History

[ undergraduate program | graduate program | faculty ]

All courses, faculty listings, and curricular and degree requirements described herein are subject to change or deletion without notice. Updates may be found on the Academic Senate website: http://senate.ucsd.edu/catalog-copy/approved-updates/.

Courses

For course descriptions not found in the UC San Diego General Catalog, 2014–15, please contact the department for more information.

+ Courses that focus on the period before 1800.

Lower Division

HILD 2A-B-C. United States (4-4-4)

A year-long lower-division course that will provide students with a background in United States history from colonial times to the present, concentrating on social, economic, and political developments. (Satisfies Muir College humanities requirement and American History and Institutions requirement.)

HILD 7A-B-C. Race and Ethnicity in the United States (4-4-4)

Lectures and discussions surveying the topics of race, slavery, demographic patterns, ethnic variety, rural and urban life in the U.S.A., with special focus on European, Asian, and Mexican immigration.

HILD 7A. Race and Ethnicity in the United States (4)

A lecture-discussion course on the comparative ethnic history of the United States. Of central concern will be the African American, slavery, race, oppression, mass migrations, ethnicity, city life in industrial America, and power and protest in modern America.

HILD 7B. Race and Ethnicity in the United States (4)

A lecture-discussion course on the comparative ethnic history of the United States. Of central concern will be the Asian-American and white ethnic groups, race, oppression, mass migrations, ethnicity, city life in industrial America, and power and protest in modern America.

HILD 7C. Race and Ethnicity in the United States (4)

A lecture-discussion course on the comparative ethnic history of the United States. Of central concern will be the Mexican-American, race, oppression, mass migrations, ethnicity, city life in industrial America, and power and protest in modern America.

HILD 10-11-12. East Asia (4-4-4)

A lower-division survey that compares and contrasts the development of China and Japan from ancient times to the present. Themes include the nature of traditional East Asian society and culture, East Asian responses to political and economic challenges posed by an industrialized West, and war, revolution and modernization in the twentieth century.

HILD 10. East Asia: The Great Tradition (4)

The evolution of East Asian civilization from the first writing through classical Hei’an Japan and late imperial Song China. Primary and secondary readings on basic ideas, institutions and practices of the Confucian, Daoist, and Buddhist paths and of the state and family.

HILD 11. East Asia and the West, 1279–1911 (4)

From the Mongol conquests to China’s last dynasty and Japan’s annexation of Korea, this course examines political, institutional, and cultural ruptures and continuities as the East Asian countries responded to the challenges of Western imperialism with defense, reform, conservative reaction and creative imitation.

HILD 12. Twentieth-Century East Asia (4)

Examines the emergence of a regionally dominant Japan before and after World War II; the process of revolution and state-building in China during the Nationalist and Communist eras; and Korea’s encounter with colonialism, nationalism, war, revolution and industrialization.

HILD 14. Film and History in Latin America (4)

Students watch films on Latin America and compare them to historical research on similar episodes or issues. Films will vary each year but will focus on the social and psychological consequences of colonialism, forced labor, religious beliefs, and “Modernization.”

HILD 30. History of Public Health (4)

Explores the history of public health, from the plague hospitals of Renaissance Italy to the current and future prospects for global health initiatives, emphasizing the complex biological, cultural, and social dimensions of health, sickness, and medicine across time and space.

Upper Division

Unless otherwise noted, these courses are open to students with upper-division standing and to any student who has taken one quarter of any HILD course or articulated equivalent, or one quarter of a college writing course, including HUM 1–5; MCWP 40, 41, 50, or 125; DOC 1–3; WCWP 10A or 10B; MMW 11–15, 21, or 22; or CAT 1–3. Check with the department to see which courses are available each quarter.

AFRICA

Lecture Courses

HIAF 111. Modern Africa since 1880 (4)

A survey of African history dealing with the European scramble for territory, primary resistance movements, the rise of nationalism and the response of metropolitan powers, the transfer of power, self-rule and military coups, and the quest for identity and unity.

HIAF 112. West Africa since 1880 (4)

West Africa from the nineteenth century onwards and examines the broad outlines of historical developments in the sub-region through the twentieth century, including such themes as religious, political, and social changes.

HIAF 113. Small Wars and the Global Order: Africa and Asia (4)

Examines the traumas, interrelation, and global repercussions of national conflicts (‘small wars’) in the postcolonial world. Focus on Africa and Asia from the Cold War to the present with particular attention to the intersection of foreign interests, insurgency, and geopolitics.

HIAF 120. History of South Africa (4)

The origins and the interaction between the peoples of South Africa. Special attention will be devoted to industrial development, urbanization, African and Afrikaner nationalism, and the origin and development of apartheid and its consequences.

HIAF 122. Traditional African Religions (4)

A study of the meaning, structure, and sources of African traditional religion. The course examines the attitudes of mind and belief and practices that have evolved in many societies in Africa.

HIAF 123. West Africa from Earliest Times to 1800 (4)

Plant and animal domestication, ironworking and the distribution of ethnic/language groups, urbanization, regional and long-distance commerce, and the rise of medieval kingdoms. +

HIAF 130. African Society and the Slave Trade (4)

Topics include trans-Saharan trade, slavery within African societies, Atlantic slave trade, East African slave trade, problems of numbers exported and profitability, impact of slave trade on African societies, and the abolition of the slave trade.

Colloquia

The following courses are available to both undergraduate and graduate students. Undergraduates must receive a departmental stamp or consent of the instructor to register for the course. Requirements for each course will differ for undergraduate, MA, and PhD students.

HIAF 199. Independent Study in African History (4)

Directed readings for undergraduates. Prerequisites: consent of instructor and academic adviser required.

EAST ASIA

Lecture Courses

HIEA 111. Japan: Twelfth to Mid-Nineteenth Centuries (4)

Covers important political issues—such as the medieval decentralization of state power, unification in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, the Tokugawa system of rule, and conflicts between rulers and ruled—while examining long-term changes in economy, society, and culture. +

HIEA 112. Japan: From the Mid-Nineteenth Century through the US Occupation (4)

Topics include the Meiji Restoration, nationalism, industrialization, imperialism, Taisho Democracy, and the Occupation. Special attention will be given to the costs as well as benefits of “modernization” and the relations between dominant and subordinated cultures and groups within Japan.

HIEA 113. The Fifteen-Year War in Asia and the Pacific (4)

Lecture-discussion course approaching the 1931–1945 war through various “local,” rather than simply national, experiences. Perspectives examined include those of marginalized groups within Japan, Japanese Americans, Pacific Islanders, and other elites and nonelites in Asian and Pacific settings.

HIEA 114. Postwar Japan (4)

Examines social, cultural, political, and economic transformations and continuities in Japan since World War II. Emphases will differ by instructor.

HIEA 115. Social and Cultural History of Twentieth-Century Japan (4)

Japanese culture and society changed dramatically during the twentieth century. This course will focus on the transformation of cultural codes into what we know as “Japanese,” the politics of culture, and the interaction between individuals and society.

HIEA 116. Japan-U.S. Relations (4)

Survey of relations between Japan and the United States in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Although the focus will be on these nation-states, the course will be framed within the global transformation of societies. Topics include cultural frameworks, political and economic changes, colonialism and imperialism, and migration.

HIEA 117. Ghosts in Japan (4)

By examining the roles of ghosts in Japanese belief systems in a nonscientific age, this course addresses topics including folk beliefs and ghost stories, religiosity, early science, tools of amelioration and authoritative knowledge, and the relationship between myth and history.

HIEA 120. Classical Chinese Philosophy and Culture (4)

The relation of social, political, and economic developments to the philosophical and religious traditions of China c. 1200 BC to 400 AD, including Confucianism, Daoism, Legalism, correlative cosmology, and ideas about fate, spirits, and health. Previous course work on China helpful but not required. +

HIEA 121. Medieval Chinese Culture and Society (4)

This course covers the period from the sixth century to the thirteenth century, the time of the glorious T’angand Sung dynasties. We focus on the “medieval revolution” that changed the political, economic, and social life of the empire. As much as possible, we study these changes from the eyes of the people who lived throughout them—aristocrats, peasants, soldiers, merchants, women.  

HIEA 122. Late Imperial Chinese Culture and Society (4)

Using primary and secondary sources, we survey the interactions of ideas and institutions in the commercial economy of China from the tenth through the eighteenth centuries, and consider their impact on the lives of individuals. Previous course work on China helpful but not required. +

HIEA 123. China in the Ming Period (1368–1644) (4)

Narrates the history of the Ming dynasty. Explores the worldview and experiences of Ming men and women from the emperor and scholar-officials down to farmers and riff-raff, through translated primary and accessible secondary sources on politics, religion, family, economy, etc. Recommended preparation: HILD 11. + 

HIEA 125. Women and Gender in East Asia (4)

The impact of modern transformations on female roles and gender relations in China, Japan, and Korea, focusing on the late imperial/early modern periods through the twentieth century.

HIEA 126. The Silk Road in Chinese and Japanese History (4)

This course studies the peoples, cultures, religions, economics, arts, and technologies of the trade routes known collectively as the Silk Road from c. 200 BCE to 1000 CE. We will use an interdisciplinary approach. Primary sources will include written texts and visual materials. We will examine these trade routes as an early example of globalization. +

HIEA 128. History of Material Culture in China (4)

Introduction to material culture in China from a historical perspective. Consider Chinese primary sources (including both historical texts and objects) from the point of view of the new interdisciplinary field of material culture studies. +

HIEA 129. Faces of the Chinese Past (4)

Through the biographies and autobiographies of prominent and ordinary men and women from antiquity to today, this course explores the relation of the individual to social structures, class and gender in personal experience, and the production of primary and secondary sources. +

HIEA 130. End of the Chinese Empire, 1800–1911 (4)

From the Opium War to the 1911 Revolution. Key topics include ethnic identity under Manchu rule, the impact of Western imperialism, the Taiping and other rebellions, overseas Chinese, social change and currents of reform, and the rise of Chinese nationalism.

HIEA 131. China in War and Revolution, 1911–1949 (4)

An exploration of the formative period of the twentieth-century Chinese Revolution: the New Culture Movement, modern urban culture, the nature of Nationalist (Guomindang) rule, war with Japan, revolutionary nationalism, and the Chinese Communist rise to power.

HIEA 132. History of the People’s Republic of China (4)

This course analyzes the history of the PRC from 1949 to the present. Special emphasis is placed on the problem of postrevolutionary institutionalization, the role of ideology, the tension between city and countryside, Maoism, the Great Leap Forward, the Cultural Revolution.

HIEA 133. Twentieth-Century China: Cultural History (4)

This course looks at how the historical problems of twentieth-century China are treated in the popular and elite cultures of the Nationalist and Communist eras. Special emphasis is placed on film and fiction.

HIEA 134. History of Thought and Religion in China: Confucianism (4)

Course will take up one of the main traditions of Chinese thought or religion , Confucianism, and trace it from its origins to the present. The course will explain the system of thought and trace it as it changes through history and within human lives and institutions. +

HIEA 135. History of Thought and Religion in China: Buddhism (4)

Course will take up one of the main traditions of Chinese thought or religion, Buddhism, and trace it from its origins to the present. The course will explain the system of thought and trace it as it changes through history and within human lives and institutions. +

HIEA 136. History of Thought and Religion in China: Daoism (4)

Course will take up one of the main traditions of Chinese thought or religion, Daoism, and trace it from its origins to the present. The course will explain the system of thought and trace it as it changes through history and within human lives and institutions. +

HIEA 137. Women and the Family in Chinese History (4)

The course explores the institutions of family and marriage, and women’s roles and experiences within the family and beyond, from classical times to the early twentieth century. +

HIEA 138. Women and the Chinese Revolution (4)

Examines women’s roles and experiences in the twentieth-century Chinese revolution, the ways in which women participated in the process of historical change, the question of to what extent the revolution “liberated” women from “Confucian tradition.”

HIEA 144. Topics in East Asian History (4)

Selected topics in East Asian History. Course may be taken for credit up to three times as topics vary.

HIEA 150. Modern Korea, 1800–1945 (4)

This course examines Korea’s entrance into the modern world.  It utilizes both textual and audio-visual materials to explore local engagements with global phenomenon, such as imperialism, nationalism, capitalism, and socialism.  HILD 10, 11, and/or 12 recommended.

