultural and literary theory. Students will be exposed to a variety of methodologies drawn from the Latin American, European, and US traditions. Final project consists of a practical “application” of a method or methods to a specific cultural object. This course is recommended for students who plan to pursue graduate work in literature. Prerequisites: LTSP 50A or 50B or 50C.

LTSP 171. Studies in Peninsular and/or Latin American Literature and Society (4)

Focus on the interaction between literary expression and the study of society, covering issues such as the sociology of literature, the historical novel, literature and social change, the writer as the intellectual. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTSP 172. Indigenista Themes in Latin American Literature (4)

Study of the literary modes by which nineteenth- and twentieth-century authors have interpreted the themes of indigenous survival and resistance in Latin America, primarily in Mexico and the Andean region. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTSP 50B or 50C.

LTSP 174. Topics in Culture and Politics (4)

Study of the relationships between cultural production (literature, film, popular cultures), social change, and political conflict, covering topics such as colonialism, imperialism, modernization, social movements, dictatorship, revolution. Repeatable for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTSP 50A or 50B or 50C.

LTSP 175. Gender, Sexuality, and Culture (4)

This course will examine issues of gender, sexuality, and culture in Spanish, Latin American, and/or Chicana/o literatures. Repeatable for credit as topics, texts, and historical periods vary. Prerequisites: LTSP 50A or 50B or 50C.

LTSP 176. Literature and Nation (4)

Study of literature as a means through which the nation has been imagined and as a site of debates over national identity and citizenship. Course materials may focus on Spain and/or Latin America. Repeatable for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: LTSP 50A or 50B or 50C.

LTSP 177. Literary and Historical Migrations (4)

This course will focus on a variety of Latin American and/or Spanish intra- and inter-national migrations throughout the world and on the literature produced by these exiles or immigrants. Repeatable for credit as topics, texts, and historical periods vary. Prerequisites: LTSP 50A or 50B or 50C.

LTSP 192. Senior Seminar in Literatures in Spanish (1)

The Senior Seminar Program is designed to allow senior undergraduates to meet with faculty members in a small group setting to explore an intellectual topic in literature (at the upper-division level). Senior Seminars may be offered in all campus departments. Topics will vary from quarter to quarter. Senior Seminars may be taken for credit up to four times, with a change in topic, and permission of the department. Enrollment is limited to twenty students, with preference given to seniors. Prerequisites: department stamp and/or consent of instructor.

LTSP 196. Honors Thesis (4)

Senior thesis research and writing for students who have been accepted for the Literature Honors Program and who have completed LTWL 191. Oral Exam. Prerequisites: department approval.

LTSP 199. Special Studies (2 or 4)

Tutorial: individual guided reading in areas of Spanish literature not normally covered in courses. May be repeated for credit three times. (P/NP grades only.) Prerequisites: upper-division standing and department approval.

Graduate

Prerequisites: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

LTSP 224. Golden Age Studies (4)

Consideration of one or more major figures, texts, trends, or problems in Spanish Golden Age studies. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTSP 258. Spanish American Prose (4)

Consideration of one or more major figures, texts, trends, or problems in Spanish American prose. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTSP 272. Literature and Society Studies (4)

Special topics in practical criticism involving social and economic historical perspectives. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTSP 275. Latin American(ist) Literary and Cultural Theories since the 1960s (4)

A historical survey of late twentieth-century literary and cultural criticism in and about Latin America, focusing on questions of political economy and periodization; cultural heterogeneity and transculturation; gender and sexuality; and the relationships between literary, popular, and mass cultures.

LTSP 295. MA Thesis (1–8)

Research for the master’s thesis. Open for repeated registration up to eight units. (S/U grades only.)

LTSP 296. Research Practicum (1–12)

Research project to be developed by a small group of students under the continued direction of individual faculty members. Primarily a continuation of a previous graduate seminar. The 296 courses do not count toward the seminar requirement. Repeatable for credit.

LTSP 297. Directed Studies: Reading Course (1–12)

This course may be designed according to an individual student’s needs when seminar offerings do not cover subjects, genres, or authors of interest. No paper required. The 297 courses do not count toward the seminar requirement. Repeatable for credit.

LTSP 298. Special Projects: Writing Course (1–12)

Similar to a 297, but a paper is required. Papers are usually on subjects not covered by seminar offerings. Up to two 298s may be applied toward the twelve-seminar requirement of the doctoral program. Repeatable for credit.

LTSP 299. Dissertation (1–12)

Research for the dissertation. Offered for repeated registration. Open only to PhD students who have advanced to candidacy.

LITERATURE/THEORY

Courses in theory may apply to various literature majors. Please consult your adviser.

Additional theory courses are offered in the various department sections. See quarterly course descriptions in the Department of Literature office, first floor LIT building.

Upper Division

Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites may be specified below.

LTTH 110. History of Criticism (4)

A critical and interpretive review of some of the major documents in criticism from the classical period to the present time.

LTTH 115. Introduction to Critical Theory (4)

A critical review of major contemporary theories of the nature of literature, its sociocultural function, and appropriate modes of evaluation.

LTTH 150. Topics in Critical Theory (4)

Selected topics in critical theory such as a particular mode of literary theory; comparative study of theories of text and image; a problem or theme in the history of theory; and issues involved in the relationship between fiction and other discourses (science, law, history, philosophy, music). Repeatable for credit when topics vary.

LTTH 198. Directed Group Study (4)

Directed group study, under the guidance of a member of the faculty, in an area not covered in courses currently offered by the department. (P/NP only.)

LTTH 199. Special Studies (2 or 4)

Individual reading in an area not covered in courses currently offered by the department. (P/NP only.)

Graduate

Prerequisites: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

LTTH 200A. Text/Culture/Critical Practice (4)

An introduction to theories and practices of literary and cultural criticism. Topics may vary, but emphasis will be on terminology, methods of readings, modes of interdisciplinary analysis and argumentation, recent debates on questions of theory, history, textual scholarships, etc. Prerequisites: registered doctoral student in literature and department stamp.