HIEA 151. The Two Koreas, 1945–Present (4)

This course traces the peninsula’s division into two rival regimes.  It utilizes both textual and audio-visual materials to reveal the varied experiences of North and South Koreans with authoritarianism, industrialization, and globalization. HILD 10, 11, and/or 12 recommended.

HIEA 152. History and Cultures of the Korean Diaspora (4)

This course places the Korean diaspora in national, regional, and global frames from the imperial age to our globalized present. It traces migrant experiences and community formations on the peninsula and in Japan, the U.S., China, and the former USSR.

HIEA 153. Social and Cultural History of Twentieth-Century Korea (4)

This course explores the cultural and social structures that dominated twentieth-century Korea: imperialism, ethnonationalism, heteropatriarchy, capitalism, socialism, and militarism. It also uses individual and collective engagements with these hegemonic structures to demonstrate contentious interactions between individuals and society.

Colloquia

The following courses are available to both undergraduate and graduate students. Undergraduates must receive a departmental stamp or consent of the instructor to register for the course. Requirements for each course will differ for undergraduate, MA, and PhD students.

HIEA 163/263. Cinema and Society in Twentieth-Century China (4)

This colloquium will explore the relationship between cinema and society in twentieth-century China. The emphasis will be on the social, political, and cultural impact of filmmaking. The specific period under examination (1930s, 1940s, post-1949) may vary each quarter. Graduate students will be expected to submit an additional paper. Prerequisites: upper-division or graduate standing and department stamp.

HIEA 164/264. Seminar in Late Imperial Chinese History (4)

Pairs primary sources with scholarship built on them to illuminate later imperial state, society, and individual lives, and to show how historians generate and answer questions. Topics vary; may be repeated for credit. Graduate students will be expected to submit an additional paper or project. Prerequisites: upper-division or graduate standing and department stamp. +

HIEA 166/266. Creating Ming Histories (4)

The Ming (1368–1644) is often considered expanding Europe’s opposite: absolutist, closed, and stagnant. Reading new scholarship in conjunction with its primary sources, we’ll explore the period’s dynamic politics and competitive society, and the production of historical knowledge. Graduate students will be required to submit an additional paper. Prerequisites: upper-division or graduate standing and department stamp.

HIEA 167/267. Special Topics in Modern Chinese History (4)

This seminar examines various domestic and international issues in Chinese history from 1800 to recent times. When topics vary, may be repeated for credit. Graduate students will be required to submit a more substantial piece of work or an additional paper. Prerequisites: upper-division or graduate standing and department stamp.

HIEA 168/268. Topics in Classical and Medieval Chinese History (4)

Chinese society, thought, religion, culture, economy and politics from the Shang through the Song dynasties, through primary and secondary sources. Topics vary; may be repeated for credit. Requirements differ for undergraduate, MA and PhD students. Graduate students will be required to submit a more substantial piece of work or an additional paper. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor and department stamp. +

HIEA 171/271. Society and Culture in Premodern China (4)

Explores premodern Chinese society and culture through the reading and discussion of classics and masterpieces in history. Examines how values and ideas were represented in the texts and how they differed, developed, or shifted over time. Requirements will vary for undergraduate, MA, and PhD students. Graduate students are required to submit an additional paper. Prerequisites: upper-division or graduate standing, department stamp. +

HIEA 180. Topics in Modern Korean History (4)

This colloquium will examine selected topics in modern Korean history through both primary sources (in translation) and secondary sources. Topics will vary year to year. Prerequisites: upper-division standing and departmental stamp.

HIEA 199. Independent Study in East Asian History (4)

Directed reading for undergraduates under the supervision of various faculty members. Prerequisites: consent of instructor required.

EUROPE

See “History of Science” for more European courses (HISC 101ABC, HISC 106).

Lecture Courses

HIEU 101. Greece in the Classical Age (4)

The social, political, and cultural history of the ancient Greek world from the Persian Wars to the death of Alexander the Great (480–323 BC). +

HIEU 101A. Ancient Greek Civilization (4)

The social, political, and cultural history of the ancient Greek world from the earliest settlements to the empire of Alexander the Great (c. 2000–323 BC). +

HIEU 102. Roman History (4)

This course treats the history of Rome from the foundation of the city in the eighth century BC until the end of the Flavian dynasty in 96 AD. It focuses particularly on the political, social, and cultural elements that fueled Roman development and expansion.

HIEU 103. Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (4)

This course discusses the history of imperial Rome and its successor states between the second and seventh centuries AD. It considers whether the Roman Empire fell or if one should instead speak of Roman continuity amidst political and religious change.

HIEU 104. Byzantine Empire (4)

A survey course of the history of the Byzantine state from the reign of Constantine to the fall of Constantinople. This course will emphasize the importance of the Byzantine state within a larger European focus, its relationship to the emerging Arab states, its political and cultural contributions to Russia and the late medieval west. +

HIEU 104A. The Byzantine Empire, 3rd–7th centuries (4)

This course is devoted to the Early Byzantine Empire from Constantine through the challenges and transformations of the seventh century, examining the rise and triumph of Christianity, war, diplomacy, the rise of Islam, climate change, epidemic and natural disasters. Students cannot receive credit for both HIEU 104 and HIEU 104A. Recommended preparation: HIEU 105. +

HIEU 104B. The Byzantine Empire, 7th–11th centuries (4)

This course covers the Middle Byzantine Empire from the seventh to the eleventh century, examining the impact of Islam; Iconoclasm; the conversion of the Slavs and the rise of Bulgaria and Russia; religious and intellectual developments; court culture and ceremonial. Students cannot receive credit for both HIEU 104 and HIEU 104B. Recommended preparation: HIEU 104A. +

HIEU 104C. The Byzantine Empire, 11th–15th centuries (4)

This course covers the Later Byzantine Empire from the eleventh through the fifteenth century, examining the eleventh century crisis; the rise of the West and the Crusades; the Komnenian revolution; Slavic empires; the Palaiologan Renaissance; Mongols and Ottomans; the Byzantine diaspora. Students cannot receive credit for both HIEU 104 and HIEU 104C. Recommended preparation: HIEU 104A and/or HIEU 104B. +

HIEU 105. The Early Christian Church (4)

A study of the origin and development of early Christian thought, literature, and institution from the New Testament period to the Council of Chalcedon. +

HIEU 109. European Nationalism from a Historical Perspective (4)

This course will explore the history of nationalism as idea and political movement in European history, from the French Revolution to the present. +

HIEU 110. The Rise of Europe (4)

The development of European society and culture from the decline of the Roman Empire to 1050.

HIEU 112. Saints and Sinners in the Middle Ages (4)

This class examines medieval history through the lens of hagiography and biography. Such texts provide intimate views of the culture, including: family and social structures; attitudes towards the supernatural; the body, gender, and aging; peace and violence; hierarchy and dissent. +

HIEU 115. The Pursuit of the Millennium (4)

The year 2000 provokes questions about the transformation of time, culture, and society. Taking the year 1000 as a touchstone, this class examines the history of apocalyptic expectations in the Middle Ages through a close scrutiny of both texts and art. +

HIEU 116. The Greek Diaspora (4)

This course examines the history of the Greek Diaspora in Canada, South America, Australia, and Africa from 1700 to the present. Special attention is paid to the Greek migration to North America during the twentieth century.

HIEU 116A. Greece and the Balkans in the Age of Ottoman Expansion (4)

This course examines the history of Greece and the Balkans (1350–1683). Topics covered: the rise of the Ottoman Empire, conquest of the Balkans, the Ottoman system of rule, religious life, rural and urban society, law and order, and material culture. +

HIEU 116CD. Greece and the Balkans during the Twentieth Century (4)

This course examines the history of Greece and the Balkans (1914–2001). Topics covered: World War I, population exchanges, authoritarianism, modernization, World War II, civil wars, Cold War, Greek-Turkish relations. Cyprus collapse of communism, 1990s conflicts, and EU expansion. Students may not get credit for both HIEU 116C and HIEU 116CD, or HIEU 116CD and HIEU 117B.

HIEU 117A. Greece and the Balkans in the Age of Nationalism (4)

This course examines the history of Greece and the Balkans (1683–1914). Topics covered: social and economic development in the eighteenth century, nationalism, independence wars, state-nation formation, interstate relations, the Eastern Question, rural society, urbanization, emigration, and the Balkan Wars.

HIEU 117B. Greece and the Balkans during the Twentieth Century (4)

This course examines the history of Greece and the Balkans (1914–2001). Topics covered: World War I, population exchanges, authoritarianism, modernization, World War II, resistance, civil wars, Cold War, Greek-Turkish relations, Cyprus, collapse of Communism, 1990s conflicts, and EU expansion.

HIEU 118. Americanization in Europe (4)

Examines problems surrounding the transfer of American culture, values, and styles to Europe in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Topics may include: consumer society, popular culture, commercial and business practices, “McDonaldization,” political and military influence, democratization, and resistance to Americanization. Students may not receive credit for both HIEU 117S and HIEU 118.

HIEU 120. The Renaissance in Italy (4)

The social, political, and cultural transformation of late-medieval Italy from the heyday of mercantile expansion before the plague to the dissolution of the Italian state system with the French invasions of 1494. Special focus upon family, associational life and factionalism in the city, the development of the techniques of capitalist accumulation, and the spread of humanism. +

HIEU 125. Reformation Europe (4)

The intellectual and social history of the Reformation and Counter-Reformation from the French invasions to the Edict of Nantes. Emphasis is upon reform from below and above, the transformation of grass-roots spirituality into institutional control. +

HIEU 126. Age of Expansion: Europe and the World, 1400–1600 (4)

Course will begin with a survey of the major empires of the fifteenth century, concentrating on the links between them. It will then examine the entrance of Europeans on the global scene in the sixteenth century. This part of the course will examine European/ non-European encounters, focusing on perceptions, economic interaction, and institutional adaptation and will emphasize the Hispanic American, Ottoman, and Indian Ocean cases. +

HIEU 127. Sport in the Modern World (4)

This course looks at the phenomenon of sport in all of its social, cultural, political, and economic aspects. The starting point will be the emergence of modern sport in nineteenth-century Britain, but the focus will be global. Since the approach will be topical rather than chronological, students should already have a good knowledge of world history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

HIEU 128. Europe since 1945 (4)

An analysis of European history since the end of the Second World War. Focus is on political, social, economic, and cultural developments within European societies as well as on Europe’s relationship with the wider world (the Cold War, decolonization).

HIEU 129. Paris, Past and Present (4)

This course surveys the historical and cultural significance of Paris from about 1500 to the present. The focus is on interactions between political, architectural, and urban evolutions, and the changing populations of Paris in times of war, revolutions, and peace. +

HIEU 130. Europe in the Eighteenth Century (4)

A lecture-discussion course focusing on Europe from 1688 to 1789. Emphasis is on the social, cultural, and intellectual history of France, Germany, and England. Topics considered will include family life, urban and rural production and unrest, the poor, absolutism, and the Enlightenment from Voltaire to Rousseau. +

HIEU 131. The French Revolution: 1789–1814 (4)

This course examines the Revolution in France and its impact in Europe and the Caribbean. Special emphasis will be given to the origins of the Revolution, the development of political and popular radicalism and symbolism from 1789 to 1794, the role of political participants (e.g., women, sans-culottes, Robespierre), and the legacy of revolutionary wars and the Napeoleonic system on Europe. +

HIEU 132. Germany from Luther to Bismarck (4)

How Germany, from being a maze of tiny states rife with religious conflict, became a nation. Did the nations-building process lead to Nazism? +

HIEU 133. Gender in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Mediterranean (4)

This course discusses sex and gender at the end of the classical period and its development into the Middle Ages in both Eastern and Western Mediterranean. Course will examine the ways in which our medieval predecessors assigned gender traits and relationships to members of society. It will approach the topic in part through an examination of the language used about gender and in part through use of modern gender theories. +

HIEU 134. The Formation of the Russian Empire, 800–1855 (4)

State-building and imperial expansion among the peoples of the East Slavic lands of Europe and Asia from the origins of the Russian state in ninth-century Kiev, through Peter the Great’s empire up to the middle of the nineteenth century. +

HIEU 136. Social History of Crime and Criminal Justice in Europe, 1700–1914 (4)

This course investigates the social history of crime, criminal justice, and policing in Europe between approximately 1700 and 1900. The topic enables historians to investigate a variety of issues, including state-formation, gender relations, and class relations.