LTTH 200B. Problems in Contemporary Literary Theory (4)

The focus is feminist literary/cultural theories and their relations with major contemporary theoretical discourses (e.g., psychoanalysis, poststructuralism, and various forms of historicism). Prerequisites: LTTH 200A, registered doctoral student in literature, and department stamp.

LTTH 200C. Cultural Perspectives and Cultural Criticism (4)

Literary and cultural relations between the First and Third Worlds, colonialism and neo-colonialism, orality and literacy, construction of ethnicity, formation of canon, and popular culture and the market. Prerequisites: LTTH 200B, department stamp, and registered doctoral student in literature.

LTTH 201. Contemporary Theoretical Debates and Critical Discourses (4)

An introduction to a wide range of theoretical and methodological issues, schools of thought, and interpretative styles in contemporary literary studies. Required of all MA students in the Department of Literature, normally in their first quarter in the program. Prerequisites: admission to the MA program in the Department of Literature or consent of instructor.

LTTH 220. Theories of Literary Criticism (4)

Close study of any of the several bodies of literary theory currently applied to literary criticism: psychoanalytic, Marxist, historicist, semiotic, feminist, hermeneutic, reader response, among others. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

LTTH 250. Writing and Theory (4)

An overview of issues in modern critical theory as they pertain to writers. Will focus on issues of textuality, cultural forms, and aesthetics as they impact the process and meaning of writing. Prerequisites: department approval.

LTTH 255. Modern Art Movements and Aesthetics (4)

An introduction to modernist aesthetics with a focus on art and literary movements. Particular attention to be placed on relationships between modern literary movements (realism, imagism, surrealism) and their counterparts in visual arts, music, dance, and theatre, and the ways in which literary movements are components of or responses to issues of political and social identity. Prerequisites: department approval.

LTTH 298. Special Projects: Writing Course (1–12)

Similar to a 297, but a paper is required. Papers are usually on subjects not covered by seminar offerings. Up to two 298s may be applied toward the twelve-seminar requirement of the doctoral program. Repeatable for credit.

LITERATURES OF THE WORLD

African Literatures

Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites may be specified below.

LTAF 110. African Oral Literature (4)

Survey of various genres of African and oral literary traditions. Oral narrative genres, investigation of proverb, riddle, praise poetry, and epic. Development and use of a methodology to analyze aspects of performance, composition, and education in oral traditional systems.

LTAF 120. Literature and Film of Modern Africa (4)

This course traces the rise of modern literature in traditional African societies disrupted by the colonial and neocolonial experience. Contemporary films by African and Western artists will provide an additional insight into the complex social self-images of the continent.

Literatures of the Americas

Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites may be specified below.

Foreign language discussion sections (XLs) may be offered in conjunction with courses taught in translation. Students enrolled in these joint courses may use them to fulfill major, minor, and secondary literature requirements. Please see the undergraduate office for further information.

LTAM 87. Freshman Seminar (1)

The Freshman Seminar Program is designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small seminar setting. Freshman Seminars are offered in all campus departments and undergraduate colleges, and topics vary from quarter to quarter. Enrollment is limited to fifteen to twenty students, with preference given to entering freshmen.

LTAM 100. Latino/a Cultures in the United States (4)

An introductory historical and cultural overview of the various Latino/a populations in the United States with a study of representative cultural texts.

LTAM 101. Early Latino/a-Chicano/a Cultures: 1848–1960 (4)

A cross-disciplinary study of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Latino/a-Chicano/a literature, the visual and performing arts, and other cultural practices. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTAM 105. Gender and Sexuality in Latino/a Cultural Production (4)

A study of the construction of differences in gender and sexual orientation in Latino/a-Chicano/a literature and other cultural production with an emphasis on examining various theoretical/ideological perspectives on these issues. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTAM 106. Modern Chicana and Mexican Women Writings (4)

A study of themes and issues in the writings of Chicana and Mexican women with a view toward establishing connections while recognizing national and cultural differences between the two. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTAM 107. Comparative Latino/a and US Ethnic Cultures (4)

A comparative and intersecting study of Latino/a and other US ethnic cultures. Literary texts will be viewed as “windows” into real time and spaces where cultures meet and mix. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTAM 108. Chicano/a and Latino/a Cultures: Intellectual and Political Traditions (4)

The course will center on Chicano/a-Latino/a writers and movements of literary, intellectual, cultural, or political significance. Texts may be read in the original language or in English. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTAM 109. Cultural Production of the Latino/a Diasporas (4)

A study of the cultural production of Latino/a immigrant groups with a focus on the literary representation of homeland, national culture, and the forces that led to migration. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTAM 110. Latin American Literature in Translation (4)

Reading of representative works in Latin American literature with a view to literary analysis (form, theme, meaning), the developmental processes of the literature, and the many contexts: historical, social, cultural. Texts may be read in English. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTAM 111. Comparative Caribbean Discourse (4)

Comparative survey of Caribbean literatures from the Spanish, French, English, and Dutch Caribbean. Literary texts trace historical paradigms including the development of plantation slavery, emancipation, the quest for nationhood, migration, and transnational identities. Films and music may complement discussion.

LTAM 130. Reading North by South (4)

An analysis of the readings and appropriations of European and US traditions by Latin American, Caribbean, and Filipino writers. The course addresses philosophies, ideologies, and cultural movements and explores the specific literary strategies used by authors in constructing their particular “cosmovisión.”

LTAM 140. Topics in Culture and Politics (4)

Study of the relationships between cultural production (literature, film, popular culture), social change, and political conflict, covering topics such as colonialism, imperialism, modernization, social movements, dictatorship, and revolution. Repeatable for credit when topics vary.

LTAM 192. Senior Seminar in Literatures of the Americas (1)

The Senior Seminar Program is designed to allow senior undergraduates to meet with faculty members in a small group setting to explore an intellectual topic in literature (at the upper-division level). Senior Seminars may be offered in all campus departments. Topics will vary from quarter to quarter. Senior Seminars may be taken for credit up to four times, with a change in topic, and permission of the department. Enrollment is limited to twenty students, with preference given to seniors. Prerequisites: department stamp and/or consent of instructor.