HIEU 136B. European Society and Social Thought, 1870–1989 (4)

A lecture and discussion course on European political and cultural development and theory from 1870–1989. Important writings will be considered both as responses to and as provocations for political and cultural change.

HIEU 137. History of Colonialism: From New Imperialism to Decolonization (4)

This course surveys the age of colonialism in the nineteenth and twentieth century. The course will focus on the debates on colonialism in the metropolis as well as on the conflicts inside the colonies. Considerable emphasis will be placed on colonialism in Africa.

HIEU 138. Imperial Spain, 1476–1808 (4)

The rise and decline of Spain’s European empire from Ferdinand and Isabella to 1700. The revival of Spain and her return to European affairs in the eighteenth century. +

HIEU 141. European Diplomatic History, 1870–1945 (4)

European imperialism, alliances, and the outbreak of the First World War. The postwar settlement and its breakdown. The advent of Hitler and the disarray of the western democracies. The Second World War and the emergence of the super powers.

HIEU 142. European Intellectual History, 1780–1870 (4)

European thought from the late Enlightenment and the French Revolution to Marx and Baudelaire, emphasizing the origins of romanticism, idealism, and positivism in England, Germany, and France.

HIEU 143. European Intellectual History, 1870–1945 (4)

A lecture-discussion course on the crisis of bourgeois culture, the redefinition of Marxist ideology, and the transformation of modern social theory. Readings will include Nietzsche, Sorel, Weber, Freud, and Musil. (This course satisfies the minor in the Humanities Program.)

HIEU 144. Topics in European History (4)

Selected topics in European history. Course may be taken for credit up to three times as topics vary.

HIEU 145. The Holocaust as Public History (4)

We will study historical accounts, memoirs, diaries, and oral histories to master the Holocaust epoch. We will contrast scholarly narratives to personal experience as different ways to learn about the past. Students will design projects for public education.

HIEU 146. Fascism, Communism, and the Crisis of Liberal Democracy: Europe 1919–1945 (4)

A consideration of the political, social, and cultural crisis that faced Western liberal democracies in the interwar period, with emphasis on the mass movements that opposed bourgeois liberalism from both the left and the right.

HIEU 147. Women and Gender in Early Modern Europe (4)

This course examines the history of European women and gender issues from about 1500 to 1700. Three major themes are covered: intellectual and cultural trends; the nature of the human body and work roles; and, spiritual beliefs, experiences, and practices. +

HIEU 148. Women and Gender from the Enlightenment to the Victorian Eras (4)

This course examines European women and gender issues from about 1700 to 1871. Major themes covered are: intellectual and cultural trends (e.g., education and politics); attitudes toward female and male bodies and work roles; and, spiritual beliefs and practices. Students may not get credit for both HIEU 148 and HIEU 148D.

HIEU 149. History of Women in Europe: 1870 to the Present (4)

This course explores the history of women across classes from 1870 to the present, with an emphasis on the variety of women’s experience and the efforts towards and obstacles to empowerment. Topics include: women and the state, science and gender, feminist movements and the evolution of women’s work.

HIEU 150. Modern British History (4)

Emphasis on changes in social structure and corresponding shifts in political power. The expansion and the end of empire. Two World Wars and the erosion of economic leadership.

HIEU 151. Spain since 1808 (4)

Social, political, cultural history of Spain since Napoleon. Features second Spanish Republic, the Civil War, Franco era, and transition to democracy.

HIEU 152. The Worst of Times: Everyday Life in Authoritarian and Dictatorial Societies (4)

Examines how ordinary citizens coped with the problems of life under Europe’s authoritarian regimes. Topics may include Nazism, fascism, and quasi-fascist societies (e.g., Franco’s Spain, Salazar’s Portugal), and communist practice from Leninism to Stalinism to the milder Titoism of Yugoslavia.

HIEU 153. Topics in Modern European History (4)

Selected topics in modern European history. Course may be taken for credit up to three times as topic vary.

HIEU 154. Modern German History: From Bismarck to Hitler (4)

An analysis of the volatile course of German history from unification to the collapse of the Nazi dictatorship. Focus is on domestic developments inside Germany as well as on their impact on European and global politics in the twentieth century.

HIEU 156. History of the Soviet Union, 1905–1991 (4)

This course explores war, revolution, development, and terror in the Soviet Union from 1905–1991.

HIEU 157. Religion and the Law in Modern European History (4)

Comparative examination of the relationship between religious commitments and legal norms in Europe from the Reformation to the present. Topics may include government sponsorship; religious expression; conflicts with secular law; religious rights as human rights; and religious and cultural politics.

HIEU 158. Why Hitler? How Auschwitz? (4)

Why did Germany in 1919 produce an Adolf Hitler; how did the Nazis take power in 1933; and why did the Third Reich last until 1945? Why did the war against the Jews become industrial and absolute?

HIEU 159. Three Centuries of Zionism, 1648–1948 (4)

For centuries the land of Israel was present in Jewish minds and hearts. Why and how did the return to Zion become a reality? Which were the vicissitudes of Jewish life in Palestine?

Colloquia

The following courses are available to both undergraduate and graduate students. Undergraduates must receive a departmental stamp or permission from the instructor to register for the course. Requirements for each course will differ for undergraduate, master’s, and doctoral students.

HIEU 161/261. Topics in Roman History (4)

Selected topics in Roman history. May be taken for credit three times as topics will vary. Prerequisites: upper-division and department stamp.

HIEU 162. Topics in Byzantine History (4)

Selected topics in Byzantine history. May be taken for credit three times as topics vary. Prerequisites: upper-division and department stamp.

HIEU 163/263. Special Topics in Medieval History (4)

Intensive study of special problems or periods in the history of medieval Europe. Topics vary from year to year, and students may therefore repeat the course for credit. Prerequisites: background in European history and upper-division standing. +

HIEU 171/271. Special Topics in Twentieth-Century Europe (4)

This course alternates with HIEU 170. Topics will vary from year to year. Prerequisites: background in European history.

HIEU 172/272. Comparative European Fascism (4)

This course will be a comparative and thematic examination of the fascist movement and regimes in Europe from the 1920s to the 1940s. In particular, it will focus on the emergence of the two major fascist movements in Italy and Germany. Graduate students will be required to submit a more substantial piece of work with in-depth analysis and with an increased number of sources cited. A typical undergraduate paper would be ten pages, whereas a typical graduate paper would require engagement with primary sources, more extensive reading of secondary material, and be about twenty pages. Prerequisites: upper-division or graduate standing and departmental stamp.

HIEU 174/274. The Holocaust: A Psychological Approach (4)

An examination of how traditional moral concerns and human compassion came to be abandoned and how the mass murder of the Jews was organized and carried out. The focus of this course will be on the perpetrators. Requirements will vary for undergraduate MA and PhD students. Graduate students are required to submit a more substantial piece of work. Prerequisites: upper-division or consent of instructor. Department stamp required.

HIEU 176/276. Politics in the Jewish Past (4)

This seminar addresses Jewish civic autonomy in the late medieval era, the terms of emancipation in the European states, the politics of Jewish socialists, the costs of assimilation, and the consequences of a successful Zionist state in 1948. Graduate students will be required to submit a more substantial piece of work with in-depth analysis and with an increased number of sources cited. A typical undergraduate paper would be ten pages, whereas a typical graduate paper would require engagement with primary sources, more extensive reading of secondary material, and be about twenty pages. Prerequisites: upper-division or graduate standing and departmental stamp.

HIEU 178/278. Soviet History (4)

Topics will vary from year to year. Graduate students are required to submit a more substantial paper. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.

HIEU 181/281. Immigration, Ethnicity, and Identity in Contemporary European Society. (4)

Comparative study of immigration and migration in Europe since 1945. Topics include (im)migrant adaptation, assimilation, and identity; labor systems, opposition to and regulation of migration; competing concepts of nationality and citizenship, conflicts over Muslim immigration; and implications for European integration. Students may not receive credit for both HIEU 181/281 and ERC 101. Graduate students will be expected to submit an additional paper. Prerequisites: upper-division or graduate standing and department stamp.

HIEU 182/282. The Muslim Experience in Contemporary European Society (4)

Comparative study of Islam in Europe since 1945. Topics include: indigenous populations; immigration; Islamic law/church-state questions; EU expansion/integration; gender issues; terrorism; Islamophobia; “Europeanizing” Islam; the historical tradition of European-Muslim encounter and its present political/cultural issues. Graduate students will be required to do an additional paper. Prerequisites: upper-division or graduate standing and department stamp.

HIEU 183/283. Social History and Anthropology of the Mediterranean (4)

This seminar examines the social history and anthropology of the Mediterranean. Topics covered are: the Mediterranean debate, rural economy, peasant society, gender relations, honor and shame, rural violence, class formation, and emigration. The seminar introduces the methodology of historical anthropology. Graduate students will be expected to complete an additional paper or project. Prerequisites: upper-division or graduate standing and department stamp.

HIEU 184/284. Yugoslavia: Before, During, and After (4)

Examines the multi-ethnic Yugoslav states that existed from 1918 until the 1990s. Topics include inter-ethnic relations, foreign affairs, Tito’s revisionist communism, the consumerist Yugoslav Dream, culture and society, the violent break-up of the 1990s, and the post-Yugoslav order. Graduate students will be required to submit an additional paper. Prerequisites: upper-division or graduate standing and department stamp.

HIEU 198. Directed Group Study (1, 2, 3, 4)

Directed group study on European history under the supervision of a member of the faculty on a topic not generally included in the regular curriculum. Students must make arrangements with individual faculty members. Prerequisites: upper-division standing, completion of at least ninety units of UC San Diego undergraduate study, a minimum UC San Diego G.P.A. of 2.95, a completed and approved Special Studies form, and department stamp.

HIEU 199. Independent Study in European History (4)

Directed readings for undergraduates under the supervision of various faculty members. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.

Latin America

Lecture Courses

HILA 100. Latin America—Colonial Transformations (4)

Lecture-discussion survey of Latin America from the pre-Columbian era to 1825. It addresses such issues as the nature of indigenous cultures, the implanting of colonial institutions, native resistance and adaptations, late colonial growth and the onset of independence. +

HILA 101. Latin America: The Construction of Independence 1810–1898 (4)

Lecture-discussion survey of Latin America in the nineteenth century. It addresses such issues as the collapse of colonial practices in the society and economy as well as the creation of national governments, political instability, disparities among regions within particular countries, and of economies oriented toward the export of goods to Europe and the United States.

HILA 102. Latin America in the Twentieth Century (4)

This course surveys the history of the region by focusing on two interrelated phenomena: the absence of democracy in most nations and the region’s economic dependence on more advanced countries, especially the United States. Among the topics discussed will be the Mexican Revolution, the military in politics, labor movements, the wars in Central America, liberation theology, and the current debt crisis.

HILA 103. Revolution in Modern Latin America (4)

A political, economic, and social examination of the causes and consequences of the Mexican, Cuban, and Nicaraguan revolutions. Also examine guerrilla movements that failed to gain power in their respective countries, namely the Shining Path in Peru, FARC in Colombia, and the Zapatistas in Mexico.

HILA 106. Changes and Continuities in Latin American History (4)

Reviews the historical processes Latin American countries underwent after political independence from Spain/Portugal in the nineteenth century. Each country built its future, but there also were continuities. Assessing changes and continuities and their present-day consequences will be our goal.

HILA 110. Lord and Peasant in Latin America (4)

Examination of the historical roots of population problems, social conflict, and revolution in Latin America, with emphasis on man-land relationships. Special emphasis on modern reform efforts and on Mexico, Cuba, Brazil, and Argentina. Lecture, discussion, reading, and films.

HILA 112. Economic and Social History of the Andean Region (4)

Study of the economic and social problems of the Andean region from the colonial period until the crisis of 1912, with special attention to theoretical models to explain the processes of change.

HILA 114. Dictatorships in Latin America (4)

How did dictatorships come about? Who were the authoritarian leaders? How did they organize their regimes and what were the consequences? Recent publications on dictators in Latin America allow for comparisons across countries and throughout time to answer those questions.