East Asian Literatures

Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites may be specified below.

Foreign language discussion sections (XLs) may be offered in conjunction with courses taught in translation. Students enrolled in these joint courses may use them to fulfill major, minor, and secondary literature requirements. Please see the undergraduate office for further information.

LTEA 100A. Classical Chinese Poetry in Translation (4)

A survey of different genres of traditional Chinese poetry from various periods.

LTEA 100B. Modern Chinese Poetry in Translation (4)

A survey of Chinese poetry written in the vernacular from 1918 to 1949.

LTEA 100C. Contemporary Chinese Poetry in Translation (4)

A survey of Chinese poetic development from 1949 to the present.

LTEA 110A. Classical Chinese Fiction in Translation (4)

The course will focus on a few representative masterpieces of Chinese literature in its classical age, with emphasis on the formal conventions and the social or intellectual presuppositions that are indispensable to their understanding. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

LTEA 110B. Modern Chinese Fiction in Translation (4)

A survey of representative works of the modern period from 1919 to 1949. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

LTEA 120A. Chinese Films (4)

A survey of representative films from different periods of Chinese cinematic development. Priority may be given to Chinese studies majors and literature majors. Repeatable for credit when topics vary.

LTEA 120B. Taiwan Films (4)

A survey of “New Taiwan Cinema” of the eighties and nineties. Priority may be given to Chinese studies majors and literature majors. Repeatable for credit when topics vary.

LTEA 120C. Hong Kong Films (4)

An examination of representative works of different film genres from Hong Kong. Priority may be given to Chinese studies majors and literature majors. Repeatable for credit when topics vary.

LTEA 132. Later Japanese Literature in Translation (4)

An introduction to later Japanese (kogo) literature in translation. Will focus on several “modern” works, placing their form in the historical context. No knowledge of Japanese required. Repeatable for credit when topics vary.

LTEA 138. Japanese Films (4)

An introduction to Japanese films. Attention given to representative Japanese directors (e.g., Ozu), form (e.g., anime), genre (e.g. feminist revenge horror), or historical context in which films are produced. Priority may be given to Japanese studies majors and literature majors.

LTEA 140. Modern Korean Literature in Translation from Colonial Period (4)

A survey of modern Korean prose fiction and poetry from the colonial period. Exploration of major issues such as Japanese colonization, rise of left-wing and right-wing nationalisms, construction of national culture, and relations between tradition and modernity.

LTEA 141. Modern Korean Literature in Translation from 1945 to Present (4)

A survey of modern Korean prose fiction and poetry from 1945 to the 1990s. Examination of literary representations of national division, the Korean War, accelerated industrialization, authoritarian rule, and the labor/agrarian movements.

LTEA 142. Korean Film, Literature, and Popular Culture (4)

A study of modern Korean society and its major historical issues as represented in film, literature, and other popular cultural media such as TV and music video. We will explore additional issues such as cinematic adaptations of prose fiction, fluid distinctions between popular literature and “serious” literature, and the role of mass media under authoritarian rule.

LTEA 143. Gender and Sexuality in Korean Literature and Culture (4)

A study of constructions of gender and sexuality in premodern and modern Korean societies. We will discuss literary works as well as historical and ethnographic works on gender relations, representations of masculinity and femininity, and changing roles of men and women in work and family.

LTEA 144. Korean American Literature and Other Literatures of Korean Diaspora (4)

An examination of the experiences of the Korean diaspora linked to the historical contexts of modern Korea, Japan, the United States, and other countries. We will focus on literature both about Korea and the Korean immigrant experience written in the United States but will also read from and about other Korean diasporic contexts.

LTEA 151. Readings in Tagalog Literature and Culture I (4)

Course will concentrate on selections of literature, history, and cultural texts (painting, drama, religious artifacts) of the 1896 Philippine revolution and the succeeding US takeover of the Philippines. Intermediate fluency in speaking, reading, and writing Tagalog. Repeatable for credit when topics vary.

LTEA 152A. Topics in Filipino Literature and Culture (Nineteenth Century–World War II) (4)

Surveys the authors, intellectual currents, and cultural politics of Filipino culture from the 1850s to World War II. Topics may include the legacy of Spanish colonialism, European enlightenment, and the emergence of nationalism and socialism, and Filipino literature in English. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTEA 152B. Topics in Filipino Literature and Culture (World War II–Present) (4)

Surveys the authors, intellectual currents, and cultural politics of Filipino culture from World War II to the present. Topics may include the dual lingua franca, the birth of “Filipino-American” literature, the culture of dictatorship, and new approaches to narrative. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTEA 199. Special Studies (2 or 4)

Tutorial; individual guided reading in areas not normally covered in courses. (P/NP grades only.)

European and Eurasian Literatures

Lower Division

LTEU 87. Freshman Seminar (1)

The Freshman Seminar Program is designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small seminar setting. Freshman Seminars are offered in all campus departments and undergraduate colleges, and topics vary from quarter to quarter. Enrollment is limited to fifteen to twenty students, with preference given to entering freshmen.

Upper Division

Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites may be specified below.

Foreign language discussion sections (XLs) may be offered in conjunction with courses taught in translation. Students enrolled in these joint courses may use them to fulfill major, minor, and secondary literature requirements. Please see the undergraduate office for further information.

LTEU 105. Medieval Studies (4)

Studies in medieval culture and thought with focus on one of the “three crowns” of Italian literature: Dante, Boccaccio, or Petrarca. May be repeated for credit when course content varies.

LTEU 109. Studies in Eighteenth-Century European Literature (4)

Topics to be considered include the age of sensibility, enlightenment, neoclassicism. Attention given to historical and cultural contexts.

LTEU 110. European Romanticism (4)

Attention given to historical and cultural contexts. Topics to be considered include the concept of nature, the reaction to science, the role of the imagination.