HILA 115. The Latin American City, a History (4)

A survey of the development of urban forms of Latin America and of the role that cities played in the region as administrative and economic centers. After a brief survey of pre-Columbian centers, the lectures will trace the development of cities as outposts of the Iberian empires and as “city-states” that formed the nuclei of new nations after 1810. The course concentrates primarily on the cities of South America, but some references will be made to Mexico City. It ends with a discussion of modern social ills and Third World urbanization. Lima, Santiago de Chile, Buenos Aires, Rio de Janeiro, and Sao Paulo are its principal examples.

HILA 116. El Salvador and the United States: Human Rights and Revolution (4)

From coffee boom through rebellion, militarization, revolution, state terrorism, and migration, the U.S. has loomed large in the history of El Salvador. This course explores this relationship from 1920 to the present through the prisms of revolution and human rights.

HILA 117. Indians, Blacks, and Whites: Family Relations in Latin America (4)

The development of family structures and relations among different ethnic groups. State and economy define and are defined by family relations. Thus this family approach also provides an understanding to broader socioeconomic processes and cultural issues.

HILA 120. History of Argentina (4)

A survey from the colonial period to the present, with an emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Among the topics covered: the expansion of the frontier, the creation of a cosmopolitan, predominately European culture, and the failure of industrialization to provide an economic basis for democracy.

HILA 121. History of Brazil (4)

From colonial times to the present, with an emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Among the topics covered: the evolution of a slave-based economy, the key differences among regions, the military in politics, and the creation of the most populous and industrialized country in Latin America.

HILA 121A. History of Brazil, 1808 to 1904 (4)

This course will discuss transformations in Brazilian society from 1808 to 1904, covering the Independence, the Empire, end of slavery, beginning of a Republican system, modernization, social protests, popular culture, nation building, and changes in the politics of social dominance.

HILA 121B. History of Brazil, 1889 to Present (4)

This course examines factors that shed light on Brazil's label as a rising nation. In part, we will cover Brazil's two dictatorships, labor struggles, racial issues, immigration from Asia and Europe, environmental concerns, and emergence as economic and political powerhouse.

HILA 122. Cuba: From Colony to Socialist Republic (4)

A lecture-discussion course on the historical roots of revolutionary Cuba, with special emphasis on the impact of the United States on the island’s development and society.

HILA 123. The Incas and Their Ancestors (4)

The Incas called their realm Tahuantinsuyu (Land of the Four Quarters). But the Incas were only one of the many ethnic groups in the Andean region. Many different other groups became a part of the Tahuantinsuyu in the wake of Inca expansion. Over the past decade, new and fascinating information on these processes have been published, and allow for a rereading of Inca history between 900 and 1535.

HILA 124. The History of Chile 1880–Present (4)

The course surveys Chile’s basic developments beginning with the era of nitrate exports. Students will have the opportunity to address a specific issue of his or her own choosing and develop the topic for class presentation and a final paper. The course will cover politics, cultural changes, class struggles, Allende’s revolutionary movement, and Pinochet’s dictatorship to the present.

HILA 124A. History of Women and Gender in Latin America (4)

A broad historical overview of Hispanic-American women’s history focusing on issues of gender, sexuality, and the family as they relate to women, as well as the historiographical issues in Latin American and Chicana women’s history.

HILA 126. From Columbus to Castro: Caribbean Culture and Society (4)

Exploration of the relationships between socioeconomic and cultural development in Caribbean history; slavery and empire; nationalism and migration; vodun and Rastafarianism, and the literary arts.

HILA 131. A History of Mexico (4)

A century of Mexican history, 1821–1924: the quest for political unity and economic solvency, the forging of a nationality, the Gilded Age and aftermath, the ambivalent Revolution of Zapata and his enemies.

HILA 132. A History of Contemporary Mexico (4)

The paradox of a conservative state as heir to a legendary social upheaval, with special emphasis on the mural art renaissance, the school crusade, the economic dilemma, and the failure to eradicate poverty and inequality. Lectures and discussion.

HILA 134. Indians of Colonial Latin America (4)

This course surveys the history of the native peoples of Mexico and the Andes from Iberian contact to the late colonial period (1492–1800). It focuses on changes and continuities in postconquest society, exploring topics such as gender, sexuality, and resistance.  

HILA 144. Topics in Latin American History (4)

Selected topics in Latin American history. Course may be taken for credit up to three times as topics vary (the course subtitle will be different for each distinct topic). Students who repeat the same topic in HILA 144 will have the duplicate credit removed from their academic record.

Colloquia

The following courses are available to both undergraduate and graduate students. Undergraduates must receive a departmental stamp or consent of the instructor to register for the course. Requirements for each course will differ for undergraduate, MA, and PhD students.

HILA 162/262. Special Topics in Latin American History (4)

Topics will vary from year to year or quarter to quarter. May be repeated for an infinite number of times due to the nature of the content of the course always changing. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.

HILA 163/263. The History of Chile 1880–Present (4)

The course surveys Chile’s basic developments beginning with the era of nitrate exports. Students will have the opportunity to address a specific issue of his/her own choosing and develop the topic for class presentation and a final paper. Graduate students are expected to submit a more substantial piece of work. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.

HILA 167/267. Scholarship on Latin American History in the Colonial Period (4)

Introduction to the historiography on Latin America for the colonial period from Spanish and Portuguese conquests to the Wars of Independence. Requirements will vary for undergraduate, MS, and PhD students. Graduate students are required to submit an additional research paper. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor; reading knowledge of Spanish; department stamp. +

HILA 168/268. Scholarship on Latin American History in the Nineteenth Century (4)

Introduction to the historiography on Latin America for the nineteenth century: world economy, nation-state building, agrarian processes, incipient industrialization, political and cultural thought, and social structure. Requirements will vary for undergraduate, MA, and PhD students. Graduate students are required to submit an additional research paper. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor; reading knowledge of Spanish; department stamp.

HILA 169/269. Scholarship on Latin American History in the Twentieth Century (4)

Introduction to the historiography on Latin America for the twentieth century: agrarian reforms, unionization, industrialization by import substitution, the political left, social development, and international relations. Requirements will vary for undergraduate, MA, and PhD students. Graduate students are required to submit an additional research paper. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor; reading knowledge of Spanish; department stamp.

HILA 199. Independent Study in Latin American History (4)

Directed readings for undergraduates under the supervision of various faculty members. Prerequisites: consent of instructor and department stamp.

NEAR EAST

Lecture Courses

HINE 100. The Hebrew Bible and History (4)

The history and literature of ancient Israel c. 1300 to 300 BCE. Reading from the Bible, historical and archaeological surveys, and studies of authorship. +

HINE 101. The Religion of Ancient Israel (4)

Based on biblical and nonbiblical sources, a reconstruction of Israelite institutions, beliefs, and practices and their evolution over time. +

HINE 101A. History of Ancient Mesopotamia (4)

Course will trace the political and cultural history of Mesopotamia (modern Iraq), beginning with rise of cities in the fourth millennium BCE, continuing through the Sumerian, Akkadian, Assyrian, and Babylonian periods, and ending with the fall of Babylon (539 BCE). +

HINE 102. The Jews in Their Homeland in Antiquity (4)

The Jews in Israel from the sixth century BCE to the seventh century CE. Statehood, nationalism, and autonomy within the framework of the Persian empire, the Hellenistic kingdoms, and the Roman-Byzantine empire. Cultural and religious developments will be explored. +

HINE 103. The Jewish Diaspora in Antiquity (4)

The Jews outside their homeland and in pre-Islamic times, concentrating on the Greco-Roman West and the Parthian-Sasanian East. Topics include assimilation and survival; anti-Semitism and missionizing; patterns of organization and autonomy; cultural and religious developments. +

HINE 105. The Bible and the Near East: The Prophets (4)

This course covers the four books of the Latter Prophets, including Isaiah, Ezekiel, and Jeremiah, and the twelve minor prophets. It will study the social context of Israelite prophecy, cross-cultural parallels, the relationship of the prophets to other biblical literature, and the historical context in which each prophet wrote.

HINE 108. The Middle East before Islam (4)

The peoples, politics, and cultures of Southwest Asia and Egypt from the sixth century BCE to the seventh century CE. The Achemenid Empire, the Ptolemaic and Seleucid kingdoms, the Roman Orient, the Parthian and Sasanian states. +

HINE 112A. Great Stories from the Hebrew Bible (4)

A close reading of select prose narratives from the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament. +

HINE 112AL. Great Stories from the Hebrew Bible/Foreign Language (1)

Students with advanced Hebrew can study the texts in HINE 112A in the original language.

HINE 112B. Great Poems from the Hebrew Bible (4)

A close reading of select poetic passages from the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament. +

HINE 112BL. Great Poems from the Hebrew Bible/Foreign Language (1)

Students with advanced Hebrew can study the texts in HINE 112B in the original language.

HINE 113. Ancient Near East Mythology (4)

Course will analyze and compare major myths from Egypt, Israel, Ugarit, and Mesopotamia, employing a variety of modern approaches. +

HINE 114. History of the Islamic Middle East (4)

A survey of the Middle East from the rise of Islam to the region’s economic, political, and cultural integration into the West (mid-nineteenth century). Emphasis on socioeconomic and political change in the early Arab empires and the Ottoman state. +

HINE 116. The Middle East in the Age of European Empires (1798–1914) (4)

Examines the contacts of the late Ottoman Empire and Qajar Iran with Europe from the Napoleonic invasion of Egypt to World War I, the diverse facets of the relationship with the West, and the reshaping of the institutions of the Islamic states and societies.

HINE 118. The Middle East in the Twentieth Century (4)

An introduction to the history of the Middle East since 1914. Themes such as nationalism, imperialism, the oil revolution, and religious revivalism will be treated within a broad chronological and comparative framework drawing on the experience of selected countries.

HINE 119. US Mid-East Policy Post-WWII (4)

An examination of post-WWII Middle East conflicts, including the Israeli-Arab conflicts, the Lebanese Civil War, and the Gulf War of the 1980s. The roles of the superpowers and Middle Eastern states during the period.

HINE 122. Politicization of Religion in the Middle East (4)

Islamic formulations of dissent from the nineteenth century to our day; social, cultural, and political movements inflected by religion; domestic, interregional, and international dimensions with emphasis on the Arab East, Iran, and Turkey.

HINE 123. The Emergence of Middle East Nationalisms (4)

A survey of nationalism in the modern Middle East with reference to current theories of identity formation in Europe and South Asia. The course will examine shifting identities in the Ottoman Empire, its Turkish and Arab successor states, and Iran.

HINE 126. Iranian Revolution in Historical Perspective (4)

Iran’s social and political history in the twentieth century with emphasis on the Constitutional movement of the late Qajar period, formation and development of the Pahlavi state, anatomy of the 1978–79 Revolution, and a survey of the Islamic Republic.

HINE 127. History of Modern Turkey (4)

Eastern problems on the example of Turkey and with special attention to collective identities, state-society dynamics, foreign and regional policies, and varieties of modernity.

HINE 135GS. Introduction to Contemporary Israeli Society and Culture (4)

This course introduces the students to contemporary Israeli society. Among the topics explored: Israeli-Arab conflict; relations between European, Arab, Russian, and Ethiopian Jews; between secular and religious Jews; between Jews and Arabs; and between Israel and World Jewry.

HINE 136GS. Zionism and Post Zionism (4)

This course explores the evolution of Zionism from its late 19th-century origins to the present. Among the topics explored: political, cultural, spiritual and social varieties of Zionism; and the contending narratives about its nature, meaning, and accomplishments.

HINE 152A/252A. The Evolution of the Northwest Semitic Dialects (4)

Principles of historical linguistics, application to the languages of the ancient Levant. Prerequisites: knowledge of at least one Semitic language; a course in general linguistics is also desirable. +

HINE 152B/252B. Introduction to Ugaritic (4)

Decipherment of Ugaritic tablets, history, and culture of ancient Ugarit, study of Ugaritic mythic texts. +

Colloquia

The following courses are available to both undergraduate and graduate students. Undergraduates must receive a departmental stamp or consent of the instructor to register for the course. Requirements for each course will differ for undergraduate, MA, and PhD students.