LTEU 111. European Realism (4)

This course focuses on nineteenth-century European realism in historical and cultural context. Topics include definitions of realism, the impact of urbanization and industrialization on literary forms and themes, and relations between realism in literature and the visual arts. May be repeated up to three times for credit when topics vary.

LTEU 125. Faust in European Literature (4)

This course focuses on the theme of Faust in European literature from the Renaissance to the present, including works by Marlowe, Goethe, Bulgakov, and Thomas Mann. Concentration on how authors adapted the theme to differing national and historical contexts.

LTEU 130. German Literature in Translation (4)

One or more aspects of German literature, such as major authors, the contemporary novel, nineteenth-century poetry, German expressionism. Texts may be read in English or the original language. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTEU 137. Seminars in German Culture (4)

These seminars are devoted to a variety of special topics, including the works of single authors, genre studies, problems in literary history, relations between literature and the history of ideas, literary criticism, literature and society, and the like.

LTEU 139. Marx/Nietzsche/Freud (4)

Intensive examination of the major ideas of all three writers, with special attention to the literary styles and problematic aspects of their work.

LTEU 140. Italian Literature in Translation (4)

One or more periods and authors in Italian literature. Texts will be read in English. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTEU 145. Studies in Modern Italian Poetry (4)

Study of the chief modern Italian poets, including Montale, Ungaretti, and Quasimodo, with attention to long, poetic form and contemporary Italian culture. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTEU 147. Women in Italy (4)

A study of historical, political, and literary texts regarding women and feminism in Italian society.

LTEU 150A-B-C. Survey of Russian and Soviet Literature in Translation, 1800 to the Present (4-4-4)

A study of literary works from Pushkin to the present.

150A. 1800–1860

150B. 1860–1917

150C. 1917–present

LTEU 154. Russian Culture (4)

An introduction to Russia’s past and present through the cross-disciplinary study of literature, the visual and performing arts, social and political thought, civic rituals, popular entertainments, values and practices from 1825 to the present.

LTEU 158. Single Author in Russian Literature in Translation (4)

A study of literary works by a single Russian author. All readings will be in English. May be repeated for credit when authors vary.

LTEU 192. Senior Seminar in European and Eurasian Literatures (1)

The Senior Seminar Program is designed to allow senior undergraduates to meet with faculty members in a small group setting to explore an intellectual topic in literature (at the upper-division level). Senior Seminars may be offered in all campus departments. Topics will vary from quarter to quarter. Senior Seminars may be taken for credit up to four times, with a change in topic, and permission of the department. Enrollment is limited to twenty students, with preference given to seniors. Prerequisites: department stamp and/or consent of instructor.

Near Eastern Literatures

Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites may be specified below.

Foreign language discussion sections (XLs) may be offered in conjunction with courses taught in translation. Students enrolled in these joint courses may use them to fulfill major, minor, and secondary literature requirements. Please see the undergraduate office for further information.

LITERATURES OF THE WORLD

In both lower- and upper-division world literature courses, texts may be read in English translation when necessary, and lectures and discussions are conducted in English.

Foreign language discussion sections (XLs) may be offered in conjunction with courses taught in translation. Students enrolled in these joint courses may use them to fulfill major, minor, and secondary literature requirements. Please see the undergraduate office for further information.

Lower Division

LTWL 4A-C-D-F-M. Film and Fiction in Twentieth-Century Societies (4)

A study of modern culture and of the way it is expressed and understood in novels, stories, and films. The sequence aims at an understanding of relationship between the narrative arts and society in the twentieth century, with the individual quarters treating fiction and film of the following language groups. 4A French, 4C Asian, 4D Italian, 4M multiple national literatures and film, 4F Spanish.

LTWL 19A-B-C. Introduction to the Ancient Greeks and Romans (4-4-4)

An introductory study of ancient Greece and Rome, their literature, myth, philosophy, history, and art.

LTWL 50. Introduction to Literary and Cultural Studies (4)

A preliminary survey of issues and problems raised by literary and cultural studies. Discussion will focus on basic terms in literary analysis (narrative, genre, character, poetics) and on rhetorical techniques for writing advanced expository papers in literary and cultural topics. It is designed for both nonmajors and students who anticipate becoming majors in literature who would like a broad-based introduction to the field.

LTWL 87. Freshman Seminar (1)

The Freshman Seminar Program is designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small seminar setting. Freshman Seminars are offered in all campus departments and undergraduate colleges, and topics vary from quarter to quarter. Enrollment is limited to fifteen to twenty students, with preference given to entering freshmen.

TWS 21-22-23-24-25-26. Third World Literatures (4-4-4-4-4-4)

(See entry under “Third World Studies” heading.)

The courses in this sequence are equivalent to world literature courses. The sequence satisfies Marshall College general-education requirements.

Upper Division

Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites may be specified below.

LTWL 100. Mythology (4)

A study of various bodies of myth: their content, form, and meaning. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTWL 102. Women in Antiquity (4)

Selected topics in classical culture, including women and myth, women in Greek and Roman society, and the representation of women in classical literature. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

LTWL 106. The Classical Tradition (4)

Greek and Roman literature in translation. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTWL 107. Prose Fiction (4)

Aspects of prose fiction. Not confined to a single national literature. Texts may be read in English. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTWL 108. Words and Their Vicissitudes (4)

The history of English and its forebears, focusing on the quirky nature of semantic change in order to equip students with a basis for evaluating metaphor, metonymy, and other forms of verbal deviance.

LTWL 110B. Folk and Fairy Tales (4)

A study of folk and fairy tales from various cultures, from the point of view of literary form, psychological meaning, and cultural function. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTWL 111. Medieval Studies (4)

A lecture/discussion course designed to explore a variety of topics in medieval literatures and cultures. Topics may include a genre or combination of genres (e.g., drama, romance, lyric, allegory), or a central theme (e.g., the Crusades or courtly love).

LTWL 114. Children’s Literature (4)

A study of literature written for children in various cultures and periods. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTWL 115. Contemporary Literature (4)

A study of novels and authors of the present and recent times. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTWL 116. Adolescent Literature (4)

A study of fiction written for the young adult in various cultures and periods. Consideration will be given to the young adult hero in fiction. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTWL 120. Popular Literature and Culture (4)

A study of various popular forms—such as pop music, cult books, film, fashion, magazines, graphic arts—within a broader cultural context. Focus may be on a particular genre (e.g., best sellers) or era (e.g., the sixties). May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

LTWL 122. Fantasy (4)

Reading and analysis of various works that fall into several categories of the fantastic—e.g., heroic, gothic, irrealist, postmodern—with particular attention to the cultural uses of myth, folklore, and fantasy, and to the psychological and structuralist theories of same. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

LTWL 123. Vampires in Literature (4)

A study of representations of the vampire through a variety of methodological perspectives with an emphasis on historical context and cultural symbolism.

LTWL 124. Science Fiction (4)

An exploration of the genre—past and present, in literature and the visual media—as a cultural response to scientific and technological change, as modern mythmaking, and as an enterprise serving a substantial fan subculture. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

LTWL 128. Introduction to Semiotics and Applications (4)

Semiotics, basically a theory of signification, describes the models and conceptual constructs through which meaning is grasped and produced. Background in the history of semiotics and its dominant models.

LTWL 129. Wisdom: The Literature of Authority (4)

What is wisdom? Does wisdom refer to a specific type of discourse; a literary genre; a specific content that holds true transculturally and transtemporally? This class will consider these questions by reading literature from diverse times and places.

LTWL 134. Cinema and Islam (4)

This course examines histories and theories of cinema and Islam. It offers an overview on intersections between film and religious experience in various Muslim cultures, and how such experiences are ultimately grounded in shifting historical and social settings.

LTWL 135. The Buddhist Imaginary (4)

An introduction to the imaginative universe of Indian Buddhism, with a focus on the connection between cosmological models and liberative practices. In this class we read Buddhist narrative and doctrinal literatures, supplemented by archaeological and art historical artifacts.

LTWL 136. Socially Engaged Buddhism (4)

This course explores the writings of Buddhists who actively engage with the problems of the world: social, environmental, economic, political. We will examine the historical development of engaged Buddhism in light of traditional Buddhist concepts of morality, interdependence, and liberation.

LTWL 137. Sanskrit (4)

Study of classical Sanskrit, including grammar and reading.

LTWL 138. Critical Religion Studies (4)

Selected topics, texts, and problems in the study of religion. May be repeated for credit when content varies.

LTWL 139. Gnosticism: The Religious Underground from Late Antiquity to the New Age (4)

A survey of Gnostic currents in religious thought which influenced the Abrahamic traditions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, and which resurfaced periodically as heretical challenges to these mainstream traditions and their doctrinal orthodoxies.

LTWL 140. Novel and History in the Third World (4)

This course sets out to explore the relation between the novel and the “dependent” history of the Third World, contrasting and comparing the uses of history in the European novel as defined in the theoretical analysis of Lukacs with uses of history in the Third World novel. An analysis of major themes and movements common to selected ethnic literature in the United States and national literatures in the Third World.

LTWL 141. Islam and Modernity (4)

A survey of developments in the Islamic world during the period of European colonial domination and its aftermath, with special attention to the works of leading Muslim thinkers (e.g., Sayid Ahmed Khan, Muhammad Abduh, Hasan al Banna, Ruhallah Khomeini, among others).

LTWL 142. Islam: The Origins and Spread of a World Religion (4)

An investigation of the historical and textual beginnings of Islam; the development of the religion in the early Middle Ages; and an examination of the formalization of schools of Islamic law and the confrontation between Suuni and Shii versions of praxis. Concludes with the rise of Islamic modernism and the roots of Islamic fundamentalism.

LTWL 144.  Islam and Cinema (4)

This course examines the relationship between cinema and Islam. It looks at how Islam is represented through various cinematic genres and historical periods from 1920s to the present.

LTWL 147. Readings in Mahayana Buddhism (4)

Students read and discuss Mahayana Buddhist literature, including sutra and narrative literatures, confessional works, doctrinal treatises, and tantric verse. Recommended: completion of LTWL 129 or LTWL 135.

LTWL 149. The Last Turn of the Century in the West (4)

A multimedia examination of the momentous cultural and intellectual changes that accompanied the last turn of the century (nineteenth–twentieth) in the West. Areas covered include literature, philosophy, visual arts, music, religion, social movements, and scientific thought.

LTWL 150. Modernity and Literature (4)

Explores the various cross-cultural historical, philosophical, and aesthetic ideas which formed the basis of most twentieth-century literature. Literature from the Americas, Europe, Asia, and Africa will be studied through lectures and the reading of texts in English translation. Repeatable for credit when topics vary.

LTWL 151. Religion and Politics (4)

Course surveys the historical and theoretical relationships between religion and politics in contemporary South West Asia, focusing on the interplay of religious movements and politics by looking at countries such as Egypt, Iraq, Israel, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, Syria, and Turkey.

LTWL 152. Introduction to Islam (4)

An exploration of the history and religion of Islam, with focus on theological debates, mystical traditions, and ritual life of Islamic societies from the seventh century to the modern period. The rise of Islamist movements in contemporary history will also be discussed.

LTWL 153. Literature, Religion, and Culture in Iran (4)

This interdisciplinary course will explore the relationship between culture and religion in the Persian literature from the Abbasid to postrevolutionary Iranian history.

LTWL 155. Gender Studies (4)

The study of the construction of sexual differences in literature and culture. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

LTWL 157. Iranian Film (4)

Course sets out to explore the history and theory of Iranian films in the context of the country’s political, cultural, and religious settings since 1945. Students are expected to watch and discuss Iranian films, particularly the postrevolutionary films of Kiarostami and Mokhbalbaf.