HINE 161/HINE 261. Seminar in the Hebrew Bible (4)

Systematic reading and rendering of the books of the Hebrew Bible in order. Each time the class is taught, we will look at a different book. Adequate knowledge of biblical Hebrew is required. Graduate students will have to write an extra paper or exam. Prerequisites: Judaic Studies 103, graduate standing, or consent of instructor. +

HINE 162/262. Anthropology and the Hebrew Bible (4)

This course approaches the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) from the perspective of cultural anthropology. Institutions studied will include the family, rites of passage, food taboos, warfare, animism, demons, sorcery, and animal sacrifice. Formerly HINE 111; students may not receive credit for HINE 111 and HINE 162/262. Graduate students will be required to complete an extra paper. Prerequisites: upper-division or graduate standing and department stamp. +

HINE 163/263. Topics in the Ancient World (4)

Topics on the ancient world will vary from year to year. Requirements will vary for undergraduate and graduate students. Graduate students will submit a more substantial piece of work with in-depth analysis and with an increased number of sources cited. A typical undergraduate paper would be ten pages, whereas a typical graduate paper would require engagement with primary sources, more extensive reading of secondary material, and be about twenty pages. Prerequisites: upper-division or graduate standing and departmental stamp. +

HINE 166/266. Nationalism in the Middle East (4)

Growth of nationalism in relation to imperialism, religion, and revolution in the nineteenth- and twentieth-century Middle East. Emergence of cultural and political ethnic consciousness in the Ottoman state. Comparative study of Arab, Iranian, and Turkish nationalism as well as Zionism. Prerequisites: department stamp or consent of instructor.

HINE 170/270. Special Topics in Jewish History (4)

This course studies a period or theme in Jewish history. Topics will vary from year to year. Prerequisites: department stamp required.

HINE 186/286. Special Topics in Middle Eastern History (4)

Focused study of historical roots of contemporary problems in the Middle East: Islamic modernism and Islamist movements; contacts with the West; ethnic and religious minorities; role of the military; economic resources and development. Department stamp and permission of instructor.

HINE 199. Independent Study in Near Eastern History (4)

Directed readings for undergraduates under the supervision of various faculty members. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.

HISTORY OF SCIENCE

Lecture Courses

HISC 102. Technology in World History (4)

Technology as an agent of change. How have humans harnessed the power of nature? What factors have contributed to successes and failures? How has technology changed human life? How should we evaluate the quality of these changes?

HISC 103. Gender and Science in Historical Perspective (4)

History of women’s struggles and strategies for access and equality in professional science. Questions related to gender bias in science—as a social institution and as an epistemological enterprise—will be addressed in light of the historical and biographical readings.

HISC 104. History of Popular Science (4)

Historical aspects of the popularization of science. The changing relation between expert science and popular understanding. The reciprocal impact of scientific discoveries and theories, and popular conceptions of the natural world.

HISC 105. History of Environmentalism (4)

History of human effects on the natural environment, with emphasis on understanding the roles of the physical and biological sciences in providing insights into environmental processes.

HISC 106. The Scientific Revolution (4)

A cultural history of the formation of early modern science in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries: the social forms of scientific life; the construction and meaning of the new cosmologies from Copernicus to Newton; the science of politics and the politics of science; the origins of experimental practice; how Sir Isaac Newton restored law and order to the West. +

HISC 107. The Emergence of Modern Science (4)

The development of the modern conception of the sciences, and of the modern social and institutional structure of scientific activity, chiefly in Europe, during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

HISC 108. Life Sciences in the Twentieth Century (4)

The history of twentieth-century life sciences, with an emphasis on the way in which model organisms such as fruit flies, guinea pigs, bacteriophage, and zebra fish shaped the quest to unlock the secrets of heredity, evolution, and development.

HISC 110.  Historical Encounters of Science and Religion (4)

There was no such thing as a single, unchanging relationship between science and religion, and this is a course about it. Topics include the “Conflict Thesis,” natural theology, the Galileo Affair, Darwinism, the antievolution crusade, creationism, secularization, atheism, and psychoanalysis.

HISC 111. The Atomic Bomb and the Atomic Age (4)

Development of nuclear science and weapons—1930s to present—including the discovery of radioactivity and fission, the Manhattan project, the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and end of WWII, the H-bomb, and legacies of nuclear proliferation, environmental damage, and radioactive waste.

HISC 114. The Darwinian Legacy (4)

The Origin of Species by means of Natural Selection, and its scientific, intellectual, and political legacies. Topics include social Darwinism, eugenics, Nazi racial hygiene, population control, neo-Malthusianism in the modern environmental movement.

HISC 115. History of Modern Medicine (4)

Explores the origin of clinical method, the hospital, internal surgery, and the medical laboratory, as well as the historical roots of debates over health-care reform, genetic determinism, and the medicalization of society.

HISC 116. History of Bioethics (4)

The story behind the postwar rise of bioethics—medical scandals breaking in the mass media, the development of novel technologies for saving and prolonging life, the emergence of new diseases, the unprecedented scope for manipulation opened up by biology.

HISC 117. History of the Neurosciences (4)

A survey of the history of the neurosciences from the seventeenth century to the present, exploring the political, philosophical, cultural, aesthetic and ethical aspects of research into the workings of the human brain.

HISC 118. History of Sexology (4)

Analyzes the history of sexology as a series of episodes in the science of human difference, from the European reception of the first translation of the Kama Sutra in 1883 to the search for the “gay gene” in the 1990s.

HISC 120A. Technology in America I (4)

The role of technology in American history through the Civil War. Indigenous and colonial development, transportation infrastructures, and industrialization are explored to understand the connections among technology, society, and culture. +

HISC 130. Technology in the Twentieth Century (4)

Major technological developments in the twentieth century, including the rise and decline of technologies, unexpected hazards and unanticipated consequences, and why some technologies fail.

HISC 131. Science, Technology, and Law (4)

Science and law are two of the most powerful establishments of modern Western culture. Science organizes our knowledge of the world; law directs our action in it. Will explore the historical roots of the interplay between them.

HISC 144. Topics in Science Studies (4)

Selected topics in the history of science. Course can be taken for credit up to three times as topics will vary.

Colloquia

The following courses are available to both undergraduate and graduate students. Undergraduates must receive a department stamp or consent of the instructor to register for the course. Requirements for each course will differ for undergraduate, MA, and PhD students.

HISC 160/260. Historical Approaches to the Study of Science (4)

Major recent publications in the history of science will be discussed and analyzed; the topics will range in period from the seventeenth century to the twentieth, and will deal with all major branches of natural science. Special topics. Topics will vary from year to year. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.

HISC 163/263. History, Science, and Politics of Climate Change (4)

The complex historical development of human understanding of global climate change, including key scientific work, and the cultural dimensions of proof and persuasion. Special emphasis on the differential political acceptance of the scientific evidence in the U.S. and the world. Graduate students are required to submit an additional paper. Prerequisites: upper-division or graduate standing. Department stamp required.

HISC 165. Topics in Twentieth-Century Science and Culture (4)

This seminar explores topics at the interface of science, technology, and culture, from the late nineteenth century to the present. Topics change yearly; may be repeated for credit with instructor’s permission. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.

HISC 166/266. The Galileo Affair (4)

Galileo’s condemnation by the Catholic Church in 1633 is a well-known but misunderstood episode. Was Galileo punished for holding dangerous scientific views? Personal arrogance? Disobedience? Religious transgressions? Readings in original sources, recent historical interpretations. Graduate students will be expected to submit a more substantial piece of work. +

HISC 167/267. Gender and Science (4)

Why have women been traditionally excluded from science? How has this affected scientific knowledge? How have scientists constructed gendered representations not only of women, but also of science and nature? We will address these questions from perspectives including history, philosophy, and psychoanalytic theory. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.

HISC 173/273. Seminar on Darwin and Darwinisms (4)

Examines evolutionary theory before Darwin, the development of the theory of natural selection, the ongoing challenge from Lamarckism, nineteenth-century social Darwinism, the emergence of the neo-Darwinist synthesis, and the recent controversies over evolutionary psychology and creationism. Graduate students are expected to submit an additional paper. Prerequisites: upper-division or graduate standing and department stamp.

HISC 174/274. History of Localization of Brain Function (4)

From the beginnings of brain anatomy in the 1660s to the current rage for functional magnetic resonance imaging studies, this class investigates philosophical, ethical, and cultural dimensions of the quest to localize psychological phenomena in the physical brain. Graduate students are required to submit an additional paper. Prerequisites: upper-division or graduate standing and department stamp.

HISC 175/275. The Historical Sciences in the Nineteenth Century (4)

A critical analysis of the host of “historical sciences” that developed over the course of the long nineteenth century, from archaeology and paleontology to psychoanalysis and craniotomy, including the science of history itself. Graduate students will be required to submit an additional paper. Prerequisites: upper-division or graduate standing and department stamp.

HISC 177. Science and the Enlightenment (4)

In 1784, Kant asked, “What is Enlightenment?” In this course we will pursue this question, which has remained hotly debated ever since. Prerequisites: upper-division standing and department stamp.

HISC 180/280. Science and Public Policy (4)

This course will explore the evolution of the institutions, ideologies, procedures, standards, and expertise that modern democratic societies have used in applying science to generate and legitimate public policy.

HISC 199. Independent Study in the History of Science (4)

Directed readings for undergraduates under the supervision of various faculty members. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.

TOPICS

Courses

HITO 87. Special Freshman Seminar (1)

A seminar intended for exposing undergraduate students, especially freshmen, to exciting research programs conducted by department faculty. Enrollment is limited. Topic will vary quarter by quarter.

HITO 99. Independent Study on History Topics (1, 2, 3, 4)

Independent study for undergraduates with lower-division standing under the supervision of a member of the faculty on a topic not generally included in the regular curriculum. Students must make arrangements with individual faculty members. Prerequisites: lower-division standing, completion of thirty units of UC San Diego undergraduate study, a minimum UC San Diego GPA of 3.0, and a completed and approved Special Studies form.

HITO 101. Jews, Christians, and Muslims (4)

The course will explore the cultural, religious, and social relationships between the three major religious groups in the medieval Mediterranean: Muslims, Christians, and Jews from the sixth through sixteenth centuries AD.

HITO 104. The Jews and Judaism in the Ancient and Medieval Worlds (4)

The political and cultural history of the Jews through the early modern period. Life under ancient empires, Christianity and Islam. The post-biblical development of the Jewish religion and its eventual crystallization into the classical, rabbinic model. +

HITO 105. The Jews and Judaism in the Modern World (4)

Topics include the political emancipation of the Jews of Europe; the emergence of Reform, Conservative, and Modern Orthodox Judaism; Hasidism; modern anti-Semitism; Jewish socialism; Zionism; the Holocaust; the American Jewish community; the State of Israel.

HITO 107. Holocaust Video Production (4)

Students will produce creative video projects by conducting interviews and drawing from relevant texts, lectures, archival resources, and other materials to expand and deepen their understanding of the Holocaust and help contribute to the body of work documenting this period in history.

HITO 117. World History 1200–1800 (4)

This course examines the interaction between sections of the globe after 1200. It emphasizes factors operating on a transcontinental scale (disease, climate, migration) and historical/cultural phenomena that bridge distance (religion, trade, urban systems). This is not narrative history, but a study of developments that operated on a global scale and constituted the first phase of globalization. +

HITO 119/HMNR 100. Human Rights l: History and Theory (4)

Explores where human rights come from and what they mean by integrating them into a history of modern society, from the Conquest of the Americas and the origins of the Enlightenment, to the Holocaust and the contemporary human rights regime.

HITO 124. Mystical Traditions (4)

The course examines multiform mystical traditions in world religions and cultures, including Greco-Roman philosophy, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism by studying classics of mystical literature and secondary sources; also addressed are mystical beliefs and practices in contemporary society.

HITO 126. A History of Childhood (4)

This course will examine the different ways that attitudes toward children have changed throughout history. By focusing on the way that the child was understood, we will examine the changing role of the family, the role of culture in human development, and the impact of industrialization and modern institutions on the child and childhood.

HITO 133. War and Society: The Second World War (4)

An examination of the Second World War in Europe, Asia, and the United States. Focus will be on the domestic impact of the war on the belligerent countries as well as on the experiences of ordinary soldiers and civilians.

HITO 134. International Law—War Crimes and Genocide (4)

Comparative study of genocide and war crimes, stressing European developments since 1900 with reference to cases elsewhere. Topics include historical precedents; evolving legal concepts; and enforcement mechanisms. Emphasis on the Holocaust, the USSR under Stalin, ex-Yugoslavia, and the Armenian genocide. Students may not receive credit for both HITO 134 and ERC 102.