LTWL 158A. Topics in the New Testament (4)

Literary and socio-historical considerations of the diverse writings that developed into the New Testament. Topics include Jewish origins of the “Jesus movement” within Greco-Roman culture; varying patterns of belief/practice among earliest communities; oral tradition and development of canon.

LTWL 158B. Topics in Early Christian Texts and Cultures (4)

This course investigates the manner in which texts shape religious identities on the individual and communal level in sociohistorical and cultural contexts: various topics include portraits of Jesus, saints lives, death and afterlife, martyrdom, demonology, apocalypticism, Christianity, and empire.

LTWL 158C. Topics in Other Christianities (4)

A survey of the Christian texts that comprise the fatalities of the battles defining Christian canon: e.g., apocryphal acts, noncanonical gospels, and “Gnostic” texts. Considers the social communities, theological views, religious identities, and practices reflected in largely forgotten texts.

LTWL 159. Digital Middle East: Culture, Politics, and Religion (4)

This course examines the role of Information Communication Technologies (ICTs) such as the Internet, mobile, and satellite TV in the reshaping of the Middle East and North Africa. It will focus on how ICTs like the Internet are changing culture, politics, and religion in the region and implication of such transformations.

LTWL 160. Women and Literature (4)

This course will explore the relationship between women and literature, i.e., women as producers of literature, as objects of literary discourse, and as readers. Foreign language texts will be read in translation. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTWL 165. Literature and the Environment (4)

With primarily American (and a couple of English) readings, the course inquires into the relation of human and nonhuman nature. Topics include wilderness, animals, Native American thought, women in nature, description as a kind of writing, the spirituality of place.

LTWL 167. Russia and the Jewish Imagination from the Enlightenment to the Present (4)

Course explores Russian Jewish literature, from Hassidic tales to Gary Shteyngart’s Absurdistan. We will read works translated from Hebrew, Yiddish, and Russian written before, during, and since the Soviet period, including literature produced in Russia, Israel, and the United States.

LTWL 168. Death and Desire in India (4)

This class investigates the link between desire and death in classical and modern Hindu thought. It considers the stories of Hindu deities, as well as the lives of contemporary South Asian men and women, in literature and film.

LTWL 169. Yoga, Body, and Transformation (4)

This class investigates yoga as a practice aimed at integrating the body, intellect, and spirit. It considers a range of sources and representations, from foundational works in classical Sanskrit through the sometimes kitschy, sometimes serious, spirituality of contemporary pop culture.

LTWL 170. Specialized Genres in Literature (4)

The study of literary genres that do not fall into the ordinary categories of lyric, drama, fiction, and prose. May be taken for credit three times as topics vary.

LTWL 172. Special Topics in Literature (4)

Studies in specialized literary, philosophic, and artistic movements, approaches to literature, literary ideas, historical moments, etc.

LTWL 176. Literature and Ideas (4)

The course will center on writers or movements of international literary, cultural, or ideological significance. The texts studied, if foreign, may be read either in the original language or in English. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

LTWL 180. Film Studies and Literature: Film History (4)

The study of film history and its effects upon methods of styles in literary history. Repeatable for credit when topics vary.

LTWL 181. Film Studies and Literature: Film Movement (4)

Study of analogies between literary movements and film movements. Repeatable for credit when topics vary.

LTWL 183. Film Studies and Literature: Director’s Work (4)

Methods of criticism of author’s work applied to the study and analysis of film director’s style and work. Repeatable for credit when topics vary.

LTWL 184. Film Studies and Literature: Close Analysis of Filmic Text (4)

Methods of literary analysis applied to the study of shots, sequences, poetics, and deep structure in filmic discourse. Repeatable for credit when topics vary.

LTWL 191. Honors Seminar (4)

Explorations in critical theory and method. This course, designed to prepare students to write an honors thesis, is open only to literature majors invited into the department’s Honors Program.

LTWL 192. Senior Seminar in Literatures of the World (1)

The Senior Seminar Program is designed to allow senior undergraduates to meet with faculty members in a small group setting to explore an intellectual topic in literature (at the upper-division level). Senior Seminars may be offered in all campus departments. Topics will vary from quarter to quarter. Senior Seminars may be taken for credit up to four times, with a change in topic, and permission of the department. Enrollment is limited to twenty students, with preference given to seniors. Prerequisites: department stamp and/or consent of instructor.

LTWL 196. Honors Thesis (4)

Senior thesis research and writing for students who have been accepted for the Literature Honors Program and who have completed LTWL 191. Oral exam. Prerequisites: department approval.

LTWL 198. Directed Group Study (4)

Research seminars and research, under the direction of faculty member. Prerequisites: department approval.

LTWL 199. Special Studies (2 or 4)

Tutorial; individual guided reading in areas of literature (in translation) not normally covered in courses. May be repeated for credit three times. (P/NP grades only.) Prerequisites: upper-division standing and department approval.

Graduate

LTWL 500. Apprentice Teaching in Literature (2 or 4)

Consideration of pedagogical methods appropriate to undergraduate teaching in literature courses under the supervision of instructor of course. Doctoral students in literature are required to participate in undergraduate teaching for a minimum of twelve units (two to four units per quarter) prior to completion of the PhD degree.

LTWL 501. Apprentice Teaching in Humanities (2 or 4)

Consideration of pedagogical methods appropriate to undergraduate teaching in humanities sequences under the supervision of instructor of course. Doctoral students in literature are required to participate in undergraduate teaching for a minimum of twelve units (two to four units per quarter) prior to completion of the PhD degree.

LTWL 503. Apprentice Teaching in Marshall College (2 or 4)

Consideration of pedagogical methods appropriate to undergraduate teaching in Marshall College courses under the supervision of instructor of course. Doctoral students in literature are required to participate in undergraduate teaching for a minimum of twelve units (two to four units per quarter) prior to completion of the PhD degree.

LTWL 504. Apprentice Teaching in Warren College (2 or 4)

Consideration of pedagogical methods appropriate to undergraduate teaching in Warren College courses under the supervision of instructor of course. Doctoral students in literature are required to participate in undergraduate teaching for a minimum of twelve units (two to four units per quarter) prior to completion of the PhD degree.

LTWL 506. Apprentice Teaching in Roosevelt College (2 or 4)

Consideration of pedagogical methods appropriate to undergraduate teaching in Eleanor Roosevelt College courses under the supervision of instructor of course. Doctoral students in literature are required to participate in undergraduate teaching for a minimum of twelve units (two to four units per quarter) prior to completion of the PhD degree.

WRITING/LITERATURE

Lower Division

LTWR 8A. Writing Fiction (4)

Study of fiction in both theory and practice. Narrative technique studied in terms of subjectivity and atmosphere, description, dialogue, and the editing process will be introduced through readings from the history of the novel and short story. Writing exercises accompany reading assignments. Prerequisites: completion of college writing requirement.

LTWR 8B. Writing Poetry (4)

Study and practice of poetry as artistic and communal expression. Techniques of composition (traditional forms, avant garde techniques, dramatic monologue, performance poetry, and new genre) studied through written and spoken examples of poetry. Writing exercises accompany reading assignments. Prerequisites: completion of college writing requirement.

LTWR 8C. Writing Nonfiction (4)

Study of nonfictional prose in terms of genre and craft. Techniques of composition (journalism, essay, letters, reviews) will be studied through written examples of the genre. Practical imitations and exercises accompany the reading assignments. Prerequisite to upper-division nonfiction prose workshops. Prerequisites: completion of college writing requirement.

Upper Division

Departmental approval is required for enrollment in all upper-division literature/writing courses.

Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites may be specified below.

(See “Department of Theatre and Dance” for course offerings in dramatic writing.)

Prose Fiction, Poetry, Media Workshops

LTWR 100. Short Fiction Workshop (4)

A workshop for students with some experience and special interest in writing fiction. This workshop is designed to encourage regular writing in the short forms of prose fiction and to permit students to experiment with various forms. There will be discussion of student work, together with analysis and discussion of representative examples of short fiction from the present and previous ages. May be taken for credit three times. Prerequisites: LTWR 8A; department approval.

LTWR 101. Writing Fiction in Spanish (4)

A workshop for students with interest in writing fiction in Spanish. Includes discussion of student work, together with analysis and discussion of representative examples of short fiction from the present and previous ages. A working knowledge of Spanish is required. May be taken for credit three times. Prerequisites: LTWR 8A; LTSP 50A or 50B or 50C; department approval.

LTWR 102. Poetry Workshop (4)

A workshop for students with some experience and special interest in writing poetry. This workshop is designed to encourage regular writing of poetry. There will be discussion of student work, together with analysis and discussion of representative examples of poetry from the present and previous ages. May be taken for credit three times. Prerequisites: LTWR 8B; department approval.

LTWR 104A. The Novella I (4)

A two-quarter workshop for fiction writers ready to explore a longer form, and committed to developing a single piece over the course of two consecutive quarters. In addition to analyzing student work, we will read and discuss a wide range of published novellas. Two-quarter sequence; students must complete LTWR 104A and LTWR 104B in order to receive final grade in both courses. Prerequisites: LTWR 100; department approval.

LTWR 104B. The Novella II (4)

A continuation of LTWR 104A in which fiction writers complete the novella manuscripts they began during the previous quarter. Each student will produce a novella of at least fifty revised pages by the end of the quarter. We will continue to read and discuss published novellas with a particular emphasis on narrative strategy, structure, and revision. Two-quarter sequence; students must complete LTWR 104A and LTWR 104B in order to receive final grade in both courses. Prerequisites: LTWR 104A; department approval.

LTWR 106. Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Irrealism Workshop (4)

In this workshop, students will practice skills of narration, characterization, and style with particular attention to the demands of nonrealistic genres, especially the challenge of suspending disbelief in fictional environments that defy conventional logic. Readings and lectures will accompany writing exercises. May be taken for credit three times. Prerequisites: LTWR 8A; department approval.

LTWR 113. Intercultural Writing Workshop (4)

This course is an introduction to modes of writing from other cultural systems vastly different from the cultural-aesthetic assumptions of Anglo-American writing. While disclosing the limitations of the English language, this course attempts to provide new language strategies for students. May be taken for credit three times. Prerequisites: LTWR 8A, 8B, or 8C; department approval.

LTWR 114. Graphic Texts Workshop (4)

From illuminated manuscripts to digital literature, from alphabets to concrete poems, from artists’ books to comics, this course explores the histories and techniques of combinatory image/word literary arts. The course may emphasize specific movements or genres. May be taken for credit three times. Prerequisites: LTWR 8A or 8B or 8C; department approval.

LTWR 115. Experimental Writing Workshop (4)

This workshop explores writing for which the traditional generic distinctions of prose/poetry, fiction/documentary, narrative/discourse do not apply. Students taking this course will be asked to challenge the boundaries of literature to discover new forms and modes of expression. May be taken for credit three times. Prerequisites: LTWR 8A, 8B, or 8C; department approval.

LTWR 119. Writing for Performance (4)

A workshop and survey of experimental approaches to the writing and production of performance works in a range of literary genres. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of written texts with nonverbal elements from the visual arts, theatre, and music. Prerequisites: LTWR 8A or 8B, to be determined by quarterly offerings of LTWR 119; department approval.

Nonfiction Prose Workshops

LTWR 120. Personal Narrative Workshop (4)

A workshop designed to encourage regular writing of all forms of personal experience narrative, including journals, autobiography, firsthand biography, and firsthand chronicle. Instructor and students will discuss student work as well as published personal narratives. May be taken for credit three times. Prerequisites: LTWR 8A, 8B, or 8C; department approval.

LTWR 121. Media Writing Workshop (4)

Workshop focusing on the review, the op-ed piece, the column, the blurb, the profile, the interview, and “content-providing” for websites. We’ll examine current examples of media writing; students will produce a body of work and critique one another’s productions. May be taken for credit three times. Prerequisites: LTWR 8C; department approval.