HITO 135. Historical Anthropology (4)

This course will give an interdisciplinary introduction to anthropological thought in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Secondly, it will deal with different fields of historical anthropology. Central questions and approaches will be discussed by presenting selected case studies.

HITO 140. History of Emotions (4)

An examination of the history of emotions from the early modern period to the present with a focus on Europe and North America. Analysis of different approaches to emotions as well as of specific emotions (love, honor, shame, fear, guilt).

HITO 150GS. The Scottish Enlightenment and the Founding of the United States (4)

A lecture-discussion course on the philosophical, political, and economic ideas that shaped the Scottish Enlightenment in the eighteenth century, especially the ideas of David Hume, Adam Smith, and John Witherspoon, and their impact upon the American Revolution and the Constitution of the United States.

Colloquia

The following courses are available to both undergraduate and graduate students. Undergraduates must receive a department stamp or consent of the instructor to register for the course. Requirements for each course will differ for undergraduate, MA, and PhD students.

HITO 164/264. Jews and Other Ethnics in the American Past (4)

In this course we compare the Jewish experience to other religious minorities in American history. Topics include motives and rates of immigration, education and work patterns, religious experiences, women’s roles, family life, and representations in popular and high culture.

HITO 165/265. Topics—LGBT History (4)

Topics will examine lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer identities, communities, culture, and politics. May be repeated for credit two times, provided each course is a separate topic, for a maximum of twelve units. Prerequisites: upper-division standing and department stamp.

HITO 166/266. Death Penalty Global Perspectives since 1492 (4)

From early modern witches, rebels, and heretics to hyper-modern gangsters, terrorists, and serial killers, applying capital punishment to foreign nationals and ethnic minorities has sustained a global conversation about the sanctity of human life and the meaning of citizenship in the Americas and Europe. Graduate students must complete an additional paper. Prerequisites: upper-division or graduate standing and department stamp.

HITO 168/268. The U.S. and Germany from the 1890s to the 1960s: Transitional Relations and Competing Modernities (4)

The course analyzes mutual influences and exchanges between the U.S. and Germany from the late nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century. Topics include imperialism and racism, social thought and intellectual migration, economic relations, feminism, and youth cultures, war, and occupation. Graduate students must complete an additional paper. Prerequisites: upper-division or graduate standing and department stamp.

HITO 172/272. War in the Twentieth Century: A Psychological Approach (4)

Reckoning by novelists, essayists, and biographers with the phenomenon of contemporary warfare as an unprecedented experience and an abiding threat. Graduate students are required to submit a more substantial piece of work. Prerequisites: upper-division or graduate standing and department stamp.

HITO 180/280. Housing in the Developing World (4)

The majority of the world’s citizens now live in cities; this course examines the evolution of housing architecture and finance in the twentieth-century context of rapid urbanization, dissolving empire, industrialization, and globalization. Graduate students will submit a more substantial piece of work with in-depth analysis and with an increased number of sources cited. A typical undergraduate paper would be ten pages, whereas a typical graduate paper would require engagement with primary sources, more extensive reading of secondary material, and be about twenty pages. Prerequisites: upper-division or graduate standing and consent of instructor.

HITO 192. Senior Seminar in History (1)

The Senior Seminar Program is designed to allow senior undergraduates to meet with faculty members in a small group setting to explore an intellectual topic in history (at the upper-division level). Topics will vary from quarter to quarter. Senior Seminars may be taken for credit up to four times, with a change in topic, and permission of the department. Enrollment is limited to twenty students, with preference given to seniors. Prerequisites: department stamp and/or consent of instructor.

HITO 193/POLI 194/COM GEN 194/USP 194. Research Seminar in Washington, DC (6)

Course attached to six-unit internship taken by student participating in the UCDC program. Involves weekly seminar meetings with faculty and teaching assistant and a substantial historical research paper. Prerequisites: department stamp required; participating in UCDC program.

HITO 194. History Honors (4)

A program of independent study providing candidates for history honors an opportunity to develop, in consultation with an adviser, a preliminary proposal for the honors essay. An IP grade will be awarded at the end of this quarter. A final grade will be given for both quarters at the end of HITO 195. Prerequisites: consent of instructor. Department stamp required.

HITO 195. The Honors Essay (4)

Independent study under the supervision of a faculty member leading to the preparation of an honors essay. A letter grade for both HITO 194 and 195 will be given at the completion of this quarter. Prerequisites: consent of instructor. Department stamp required.

HITO 196. Honors Seminar (4)

The nature and uses of history are explored through the study of the historian’s craft based on critical analysis of historical literature relating to selected topics of concern to all historians. Required of all candidates for history honors and open to other interested students with the instructor’s consent. Department stamp required.

HITO 198. Directed Group Study (1–4)

Directed group study on a topic not generally included in the regular curriculum. Students must make arrangements with individual faculty members. (P/NP grades only.) Prerequisites: upper-division standing, completion of at least ninety units of UC San Diego undergraduate study, a minimum G.P.A. of 2.5, and a completed and approved Special Studies form.

HITO 199. Independent Study for Undergraduates (4)

Independent study on a topic not generally included in the regular curriculum. Students must make arrangements with individual faculty members. (P/NP grades only.) Prerequisites: consent of instructor.

UNITED STATES

See “History of Science” for more US courses (HISC 105, HISC 108, HISC 111).

Lecture Courses

HIUS 100. Colonial Period to 1763 (4)

Political and social history of the thirteen colonies: European background, settlement and expansion, beginnings of culture, and the imperial context. +

HIUS 101. The American Revolution (4)

Causes and consequences of the revolution: intellectual and social change, the problems of the new nation, the Constitution, and the origins of political parties. +

HIUS 104. The Revolutionary Atlantic (4)

The upheavals that transformed the early modern Atlantic emphasizing the United States, Caribbean, and Great Britain. Topics: struggles to define democracy, the reorganization of the Atlantic state system, the Enlightenment, and international responses to the American and French Revolutions. +

HIUS 106A. American Foreign Relations, to 1900 (4)

Course examines range of public and private interactions between the United States and the world, from the founding of the republic to the Spanish-American War. Topics include origins of federal foreign policy making power, territorial and commercial and ideological expansionism.

HIUS 106B. American Foreign Relations, since 1900 (4)

Examines foreign relations of the United States from acquisition of a formal overseas empire in the aftermath of the Spanish-American War to the end of the Cold War. Topics cover a range of public and private interactions with the world.

HIUS 107. The Early Republic (4)

This course will examine the transformation of American society and politics between the American Revolution and the Jacksonian period. Topics to be considered include the emergence of domesticity, the development of political parties, the expansion of capitalist relations, the debate over slavery, the early labor movement, and the origins and motivations of middle-class reform. +

HIUS 108A/ETHN 112A. History of Native Americans in the United States I (4)

This course examines the history of the Native Americans in the United States with emphasis on the lifeways, mores, warfare, cultural adaptation, and relations with the European colonial powers and the emerging United States until 1870. +

HIUS 108B/ETHN 112B. History of Native Americans in the United States II (4)

This course examines the history of the Native Americans in the United States with emphasis on the lifeways, mores, warfare, cultural adaptation, and relations with the United States from 1870 to the present.

HIUS 109. Intellectual History: From Contact to Civil War (4)

An exploration of cultural, political, religious, and social thought in early America. Emphasis will be placed on the trans-Atlantic context and on the relationships between intellectuals and authority. +

HIUS 110. America and the World: Revolution to World War I (4)

A lecture course that explores the evolution of the interaction between the United States and the world from the American Revolution to the First World War, with particular emphasis upon the role of diplomacy, war, and economic change.

HIUS 111. America and the World: World War I to the Present (4)

A lecture course that explores the evolution of the interaction between the United States and the world from 1914 to the present, with special attention to the era of the Great Depression, the Cold War, Vietnam, and the post 9/11 war on terror.

HIUS 113. History of Mexican America (4)

This course explores the history of the largest minority population in the United States, focusing on the legacies of the Mexican War, the history of Mexican immigration and US-Mexican relations, and the struggle for citizenship and civil rights.

HIUS 114. California History (4)

This course examines California history from 1800 onward, with an emphasis on social, economic, and political change. The course will explore the effect of national and international events as well as the ways in which California–the ideal and the real–shapes the American experience.

HIUS 115. History of Sexuality in the United States (4)

Constructions of sex and sexuality in the United States from the time of precontact Native America to the present, focusing on sexual behaviors, sexual ideologies, and the uses of sexuality for social control.

HIUS 116. War and American Society (4)

The connection between social relations and America’s wars. Ways that American society has influenced decisions to prepare for or go to war as well as the impact of war on class relations and ideologies of race and gender.

HIUS 117. History of Los Angeles (4)

This course examines the history of Los Angeles from the early nineteenth century to the present. Particular issues to be addressed include urbanization, ethnicity, politics, technological change, and cultural diversification.

HIUS 118. American Jewish History (4)

This course explores the history of Jews in America from the colonial period to the present, focusing on both the development of Jewish communities primarily as a result of immigration and evolving relations between Jews and the larger American society.

HIUS 120. Peace Movements in America (4)

Topics will include Quaker origins of the American peace movements and examples of opposition to wars in the twentieth century from World Wars I and II, Vietnam, anti-nuclear movements, and intervention in Central America to Iraq.

HIUS 122. History and Hollywood: America and the Movies since the Great Depression (4)

A lecture-discussion course utilizing written texts and films to explore major themes in American politics and culture from the Great Depression through the 1990s. Topics will include the wars of America, McCarthyism, the counter-culture of the 1960s, and the transformation of race and gender relations.

HIUS 123/USP 167. History of New York City (4)

New York City breathes history. Whether it is in the music, the literature, or the architecture, the city informs our most basic conceptions of American identity. This course examines the evolution of Gotham from the colonial era to today.

HIUS 124/ETHN 125. Asian American History (4)

Explore how Asian Americans were involved in the political, economic, and cultural formation of United States society. Topics include migration; labor systems; gender, sexuality and social organization; racial ideologies and anti-Asian movements; and nationalism and debates over citizenship.

HIUS 126. The History of Race in the United States (4)

Examines key periods, events, and processes throughout the twentieth century that shaped the way Americans thought about race. Also examines the historical development of the category of race and racism, as well as how it is lived in everyday life.

HIUS 127. Gender and US Immigration (4)

This course will examine immigration to the United States and the role that gender, as a fundamental social category, shapes immigration. We focus on how gendered social structures, experiences, and networks have shaped the immigrant experience.

HIUS 128. African American Legal History (4)

This course sketches the shifting experience persons of African descent have had with the law in the United States. Films, cases, articles, and book excerpts are used to convey the complex nature of this four hundred year journey.

HIUS 129/USP 106. The History of Race and Ethnicity in American Cities (4)

This class examines the history of racial and ethnic groups in American cities. It looks at major forces of change such as immigration to cities, political empowerment, and social movements, as well as urban policies such as housing segregation.

HIUS 130. Cultural History from 1607 to 1865 (4)

This course will explore connections between American culture and the transformations of class relations, gender ideology, and political thought. Topics will include the transformations of religious perspectives and practices, republican art and architecture, artisan and working class culture, the changing place of art and artists in American society, antebellum reform movements, antislavery and proslavery thought. +

HIUS 131. Cultural History from 1865 to 1917 (4)

This course will focus on the transformation of work and leisure and the development of consumer culture. Students consider connections among culture, class, racial and gender ideologies, and politics. Topics include labor management and radicalism, organized sports, museums, commercial entertainment, world fairs, reactionary movements, and imperialism.

HIUS 132. Civil War–Reconstruction in Pop Culture (4)

This course considers how cultural processes have shaped histories of the Civil War and Reconstruction. Students will analyze the relationship between popular culture and major themes of the era through the use of literature, texts, film, television, and print.

HIUS 133. The Golden Age of Piracy (4)

This interdisciplinary lecture course focuses on the history and literature of global piracy in the English-speaking world from Sir Francis Drake to Blackbeard and how this Golden Age was remembered in the popular fiction of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. +

HIUS 134. From Be Bop to Hip Hop: African American Cultural History since 1945 (4)

Explore the politics of black culture in the postwar period. Topics include: the dynamic interplay of social factors (migration, civil rights, black power, deindustrialization, globalization) and the production of African American culture, including music, film, and literature.