LTWR 122. Writing for the Sciences Workshop (4)

A workshop in writing about science for the public. Students will study and then construct metaphors or analogues that introduce readers to scientific perplexities. Completion of LTWR 8A, 8B, or 8C highly recommended. May be repeated for credit three times. Prerequisites: department approval.

LTWR 124. Translation of Literary Texts Workshop (4)

A writing workshop on the theory and practice of literary translation. Students will translate literary texts and workshop with the instructor and other course members. Selected readings in translation theory. May be taken for credit three times. Prerequisites: LTWR 8A, 8B, or 8C; department approval.

LTWR 126. Creative Nonfiction Workshop (4)

A writing, reading, and critical-thinking workshop designed to produce nonfiction pieces that fall outside the limits of the essay form. Included are travel narratives, memoir, and information-based writing that transform their own materials into compelling literature. May be repeated for credit three times. Prerequisites: LTWR 8C; department approval.

LTWR 129. Distributing Literature Workshop (4)

Workshop designed to critique and engage the means of distributing literature within culture. Publishing from “zine” through mainstream publication; web publishings; readings and “slams”; publicity and funding; colloquia with writers; politics and literature; and the uses of performance and media. May be taken for credit three times. Prerequisites: LTWR 100, LTWR 102, or LTWR 120; department approval.

Writing Process, Written Discourse, and Writing Pedagogy

These courses are not writing workshop courses like those listed above. Rather, they examine various aspects of writing as a field of study and writing pedagogy. Writing majors who plan to teach writing may be particularly interested in these courses. See the department for applicability of these courses to the writing major requirements.

Note: As of fall 1991, all writing majors are required to take one course chosen from offerings numbered LTWR 140–148 to fulfill one of their upper-division requirements.

LTWR 143. Stylistics and Grammar (4)

A close look at sentence-level features of written discourse–stylistics and sentence grammars. Students will review recent research on these topics and experiment in their own writing with various stylistic and syntactic options. Prerequisites: department approval.

LTWR 144. The Teaching of Writing (4)

Wide reading in current theory and practice of teaching writing in schools and colleges. Careful attention to various models of classroom writing instruction and to different approaches in the individual conference. Students in this course may observe instruction in the UC San Diego college writing programs or tutor freshman students in those programs. Prerequisites: department approval.

LTWR 148. Theory for Writers/Writing for Theory (4)

Hybrid workshop offering writing students a working knowledge of literary theory while exposing literature students to practical techniques from poetry, fiction, and nonfiction to refresh their writing of theoretical nonfiction texts. Discussion of student work and published work. Prerequisites: department approval.

Directed Study and Special Study

LTWR 192. Senior Seminar in Literatures in Writing (1)

The Senior Seminar Program is designed to allow senior undergraduates to meet with faculty members in a small group setting to explore an intellectual topic in literature (at the upper-division level). Senior Seminars may be offered in all campus departments. Topics will vary from quarter to quarter. Senior Seminars may be taken for credit up to four times, with a change in topic, and permission of the department. Enrollment is limited to twenty students, with preference given to seniors. Prerequisites: department stamp and/or consent of instructor.

LTWR 195. Apprentice Teaching (4)

Undergraduate instruction assistance. Students will 1) assist TA in editing students’ writing for LTWR 8A and 8C during class and outside of class; and 2) prepare a paper and report for the professor at the end of the quarter. Prerequisites: LTWR 144.

LTWR 196. Honors Thesis (4)

Senior thesis research and writing for students who have been accepted for the Literature Honors Program and who have completed LTWL 191. Oral exam. Prerequisites: department approval.

LTWR 198. Directed Group Study (2 or 4)

Directed group study in areas of writing not normally covered in courses. (P/NP grades only.) Repeatable for credit when areas of study vary.

LTWR 199. Special Studies (2 or 4)

Tutorial; individual guidance in areas of writing not normally covered in courses. (P/NP grades only.) May be taken for credit three times. Prerequisites: upper-division standing and department approval.

Graduate

Prerequisites: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

LTWR 200. Fiction Workshop (4)

A weekly meeting between a faculty member, guest fictions writers, and a small group of MFA students for focused discussion of new student writing produced during the time of the workshop. The workshop guides students toward beginning the full-length manuscript that will constitute their MFA project. Prerequisites: department approval.

LTWR 202. Poetry Workshop (4)

A weekly meeting between a single faculty member, occasional guest poets, and a small group of MFA students engaged in a discussion of new student work produced during the time of the workshop. There will be assigned readings and some writing exercises to give the course focus. Prerequisites: department approval.

LTWR 215. Cross-Genre Workshop (4)

In the generative workshop, writers create intergenre works and practice unconventional workshopping techniques that function less as editorial roundtables and more as discussions of the relationships between aesthetics and culture. Prerequisites: department approval.

LTWR 260. Autoethnographies of Literacy (4)

Designed for public school teachers, this writing seminar concerns ethnographic and autoethnographic studies of “literates” and “illiterates” in the United States.

LTWR 272. Research in Composing and Writing Discourse (4)

This course will survey current research on composing and written discourse. It will also explore various problems and issues in designing research studies.

LTWR 282. Writing States (4)

This course will be a cross-genre writing workshop where graduate students in literature with some experience in creative writing can work with other writers and broaden their own practices. The seminar will read selected texts that spur specific writing assignments. Students who already have a new or ongoing writing project can workshop that as an alternative to doing assignments. The group will critique one another’s efforts, each participant creating a twenty-page manuscript. Also at the end of the quarter the students will collectively agree on a project—a reading, performance, video, or publishing project that will document the workshop.

LTWR 295. MFA Thesis (1–12)

Research for master’s thesis. Offered for repeated registration. Open only to MFA students. Prerequisites: department approval.

LTWR 298. Directed Studies: Writing Course (1–12)

This course may be designed according to an individual student’s needs when seminar offerings do not cover subjects, genres, or authors of interest. May be applied toward the guided research or graduate seminar in literature requirement of the MFA program. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisites: department approval.