HIUS 135. The Atlantic World, 1492–1803 (4)

This course focuses on the role the Atlantic played in bringing together in both volatile and beneficial ways the remarkably different cultures of four continents from the Columbian Exchange to the Haitian Revolution. Students may not receive credit for HIUS 135 and 135A or 135B. +

HIUS 136/ETHN 153. Citizenship and Civil Rights in the Twentieth Century (4)

This course traces the history of the institution of US citizenship in the last century, tracing changing notions of racial, cultural, and gender differences, the evolution of the civil rights struggle, and changes in laws governing citizenship and access to rights.

HIUS 139/ETHN 149. African American History in the Twentieth Century (4)

This course examines the transformation of African America across the expanse of the long twentieth century: imperialism, migration, urbanization, desegregation, and deindustrialization. Special emphasis will be placed on issues of culture, international relations, and urban politics.

HIUS 140/ECON 158. Economic History of the United States I (4)

The United States as a raw materials producer, as an agrarian society, and as an industrial nation. Emphasis on the logic of the growth process, the social and political tensions accompanying expansion, and nineteenth- and early twentieth-century transformations of American capitalism.

HIUS 141/ECON 159. Economic History of the United States II (4)

The United States as modern industrial nation. Emphasis on the logic of the growth process, the social and political tensions accompanying expansion, and twentieth-century transformations of American capitalism.

HIUS 142. Great Trials of the Anglo-American World (4)

Examines important constitutional, criminal, and civil trials in English and American courts from the early modern period to the present. The topics will vary from year to year.

HIUS 142A. United States in the Twentieth Century, 1900–1945 (4)

Examines the political, economic, and social history of the American people from the turn of the twentieth century to the end of World War II. Topics: progressive movement, impact of the Great Depression, and the consequences of two world wars.

HIUS 142B. United States in the Twentieth Century, 1945 to the Present (4)

Examines the political, economic and social history of the American people from the end of World War II to present. Topics: origins of the Cold War, struggle for racial justice and the rise of American conservatism since the 1980s.

HIUS 143. The Built Environment in the Twentieth Century (4)

An examination of urban and regional planning as well as piecemeal change in the built environment. Topics include urban and suburban housing, work environments, public spaces, transportation and utility infrastructures, utopianism.

HIUS 144. Topics in US History (4)

Selected topics in US history. Course may be taken for credit up to three times as topics vary. 

HIUS 145. From New Era to New Deal (4)

This course will examine the economic, social, and political changes underway in the United States from 1917 to 1945. Topics will include the 1920s, the Great Depression, the New Deal and the consequences of two World Wars. 

HIUS 146. Race, Riots, and Violence in the U.S. (4)

Examining the history of urban riots in the U.S. since the late nineteenth century. Exploring how different groups of Americans have constructed competing notions of race, gender, labor, and national belonging by participating in street violence.

HIUS 147/USP 165. History of the American Suburb (4)

This lecture explores the development of suburbs in America, from the early nineteenth century to the contemporary era. Topics include suburban formation, class, ethnic and racial dimensions, government influences, social life, and cultural responses to suburbia. The class will explore competing theories of suburbanization as it surveys the major literature.

HIUS 148/USP 103. The American City in the Twentieth Century (4)

This course focuses on the phenomenon of modern American urbanization. Case studies of individual cities will help illustrate the social, political, and environmental consequences of rapid urban expansion, as well as the ways in which urban problems have been dealt with historically.

HIUS 149. The United States in the 1960s (4)

An overview of the social and political developments that polarized American society in the tumultuous decade of the 1960s. Themes include the social impact of the postwar baby boom, the domestic and foreign policy implications of the Cold War; the evolution of the civil rights and women’s movements; and the transformation of American popular culture.

HIUS 150. American Legal History to 1865 (4)

The history of American law and legal institutions. This quarter focuses on crime and punishment in the colonial era, the emergence of theories of popular sovereignty, the forging of the Constitution and American federalism, the relationship between law and economic change, and the crisis of slavery and Union. +

HIUS 151. American Legal History since 1865 (4)

The history of American law and legal institutions. This course examines race relations and law, the rise of big business, the origins of the modern welfare state during the Great Depression, the crisis of civil liberties produced by two world wars and McCarthyism, and the Constitutional revolution wrought by the Warren Court. HIUS 150 is not a prerequisite for HIUS 151.

HIUS 152A. A Constitutional History of the United States to 1865 (4)

The historical development of constitutional thought and practice in the United States from the era of the American Revolution through the Civil War, with special attention to the role of the Supreme Court under Chief Justices Marshall and Taney.

HIUS 152B. A Constitutional History of the United States since 1865 (4)

The historical development of constitutional thought and practice in the United States since 1865, with special attention to the role of the Supreme Court from Chief Justices Chase to Rehnquist. +

HIUS 153. American Political Trials (4)

Survey of politicized criminal trials and impeachments from Colonial times to the 1880s. Examines politically motivated prosecutions and trials that became subjects of political controversy, were exploited by defendants for political purposes, or had their outcomes determined by political considerations. +

HIUS 154. Western Environmental History (4)

This course examines human interaction with the western American environment and explores the distinction between the objective environmental understanding of science and the subjective views of history and historians. The course will also analyze the most compelling environmental issues in the contemporary West.

HIUS 155. From Zoot Suits to Hip Hop: Race and Popular Culture since World War II (4)

Tracing popular cultural production and consumption in the U.S. since World War II. It historicizes popular culture as an arena where social relations are negotiated and where race, class, and gender identities are constructed, transformed, and contested.

HIUS 155A. Religion and Law in American History: Foundations to the Civil War (4)

Selected problems in the history of the relationship between religious beliefs and practice and legal institutions in the Anglo-American world. Topics include the English background, religion in the age of the American Revolution and the antebellum period. +

HIUS 155B. Religion and Law in American History: Civil War to the Present (4)

Selected problems in the history of the relationship between religious beliefs and practice and legal institutions in America from the Civil War to the present. Topics include the religion and government aid; sacred duties and the law; and religion and cultural politics.

HIUS 156. American Women, American Womanhood (4)

This course explores the emergence of a dominant ideology of womanhood in America in the early nineteenth century and contrasts the ideal with the historically diverse experience of women of different races and classes, from settlement to 1870. Topics include witchcraft, evangelicalism, cult of domesticity, sexuality, rise of industrial capitalism and the transformation of women’s work, Civil War, and the first feminist movement. +

HIUS 157. American Women, American Womanhood 1870 to Present (4)

This course explores the making of the ideology of womanhood in modern America and the diversity of American women’s experience from 1870 to the present. Topics include the suffrage movement, the struggle for reproductive rights and the ERA; immigrant and working-class women, women’s work, and labor organization; education, the modern feminist movement and the contemporary politics of reproduction, including abortion and surrogate motherhood. +

HIUS 158/ETHN 130. Social and Economic History of the Southwest I (4)

This course examines the history of the Spanish and Mexican borderlands (what became the US Southwest) from roughly 1400 to the end of the U.S.-Mexico War in 1848, focusing specifically on the area’s social, cultural, and political development. +

HIUS 159/ETHN 131. Social and Economic History of the Southwest II (4)

(Cross-listed as Ethnic Studies 131.) This course examines the history of the American Southwest from the U.S.-Mexican War in 1846–48 to the present, focusing on immigration, racial and ethnic conflict, and the growth of Chicano national identity.

Colloquia

The following courses are available to both undergraduate and graduate students. Undergraduates must receive a departmental stamp or consent of the instructor to register for the course. Requirements for each course will differ for undergraduate, MA, and PhD students.

HIUS 160/260. Colloquium on the American Empire (4)

Course explores the concept of an American Empire by examination of the literature on the topic. Particular attention will be on the work since 9/11/01. Students are expected to produce original work concerning the definition and/or existence of an American Empire. Graduate students are expected to submit an additional piece of work. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Department stamp required.

HIUS 162/262. The American West (4)

This seminar will trace major themes in the history of the American West. Topics will include ethnicity, the environment, urbanization, demographics, and shifting concepts surrounding the significance of the West. Graduate students will be required to submit additional work in order to receive graduate credit for the course. Prerequisites: department stamp required.

HIUS 166/266. Topics in Southern History (4)

Specific topics will vary from year to year, including slavery, Civil War and Reconstruction, the Afro-American experience, race relations. +

HIUS 167/267/ETHN 180. Topics in Mexican-American History (4)

This colloquium studies the racial representation of Mexican Americans in the United States from the nineteenth century to the present, examining critically the theories and methods of the humanities and social sciences. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

HIUS 169/269. Topics in American Legal and Constitutional History (4)

A reading and discussion course on topics that vary from year to year, including American federalism, the history of civil liberties, and the Supreme Court. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.

HIUS 173/273. Topics in American Women’s History (4)

The specific content of the course will vary from year to year but will always analyze in depth a limited number of issues in American women´s history. Special topics. Requirements will vary for undergraduate, MA, PhD students. Graduate students will be required to submit a more substantial piece of work. Prerequisites: consent of instructor or department stamp.

HIUS 176/276. Race and Sexual Politics (4)

This seminar will explore the histories of sexual relations, politics, and cultures that both cross and define racial boundaries in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Reading will focus on the United States as well as take up studies sited in Canada and Latin America. Graduate students are expected to submit a more substantial piece of work. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.

HIUS 178/278 The Atlantic World, 1400–1800 (4)

This course explains the origin of the Atlantic as a zone of interaction for Europeans, indigenous Americans, and Africans, and evaluates the consequences of the interaction over several centuries by exploring contests over political power and economic/demographic change. Graduate students will submit a more substantial piece of work with in-depth analysis and with an increased number of sources cited. A typical undergraduate paper would be ten pages, whereas a typical graduate paper would require engagement with primary sources, more extensive reading of secondary material, and be about twenty pages. Prerequisites: upper-division or graduate standing and departmental stamp. +

HIUS 180/ETHN 134. Immigration and Ethnicity in Modern American Society (4)

Comparative study of immigration and ethnic-group formation in the United States from 1880 to the present. Topics include immigrant adaptation, competing theories about the experiences of different ethnic groups, and the persistence of ethnic attachments in modern American society. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

HIUS 181/281. Topics in Twentieth Century United States History (4)

A colloquium dealing with special topics in US history from 1900 to the present. Themes will vary from year to year. Prerequisites: department stamp or consent of instructor.

HIUS 185/285. In the Public Interest (4)

In this seminar, we will examine the shifting boundary between what constitutes a public and a private concern in twentieth-century US history. We will consider issues such as civil rights, immigration, health care, and the regulation of financial institutions. Prerequisites: department stamp required for HIUS 185. Instructor approval required for HIUS 285.

HIUS 186. Topics in US Economic History (4)

Selected topics in US economic history.  Course may be taken for credit a total of three times, as topics vary. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.

HIUS 187/287. Topics in American Social History (4)

Colloquium on selected topics in American social history. Topics will vary from year to year, and the course may therefore be repeated for credit.

HIUS 188/288. Topics in Culture and Politics (4)

Colloquium on select topics in culture and politics in the United States. Topics will vary from quarter to quarter. Graduate students will be required to submit an additional piece of work. Prerequisites: upper-division or graduate standing and department stamp.

HIUS 199. Independent Study in United States History (4)

Directed readings for undergraduates under the supervision of various faculty members. Prerequisites: consent of instructor and department stamp required.

Graduate

Graduate standing is a prerequisite for all graduate-level courses. For more graduate courses (200+), look at history undergraduate colloquia (courses numbered 160–190).

HIGR 200. History and Theory (4)

An introductory graduate course for students in all fields. Themes include cross-field historiography and theory, interdisciplinary approaches to history and historical method. (May be taken twice for credit, if the reading list is significantly different.)

HIGR 204A-B. The History of the University (4-4)

Traces the history and idea of the university from its medieval origins, with emphasis on its post-WWII incarnation as an engine of scientific investigation, economic growth, socio-cultural analysis, and artistic experimentation. Research project will utilize original sources in UC San Diego’s archives. Students must complete both HIGR 204A and 204B in order to get credit for both. HIGR 204A focuses on the research portion of the class.

HIGR 205. Feminist Historical Studies (4)

An introduction to feminist historical studies, this course is designed for interested graduate students from all history field groups. Graduate students from other disciplines are also encouraged to participate. The course will provide students a rigorous training in women’s history, in the feminist theories that undergird that scholarship, and in the emergent field of gender analysis. The particular content of the course will change from year to year, but each course will include theoretical texts, historical case studies, and primary sources. Readings will be drawn from different times and places. This course is strongly recommended for those preparing minor fields in women’s history. The course can be repeated twice for credit.

HIGR 207. Nationalism, Colonialism, and Race (4)

A transdisciplinary and comparative course on the interplay of nationalism, colonialism, and race (as well as class and gender/sexuality) in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

HIGR 209. Historical Pedagogy (4)

An introductory graduate course for students in all field groups. The seminar introduces students to useful skills, methods, and techniques for teaching history. May be taken for credit two times. Prerequisites: department approval required.

HIGR 210. Historical Scholarship on Modern Chinese History (4)

This course will introduce students to the monographic literature and the main historiographic controversies of modern Chinese history.

HIGR 211. Historical Scholarship on Modern Japanese History (4)

This course will introduce students to the monographic literature and the main historiographic controversies of modern Japanese history.

HIGR 212. Historical Scholarship on Modern East Asian History (4)

This course will introduce students to the monographic literature and the main historiographic controversies of modern East Asian history.

HIGR 213. Sources on Modern Chinese History (4)

An introduction to Chinese documentary sources and collections on Qing and Republican history. This course will introduce students to the language of Qing documents, and to the contents and uses of imperial documents and archives, documentary collections, periodicals, gazetteers, etc.

HIGR 215A-B. Research Seminar in Modern Chinese History (4-4)

A two-quarter research seminar in Chinese history. A paper, based on original research, will be due in the second quarter. Seminar topics will vary. Reading knowledge of Chinese is expected. An IP grade will be awarded at the end of the first quarter. Final grade will not be given until the end of the second quarter. Prerequisites: 215A is a prerequisite for 215B.

HIGR 216A-B. Research Seminar in Modern Japanese History (4-4)

A two-quarter research seminar in Japanese history. A paper, based on original research, will be due in the second quarter. Seminar topics will vary. Reading knowledge of Japanese is expected. An IP grade will be awarded at the end of the first quarter. Final grade will not be given until the end of the second quarter. Prerequisites: 216A is a prerequisite for 216B.

HIGR 217A. Historical Scholarship on Premodern Chinese History: Foundations—China before Buddhism (4)

Ancient society differed dramatically from the imperial, bureaucratic, commercial, Buddhist China of later times. Yet the texts and artifacts of antiquity echoed powerfully through the centuries. We will study foundational texts, practices, and objects in their own contexts and also consider their later uses.

HIGR 217B. Historical Scholarship on Premodern Chinese History: Han Dynasty through the Song Dynasty (4)

Course introduces history and society during the Chinese Middle Ages (c. 200 BCE–1200 CE), including the Han, Six, Tang, and Song Dynasties. Examination of the birth and development of China’s great religions, Buddhism and Daoism, and the international culture of the Silk Road, and political and cultural systems that still resonate in China today.

HIGR 217C. Historical Scholarship on Premodern Chinese History: Late Imperial Chinese History, 1200–1800 (4)

Course introduces major topics in scholarship on the Yuan, Ming, and Qing periods. It is intended to prepare graduate students to teach the history of late imperial China.

HIGR 218A. Graduate Seminar in Premodern Chinese History (4)

Course subject varies among periods before 1900. 218A includes secondary scholarship studied for content, method, and structure; research methods and resources; and development of the research topic. In 218B students write an original research paper using primary sources. Prerequisites: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Reading knowledge of Chinese.

HIGR 218B. Graduate Seminar in Premodern Chinese History (4)

Course subject varies among periods before 1900. 218A includes secondary scholarship studied for content, method, and structure; research methods and resources; and development of the research topic. In 218B students write an original research paper using primary sources. Prerequisites: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Reading knowledge of Chinese. HIGR 218A.

HIGR 220. Historical Scholarship on European History, 1500–1715 (4)

Introduction to the historiography on Renaissance, Reformation, and early modern Europe: an overview of methodologies with emphasis on sources and critical approaches. Required for all beginning European history graduate students.

HIGR 221. Historical Scholarship on European History, 1715–1850 (4)

Selected topics in European history from the early modern to the modern era. Readings and discussions focus on issues of methodology and interpretation. Required for all beginning European history graduate students.

HIGR 222. Historical Scholarship on European History, since 1850 (4)

Critical evaluation of selected topics in the period of modern Europe from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Required for all beginning European history graduate students.

HIGR 225. Readings in Modern Russian History (4)

Students will read major works on revolutionary Russian and Soviet history. Attention will be paid to both classic and revisionist works.

HIGR 228. Historical Scholarship on Greece and the Balkans, 1768–1923 (4)

Critical evaluation of selected topics on Greece and the Balkans during the late Ottoman period (1768–1923). Attention will be paid to both classic and revisionist works. May be taken for credit three times.

HIGR 229. Historical Scholarship on Greece and the Balkans, 1923–2000 (4)

Critical evaluation of selected topics on Greece and the Balkans during the twentieth century. Attention will be paid to both classic and revisionist works. May be taken for credit three times.

HIGR 230A-B. Research Seminar in Early Modern Europe (4-4)

Selected topics in the period from the sixteenth century through the early nineteenth, with an emphasis on the theory and practice of socioeconomic history. An IP grade will be awarded at the end of the first quarter. Final grade will not be given until the end of the second quarter. Prerequisites: 230A is a prerequisite for 230B.

HIGR 231A-B. Research Seminar in Modern European History (4-4)

Selected topics in the period of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. An IP grade will be awarded at the end of the first quarter. Final grade will not be given until the end of the second quarter. Prerequisites: 231A is a prerequisite for 231B.

HIGR 236A-B. Research Seminar in History of Science (4-4)

A two-quarter research seminar comprising intensive study of a specific topic in the history of science. The first quarter will be devoted to readings and discussions; the second chiefly to the writing of individual research papers. Topics vary from year to year, and students may therefore repeat the course for credit. An IP grade will be awarded at the end of the first quarter. Final grade will not be given until the end of the second quarter.

HIGR 237. Topics in the History of Ocean Sciences (4)

(Cross-listed with SIO 201.) Intensive study of specific problems in the history of the ocean sciences, and of related earth and atmospheric sciences, in the modern period. Topics vary from year to year, and students may therefore repeat the course for credit.

HIGR 238. Introduction to Science Studies (4)

(Cross-listed as Communication 225A, Philosophy 209A, and Sociology 255A.) Study and discussion of classic work in history of science, sociology of science and philosophy of science, and of work that attempts to develop a unified science studies approach. Required for all students in the Science Studies Program. Prerequisites: enrollment in Science Studies Program.

HIGR 239. Seminar in Science Studies (4)

(Cross-listed as Communication 225B, Philosophy 209B, and Sociology 255B.) Study and discussion of selected topics in the science studies field. Required for all students in the Science Studies Program. May be repeated as course content changes annually. Prerequisites: enrollment in Science Studies Program.

HIGR 240. Colloquium in Science Studies (4)

(Cross-listed as Communication 225C, Philosophy 209C, and Sociology 255C.) A forum for the presentation and discussion of research in progress in science studies, by graduate students, faculty, and visitors. Required for all students in the Science Studies Program. May be repeated as course content changes annually. Prerequisites: enrollment in the Science Studies Program.

HIGR 241. Advanced Approaches to Science Studies (4)

(Cross-listed as COGR 225D, PHIL 209D, SOCG 255D.) Focus on recent literature in the history, philosophy, and sociology of science, technology, and medicine. Required of all students in the Science Studies Program. Prerequisites: HIGR 238 is a prerequisite for HIGR 241; enrollment in Science Studies Program or instructor’s permission.

HIGR 244. Introduction to Sound Studies (4)

Study and discussion of classic and recent scholarship on sound production and cultures of listening. Emphasizes historical literature but also includes works in literary studies, art history, music, and other fields. Prerequisites: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

HIGR 245A-B-C. Historical Scholarship on Latin American History (4-4-4)

Introduction to the literature of Latin American history. A three-quarter sequence of readings and discussions taught each quarter by members of the staff. Required for all beginning students for a graduate degree specializing in Latin American history; open and strongly recommended to other students using Latin American history as a secondary field for a graduate degree. HIGR 245A covers the colonial period, from conquest to independence to today; HIGR 245B covers South America from independence to today; HIGR 245C covers Mexico, Cuba, and Central America from independence to today. The three quarters need not be taken in sequence. Reading knowledge of Spanish is required.

HIGR 247A-B. Research Seminar in Colonial Latin America (4-4)

A two-quarter course involving readings and research on sixteenth- through eighteenth-century Latin America. Students are expected to compose a paper based on original research that is due in the second quarter. Reading knowledge of Spanish required. An IP grade will be awarded at the end of the first quarter. Final grade will not be given until the end of the second quarter.

HIGR 248A-B. Research Seminar in Latin America, National Period (4-4)

A two-quarter course involving readings and research; the first quarter is devoted to the nineteenth and the second quarter to the twentieth century. Students are expected to compose a paper based on original research that is due in the second quarter. An IP grade will be awarded at the end of the first quarter. Final grade will not be given until the end of the second quarter. Reading knowledge of Spanish and/or Portuguese is helpful but not required.

HIGR 252. History, Social Evolution, and Intellectuals in the Andes: Mariátegui, Haya de la Torre, and Arguedas (4)

The course will study three major twentieth-century interpreters of Andean history and society. Mariátegui is Latin America’s most original socialist intellectual; Haya de la Torre is the founder of Peru’s most important party; and Arguedas was the most profound interpreter of the role of Indian peasants in the Andean nations.

HIGR 257A. Historical Scholarship on Modern Middle East, Eighteenth to Twentieth Century (4)

Readings in the historiographical literature on the late Ottoman Empire (eighteenth to twentieth century). Prerequisites: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

HIGR 257B. Historical Scholarship on Modern Middle East, Colonial Period (4)

Readings in the historiographical literature on Middle Eastern states in the colonial period. Prerequisites: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

HIGR 257C. Historical Scholarship on Modern Middle East, Postcolonial Eras (4)

Readings in the historiographical literature on the Middle East in the national/postcolonial eras. Prerequisites: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

HIGR 265A-B-C. Historical Scholarship on American History (4-4-4)

A three-quarter sequence of readings and discussions on the bibliographical and monographic literature of American history from the colonial period to the present. Taught by different members of the staff each quarter, the course is required of all beginning graduate students in American history.

HIGR 267A-B. Research Seminar in United States History (4-4)

Readings and discussion in selected areas of American history for advanced graduate students. An IP (in progress) grade will be awarded the first quarter. The second quarter will be devoted to the presentation, discussion, and evaluation of work in progress. A final grade will be awarded at the end of the second quarter. Prerequisites: 267A is a prerequisite for 267B.

HIGR 275A. Research Seminar in Middle Eastern History (4)

HIGR 275A is the first quarter of a two-quarter research seminar in Middle Eastern history. Seminar topics will vary. Reading knowledge of Arabic or Turkish is expected. A paper, based on original research, will be due at the end of the second quarter. Final grade will not be given until the end of the second quarter. Prerequisites: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

HIGR 275B. Research Seminar in Middle Eastern History (4)

HIGR 275B is the second quarter of a two-quarter research seminar in Middle Eastern history. Seminar topics will vary. Reading knowledge of Arabic or Turkish is expected. A paper, based on original research, will be due at the end of the quarter. Final grade will be awarded for HIGR 275A and B at the end of the second quarter. Prerequisites: 275A and graduate standing or consent of instructor.

HIGR 295. Thesis Seminar (4)

For students advanced to candidacy to the doctorate. Discussion, criticism, and revision of drafts of chapters of theses and of work to be submitted for publication.

HIGR 298. Directed Reading (1–12)

Guided and supervised reading in the literature of the several fields of history. This course may be repeated for an indefinite number of times due to the independent nature of the content of the course. (S/U grades permitted.)

HIGR 299. PhD Thesis Direction (1–12)

Independent work by graduate students engaged in research and writing of doctoral theses. This course may be repeated for an indefinite number of times due to the independent nature of thesis writing and research. (S/U grades only.)

HIGR 500. Apprentice Teaching in History (1–4)

A course in which teaching assistants are aided in learning proper teaching methods by means of supervision of their work by the faculty: handling of discussions, preparation and grading of examinations and other written exercises, and student relations. (S/U grades only.)